For Journalists
[GO]

[GO]

 

   

University Of Virginia Art Museum Presents Ukiyo-E Japanese Color Woodblock Prints Symposium, Feb. 6 And 7

January 23, 2004 --


WHAT: Keynote Address: “An Appreciation of Nineteenth-Century Japanese Color Woodblock Prints”

WHEN: Friday, Feb. 6, 4:30 p.m.

WHERE: University of Virginia, Campbell Hall, Room 153

WHO: Sebastian Izzard, formerly of Christie’s of New York

WHAT: Symposium: Japanese Color Woodblock Prints

WHEN: Saturday, Feb. 7, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.

WHERE: University of Virginia, Campbell Hall, Room 153

WHO: Herman Ooms, professor, University of California at Los Angeles
Sandy Kita, assistant professor, Japanese art history, University of Maryland
Timon Screech, reader, department of art and archaeology, School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London

The University of Virginia Art Museum will present a symposium on “Japanese Color Woodblock Prints.” The symposium, made possible in part with the support of the Ellen Bayard Weedon Foundation, will be presented Feb. 6 and 7.

On Friday, Feb. 6, Sebastian Izzard will give the keynote address, “An Appreciation of Nineteenth-Century Japanese Color Woodblock Prints.”

On Saturday, Feb. 7, there will be three talks: “Forms and Norms in Edo Arts and Society,” by Herman Ooms; “Bringing Home the Changes: The Implications of New Views of Ukiyo-e on Their American Study,” by Sandy Kita; and “Going to the Courtesans: Transit to the Floating World in Edo Prints and Poems,” presented by Timon Screech.

Izzard, head of the Japanese and Korean art division of Christie’s of New York from 1980 to 1997, received his Ph.D. from the School of Oriental and African Studies in London in 1980. He has been honored for his scholarly catalogue “Kunisada’s World.”

Ooms, an expert on Edo (Tokyo) prints, has written extensively on Japanese art history and East/West relations. At UCLA, he teaches early modern (Tokugawa) Japanese history and the history of religions in Japan. Ooms received his master of arts degree in anthropology of religion at Tokyo University and his Ph.D. in Japanese history from the University of Chicago.

Kita, assistant professor of Japanese art history at the University of Maryland, is co-curator of the U.Va. Art Museum’s special exhibition “The Moon Has No Home.” He has written extensively on the art of ukiyo-e, or painting of the floating world, which originated in Edo and is closely connected with the pleasures of theaters, teahouses, geishas and courtesans.

Screech has been a reader in the department of art and archaeology at the School of Oriental and African Studies at the University of London since receiving his Ph.D. in art history from Harvard University in 1991. He has published widely on many aspects of Edo period art and culture, and has written several books in Japanese and English.

The U.Va. Art Museum is open Tuesday through Sunday, 1 to 5 p.m.

For details about the symposium, call the museum at (434) 924-3592 or visit the Web site: http://www.virginia.edu/artmuseum.

Contact: Katherine Jackson, (434) 924-3620

FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION: Contact the Office of University Relations at (434) 924-7116. Television reporters should contact the TV News Office at (434) 924-7550.

SOURCE: U.Va. News Services

2002 NEWS RELEASES
2001 NEWS RELEASES
2000 NEWS RELEASES
1999 NEWS RELEASES

UVa News Sources UVa Top News UVa WebCalendar UVa Home Page UVa News Sources UVa Top News UVa WebCalendar UVa Home Page

Top News site edited by Dan Heuchert (dnh6n@virginia.edu); maintained by Karen Asher (kac@virginia.edu); releases posted by Sally Barbour (sab4w@virginia.edu).
Last Modified: Wednesday, 02-Nov-2005 10:39:55 EST
© 2003 by the Rector and Visitors of the University of Virginia
Top News Information: (434) 924-7676.

 

News Sources UVa WebCalendar UVa Home Page News Sources UVa WebCalendar UVa Home Page UVa Top News UVa WebCalendar UVa Home Page UVa Top News UVa WebCalendar UVa Home Page UVa News Sources UVa Top News UVa WebCalendar UVa Home Page UVa News Sources UVa Top News UVa WebCalendar Uva Home Page