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Anthropology Expert On The Indus Valley Will Give U.Va. Art Museum’s Weedon Lecture On Oct. 8

September 24, 2004 --

WHAT: Weedon Lecture on the Arts of Asia

WHO: J. Mark Kenoyer, professor of anthropology and director of the Center for South Asia at the University of Wisconsin

TITLE: “Ancient Cities of the Indus Valley”

WHEN: Friday, Oct. 8, at 5:30 p.m.

WHERE: Campbell Hall, Room 153

Archaeological research in the Indus Valley has unearthed important contributions from the Indus culture that influenced later civilizations in South Asia and other regions of the world.

In his illustrated lecture, J. Mark Kenoyer, professor of anthropology and director of the Center for South Asia at the University of Wisconsin, will present an overview of the sculpture, ornament, seals and technologies of the ancient Indus Valley Civilization, located in present-day Pakistan and western India. He will focus on recent discoveries in Harappa, Pakistan, that have provided evidence on the origins of writing and urbanism in the Indus Valley. Kenoyer also will talk about other sites, including Mehrgarh and Nausharo in Pakistan, and Dholavira, India, and will discuss new discoveries on the origins of agriculture and animal husbandry, the emergence of village cultures and development of towns, and the urban expansion of the Indus or Harappan periods.

Kenoyer has worked in Pakistan and India for the past 29 years. He was born in India, where he lived until he came to the United States to attend college. He received a B.A. in anthropology from the University of California, Berkeley, where he also received his M.A. and Ph.D. in South Asian

Archaeology. He is a specialist in ancient technologies and crafts, socioeconomic and political organization, and religion in South Asia covering a broad range of cultural periods. Since 1986, he has served as the co-director and field director of the Harappa Archaeological Research Project in Pakistan, a long-term study of urban development in the Indus Valley. During this time, he has been a consultant and curator for national exhibits on Pakistan and the Indus Valley.

Kenoyer has written numerous books and articles, including a feature in the July 2003 issue of Scientific American and the June 2000 issue of National Geographic.
Parking will be available behind the museum and at Madison Hall.

For more information, call the University of Virginia Art Museum at (434) 924-3592 or visit the Web site: www.virginia.edu/artmuseum.

Contact: Jane Ford, (434) 924-4298

FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION: Contact the Office of University Relations at (434) 924-7116. Television reporters should contact the TV News Office at (434) 924-7550.

SOURCE: U.Va. News Services

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