ARCHIVE

Below is video footage from the Symposium

 

DAY 1: THURSDAY OCTOBER 20 2016

Events held at the Albert and Shirley Small Special Collections Library and the Paramount Theater


Time Event
8:45 am

Continental Breakfast, the Albert and Shirley Small Special Collections Library


9:30 - 9:55 am

WELCOME REMARKS & PANEL ONE: JULIAN BOND and THE CIVIL RIGHTS ARCHIVE at THE UNIVERSITY OF VIRGINIA

Civil Rights are positive legal prerogatives, the right to equal treatment before the law. These are rights shared by everyone. There’s no one in the United Stated who does not, or should not, share in these rights.

- Julian Bond

Deborah E. McDowell, Director of the Carter G. Woodson Institute for African-American and African Studies, the University of Virginia

 

Teresa A. Sullivan, President, the University of Virginia

 

Ian Baucom, Dean of the College and Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, the University of Virginia

 

Pamela Horowitz, widow of Julian Bond and a Washington D.C. attorney


PANEL ONE: JULIAN BOND and THE CIVIL RIGHTS ARCHIVE at THE UNIVERSITY OF VIRGINIA


Deborah E. McDowell, the University of Virginia

Video Excerpts from "Explorations in Black Leadership"

 

Eva Latterner, PhD candidate in English Literature, the University of Virginia

James Perla, Communications consultant at the Carter G. Woodson Institute for African-American and African Studies and independent radio producer

Nqobile Mthethwa, Fourth-Year (Senior), Foreign Affairs, the University of Virginia

Lucas Williams, Third-Year (Junior), Political and Social Thought, the University of Virginia

50/5: Remembering the Modern Movement for Civil Rights: The Julian Bond Papers

 

Derrick Alridge, Professor, Curry School of Education, the University of Virginia

Teachers in the Movement

 

Emma Edmunds, Independent Researcher, Mapping Local Knowledge: Danville, Va., 1945–75

Mapping Local Knowledge: Danville, Virginia


11:45 am -    1:00 pm

Lunch, the Garden Room, Hotel E

1:15 - 2:30 pm

PANEL TWO: 'A BAND OF SISTERS AND BROTHERS IN A CIRCLE OF TRUST': THE EARLY DAYS OF SNCC

I believe in an integrated America-- jobs, homes, and schools. I believe in it enough to have spent most of my life in its pursuit. I think it is a legal, moral, and political imperative of America--a matter of elemental justice, simple right waged against historical wrong.

- Julian Bond

Moderator: Lynn French, Executive Director of Hope and a Home, Inc.

 

Judy Richardson, Filmmaker and SNCC activist

Grassroots Organizing and Philosophy and Culture of SNCC

 

Charles Cobb, Field Secretary, SNCC

Julian Bond, SNCC, the Movement-Changing a Generation

 

Timothy Jenkins, SNCC, 1960 - 1965, Chairman Unlimited Visions Multimedia, Inc.

 

John Alexander, Associate Director of SHANTI (Social Sciences, Humanities and Arts Network of Technological Initiatives), the University of Virginia

SNCC, Mariela Varela, and the Poor People's Campaign


3:00 - 4:30 pm

PANEL THREE: SOUNDSCAPES OF THE CIVIL RIGHTS MOVEMENT

Jefferson once said 'music is the passion of my soul.' It is my passion too, and if it is not yours, your soul—indeed your life—is poorer for it.

—Julian Bond

Moderator: Steven Lewis, PhD candidate in Musicology, the University of Virginia

 

Jack Hamilton, Assistant Professor of American and Media Studies, the University of Virginia

"Changing Times, Coming Changes": A Story of Civil Rights and Rock and Roll

 

Waldo Martin, Alexander F. and May T. Morrison Professorship of American History and Citizenship, University of California Berkeley

"Go on With your Bad-d-d Self": Julian Bond on the Racial and Cultural Politics of 1950s Popular Music

 

Imani Perry, Hughes-Rogers Professor of African American Studies, Princeton University

Julian Bond at the Crossroads of Sound: From Anthem to Freedom Songs and Back Again

 

Maurice Wallace, Associate Director of the Carter G. Woodson Institute for African-American and African Studies, the University of Virginia

King's Vibrato: Martin Luther King, Jr. and the Sound of Blackness


6:15 - 7:30 pm

Reception, Paramount Theater (Invitation only)


8:00 - 9:30 pm

"Written in the Key of Justice" Musical Extravaganza, Paramount Theater



Day 2: Friday 21 October 2016

Events held at the Albert and Shirley Small Special Collections Library

Time Event
8:00 am

Continental Breakfast, the Albert and Shirley Small Special Collections Library


8:30 - 9:45 am

PANEL ONE: FROM PROTEST TO POLITICS

The mere right to vote is meaningless if we don’t also have the right to participate in politics

- Julian Bond

Moderator: Lynn Sanders, Associate Professor, Politics, the University of Virginia

 

LaTasha Levy, Assistant Professor of American Ethnic Studies, the University of Washington-Seattle

From Protest to Politics: Julian Bond as the People's Representative

 

H. Timothy Lovelace, Associate Professor, Maurer School of Law, Indiana University

Judging Vietnam: Bond v. Floyd and the Warren Court

 

Kim Forde-Mazrui, Mortimer M. Caplin Professor of Law, the University of Virginia

Racial Justice and the Law


9:45 - 11:00 am

PANEL TWO: THE CIVIL RIGHTS MOVEMENT IN HISTORY AND MEMORY

America is race-- from its symbolism to its substance, from its founding by slaveholders to its rending by Civil War, from Johnny Reb to Jim Crow, from the Ku Klux Klan to Katrina.

- Julian Bond, (Address to the 97th NAACP Convention, July 15, 2006)

Moderator: Katelyn Hale Wood, Assistant Professor of Theatre History, the University of Virginia

 

Wesley Arden Dick, Professor of History, Albion College

The Civil Rights Movement in History and Memory: Reflections on Julian Bond’s Civil Rights South Seminars

 

Julius Fleming, Assistant Professor of English, the University of Maryland, College Park; Carter G. Woodson Post-Doctoral Fellow

On the White Interior: Theater, Visual Culture, and the Modern Civil Rights Movement

 

Aniko Bodroghozy, Professor of Media Studies, the University of Virginia

Visual Media and the Movement: From Birmingham and Selma to Ferguson


11:15 am -  12:30 pm

PANEL THREE: THE GLOBAL REACH OF THE CIVIL RIGHTS MOVEMENT

Africa is my roots. My ancestors came from the west coast of Africa. Every black American has a stake in the Continent, a birthright stake as well as a history of our own involvement in the 200 year-old American struggle to make democracy real.

- Julian Bond, Speech Concerning South Africa, 1973

Moderator: Andrew W. Kahrl, Assistant Professor of History, the University of Virginia

 

Robert Trent Vinson, Frances L. and Edwin L. Cummings Associate Professor of History and Africana Studies, the College of William and Mary

Just Means, Jeremiads, and Regenerative Violence in the Transnational Christianity of Martin Luther King, Jr. and Albert Luthuli

 

J. T. Roane, McPherson/Eveillard Postdoctoral Fellow and Lecturer in Africana Studies, Smith College

Black Vitality as Black Environmentalism: Forging Alternative Human Infrastructures across Two Geographies of Dis-accumulation

 

Kwame E. Otu, Assistant Professor, the Carter G. Woodson Institute for African-American and African Studies, the University of Virginia

Bond/ing with Afro-Queer Diasporas: Julian Bond, Transnational LGBTI Human Rights Activism, and the LGBTI situation in Postcolonial Africa


12:45 -
1:30 pm

Boxed Lunch, Byrd Room, Albert and Shirley Small Special Collections Library


1:45 - 3:00 pm

PANEL FOUR: STUDENTS ON THE FRONTLINES

One of the things that has to be faced is the process of waiting to change the system, how much we have got to do to find out who we are, where we have come from and where we are going

- Ella Baker

Moderator: Emilye Crosby, Professor of History, Geneseo University

 

Jon Hale, Associate Professor, College of Charleston

The Freedom Schools: Students on the Frontlines of the Mississippi Civil Rights Movement

 

Wesley Hogan, Director of the Center for Documentary Studies, Duke University,

Ajamu Dillahunt, Sophomore, Political Science and History, North Carolina Central University

Rebekah Barber, Senior, English and History, North Carolina Central University

Ella Baker's Children: Bringing Activists Together Across the Generations


3:15 - 4:30 pm

PANEL FIVE: FROM "FREEDOM NOW" TO BLACK LIVES MATTER: LEGACIES OF THE CIVIL RIGHTS MOVEMENT IN CONTEMPORARY SOCIAL PROTEST

"There are many comparisons to be made between today and yesterday. This is the same struggle, the same fight, the same eagerness to do something about it. And we’re lucky to have these spirited young people involved in it."

- Philip Agnew, "Dream Defenders, A New Generation, Fights For Civil Rights In Florida"

Moderator: Lindsey E. Jones, PhD Candidate in History of Education, the University of Virginia Curry School of Education

 

Jeanne Theoharis, Distinguished Professor of Political Science, Brooklyn College of CUNY

Myths of the Civil Rights Movement in the Era of Black Lives Matter

 

Hasan Kwame Jeffries, Associate Professor, the Ohio State University

From "Freedom Now" to "BlackLivesMatter": Activism and African American Youth in the Age of Obama

 

Taylor Branch, author of the historical trilogy, America in the King Years


6:00 pm

Reception, Omni Hotel Ballroom (Invitation only)


7:00 pm

Culminating Banquet, Omni Hotel Ballroom (Invitation only)


Resources

But still we march. We march because Trayvon Martin has joined Emmett Till in the pantheon of young black martyrs. We march because the United States Supreme Court has eviscerated the Voting Rights Act, for which we fought and died. We march because every economic indicator shows gaping white-black disparities. We march for freedom from white supremacy. But still we have work to do. None of it is easy, but we have never wished our way to freedom; instead, we have always worked our way. Today we have much more to work with, and we take heart that so much has changed.

– Julian Bond speaking at the 50th anniversary of the 1963 March on Washington


Selections from the Work of Julian Bond


Speeches

Articles

Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee

Vietnam

Explorations in Black Leadership

  • Explorations in Black Leadership documents the lives of 51 Black leaders in America through interviews with the late civil rights leader Julian Bond.
  • The project was co-directed by Julian Bond and Phyllis Leffler.For more information about the Explorations in Black Leadership project, click here.

Poetry & Lyrics

The Bishop seduces the world with his voice
Sweat strangles mute eyes
As insinuations gush out through a hydrant of sorrow
Dream's, a world never seen
Moulded on Africa's anvil, tempered down home
Documented in cries and wails
Screaming to be ignored, crooning to be heard
Throbbing from the gutter
On Saturday night
Silver offering only
The Right Reverend's back in town
Don't it make you feel alright?

- Julian Bond, the Bishop of Atlanta: Ray Charles

HABANA

(According to Bond, this poem was based on conversations he had during his first trip to Cuba as

a nineteen-year-old college student at Morehouse, soon after the Cuban Revolution.)

 

Soldiers fuzz the city in khaki confusion

Pincushioned with weapons

Seedy orange venders squeeze among the pulpy masses

Camera pregnant tourists click down the Prado

Lotería salesmen tear along the dotted line

Guitars pluck loafers into corner bars

Uniformed schoolgirls genuflect languorously

Climactic roaming rainbow dresses cling slowly

Punctuating neon orgasms in the mambo night

And above Fidel’s sandpaper voice,

"You want a girl, maybe?"

Selected Scholarship of conference participants

  • Alridge, Derrick P. The Educational Thought of W.E.B. DuBois. New York: Teachers College Press, 2008
  • Baucom, Ian. Specters of the Atlantic: Finance Capital, Slavery, and the Philosophy of History. Durham: Duke University Press, 2005.
  • Bodroghkozy, Aniko. Equal Time: Television and the Civil Rights Movement. Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 2012.
  • Bloom, Joshua; Martin, Waldo E. Black Against Empire: The History and Politics of the Black Panther Party. Berkeley: University of California Press, 2013.
  • Branch, Taylor. Parting the Waters: America In the King Years, 1954-1963. New York: Simon and Schuster, 1988.
  • Cobb, Charles. This Nonviolent Stuff'll Get You Killed: How Guns Made the Civil Righs Movement Possible. New York: Basic Books, 2014.
  • Crosby, Emilye. A Little Taste of Freedom: the Black Freedom Struggle In Claiborne County, Mississippi. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2005.
  • Hale, Jon. The Freedom Schools: Student Activists in the Mississippi Civil Rights Movement. New York: Columbia University Press, 2016.
  • Hamilton, John. Just around Midnight: Rock and Roll and the Racial Imagination. Cambridge: Harvard University Press, September 2016.
  • Hogan, Wesley. Many Minds, One Heart: SNCC and the Dream for a New America. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2007.
  • Holsaert, Faith S; Richardson, Judy [et at.]. Hands On the Freedom Plow : Personal Accounts by Women In SNCC. Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 2010.
  • Jeffries, Hasan Kwame. Bloody Lowndes : Civil Rights and Black Power In Alabama's Black Belt. New York: New York University Press, 2009.
  • Kahrl, Andrew W. The Land Was Ours: African American Beaches From Jim Crow to the Sunbelt South. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 2012.
  • Perry, Imani. More Beautiful and More Terrible : the Embrace and Transcendence of Racial Inequality In the United States. New York: New York University Press, 2011.
  • Ramsey, Guthrie P. Race Music : Black Cultures From Bebop to Hip-hop. Berkeley: University of California Press, 2003.
  • Theoharis, Jeanne. The Rebellious Life of Mrs. Rosa Parks. Boston: Beacon Press, 2013.
  • Vinson, Robert Trent. The Americans Are Coming! : Dreams of African American Liberation In Segregationist South Africa. Athens: Ohio University Press, 2012.
  • Wallace, Maurice O. Constructing the Black Masculine : Identity and Ideality In African American Men's Literature and Culture, 1775-1995. Durham [N.C.]: Duke University Press, 2002.

VISUAL IMAGES OF THE MOVEMENT