April 30, 2017

Upcoming Spring 2017 Events

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Thursday, April 27, 8:00 p.m., OLD CABELL HALL

UVA Klezmer Ensemble Concert with special guest, Grammy-winner Lorin Sklamberg (Klezmatics)

Directed by Joel Rubin, the Klezmer Ensemble focuses on the music of the klezmorim, the Jewish professional instrumentalists of eastern Europe, as well as related Jewish and other East European traditions from the 18th century to the present, including Yiddish song.

The performance will feature special guest singer and multi-instrumentalist Lorin Sklamberg, hailed by legendary music critic Robert Christgau as “one of the premier American singers in any genre” with a voice that is “transcendent, ethereal and sensual” (All Things  Considered, National Public Radio).

Besides being a founding member of the Grammy-winning, trailblazing Yiddish-American roots band, The Klezmatics, Sklamberg has performed on 50 albums and is known for his work with the Semer Ensemble, Alpen Klezmer, Susan McKeown, the Nigunim Trio, Sklamberg and the Shepherds, the Zmiros Project, and in Drawing Life, a multi-media song cycle. He has composed and performed for film, dance, stage and circus, and has produced a number of recordings of world and theater music. Sklamberg has taught and lectured from London and Paris to Kiev and St. Petersburg. He is also the Sound Archivist of the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research in New York and former coordinator of KlezKamp: The Yiddish Folk Arts Program.

Tickets for the Klezmer Ensemble performance are $10 for adults and $5 for students. Tickets for University of Virginia students are free if reserved in advance at the Arts Box Office. Tickets are available in advance or at the door.

Organized by the McIntire Department of Music. Co-sponsored by the UVA Jewish Studies Program, the Center for Russian, East European and Eurasian Studies, and the Center for German Studies.

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PAST SPRING 2017 EVENTS

Thursday, March 2, 5:00 p.m., Hotel A, Center for Global Inquiry and Innovation

“The East is Red? Imagining China in People’s Poland and East Germany”

David Tompkins, Associate Professor of History, Carleton College

Organized and sponsored by CREEES as part of the UVa Polish Lecture Series. Co-sponsored by the Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures, the Corcoran Department of History and the Center for German Studies.

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Thursday, March 16, 4:00 p.m. – 5:30 p.m., Cabell 058

“Russian Virginia In and Out of the Classroom: A Roundtable”

Prof. Edith Clowes, Alex Kozoyed, Veri Silva, Alex Moree, David Peters, University of Virginia

This roundtable is part of the Spring 2017 Slavic Colloquium at UVa.

Colloquium Event Poster

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 Thursday, March 30, 5:00 p.m., Hotel A, Center for Global Inquiry and Innovation

“The Sixties Behind the Iron Curtain: Youth Culture and the Global Sixties in Poland

Malgorzata Fidelis, Associate Professor of History, University of Illinois at Chicago

Organized and sponsored by CREEES as part of the UVa Polish Lecture Series. Co-sponsored by the Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures and by the Corcoran Department of History.

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UVA Slavic Forum 2017, REConstructions, Memory and Imagination posterFriday, March 31 – Saturday, April 1, Panels held in New Cabell Hall, Information Desk in NCH 262
RE:Constructions: An Interdisciplinary Forum on Memory and Imagination
This forum is devoted to the intersections of memory and imagination in constructing identity, history, traditions, and futures. Traditional applications of the terms memory and imagination have emphasized a barrier between the concepts based on the premise of accuracy. Memory should be a record, one that, if occasionally faulty, remains primarily truthful. Imagination cannot be faulty because it is nebulous, fictive, unconcerned with veracity. However, cognitive scientists have demonstrated that the same neural processes underlie both memory and imagination. Memories are as much constructs as imagination. Despite the seeming differences between memory and imagination, they both affect every sphere of human experience and endeavor. In this forum, speakers will explore the role of memory and imagination in literature, history, politics, and identity.
The forum is organized by the Society of Slavic Graduate Students and co-sponsored by the Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures, CREEESthe French DepartmentDepartment of Art, and the Center for Global Inquiry + Innovation.

 

Keynote speakers:
Friday, March 31, 6 p.m., Maury 209
Topic: LGBTQ Activism in Russia.
Maria “Masha” Gessen, Russian journalist, author, and political activist; contributor to The New York Review of Books, The New Yorker, The New York Times, Vanity Fair, and The Washington Post; author of groundbreaking books on Russian politics, society, culture, and historyFor more information see speaker’s bio at www.prhspeakers.com.

 

Saturday, April 1, 5:30 p.m., Maury 209
“The Texture of Translingual Memory, or Nabokov in the Attic”
Maxim D. Shrayer, Professor of Russian, English, and Jewish Studies at Boston College.

Maxim D. Shrayer, a bilingual author and translator, is a professor of Russian, English, and Jewish Studies at Boston College. Born in Moscow in 1967 to a writer’s family, Shrayer emigrated to the United States in 1987. He has authored over ten books in English and Russian, among them the internationally acclaimed memoirs “Leaving Russia: A Jewish Story” and “Waiting for America: A Story of Emigration,” the story collection “Yom Kippur in Amsterdam,” and the Holocaust study “I SAW IT.” Shrayer’s “Anthology of Jewish-Russian Literature” won a 2007 National Jewish Book Award, and in 2012 he received a Guggenheim Fellowship. Visit Shrayer’s website at www.shrayer.com.

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Wednesday, April 12, 5:00 p.m., NAU 211

“Russian Art in the United States”

Wilfried Zeisler, Curator of Russian and 19th Century Art, Hillwood Museum

Founded by Marjorie Merriweather Post (1887-1973), heiress to the Postum Cereal Company, which later became General Foods, Hillwood Estate, Museum & Gardens houses over 17,000 works of art. The collection includes one of the largest and most important collections of Russian art outside Russia, comprising pieces from the pre-Petrine to the early Soviet periods. Through Hillwood’s collection, this lecture will explore the history of acquiring imperial Russian art in the United States.

Organized and sponsored by the Center for Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies. Co-sponsored by the Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures and the Carl H. and Martha S. Lindner Center for Art History (McIntire Department of Art).

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Thursday, April 13, 2:30 p.m., MINOR 125

“QUR’ANIC EXEGESIS AND MYSTICAL EXPERIENCE: SUFIS AND THE QUR’AN”

CSC Speaker Series: Professor Alexander Knysh

Alexander Knysh is Professor of Islamic Studies at the University of Michigan and Principal Investigator of a research project on Islamic Studies at the St. Petersburg State University, Russia.

Co-sponsored by CREEES.

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Thursday, April 13, 4:00 p.m., NEW CABELL 309


“Brothers and the Family Plot: A Comparative Approach to the Nineteenth-Century Russian and English Novel”

Anna Berman, Assistant Professor of Russian Studies, McGill University

Family concerns drive the plot of most nineteenth-century English and Russian novels, yet the family plots in the two traditions differ greatly. Why are there virtually no English novels that focus on a pair of brothers, while brothers are common in the Russian novel? Russian authors were keen readers of the English, regarding them as a model for writing about family, so this paper explores the way the historical conditions in the two nations shaped their family plots.  The English, who honored primogeniture, viewed brothers as a source of rivalry that did not fit their family ideal. By contrast, the Russians split estates among their children, opening up a space for multiple brothers.  I will argue that this has implications for the structure of the novel, as the English created vertical, generationally focused plots, while the Russians created a new kind of lateral family plot.

Organized and sponsored by the Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures. Co-sponsored by the Center for Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies.

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Friday, April 14, 12:00 p.m., NAU 211

“A Clash of Islams: Sufism and Salafism in the Northern Caucasus”

CSC Speaker Series: Professor Alexander Knysh

Alexander Knysh is Professor of Islamic Studies at the University of Michigan and Principal Investigator of a research project on Islamic Studies at the St. Petersburg State University, Russia.

Co-sponsored by CREEES.

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Thursday, April 20, 4:00 p.m. – 5:30 p.m., CABELL 058

Confession(s) in Fyodor Dostoevsky’s Crime and Punishment

Prof. Julian Connolly, University of Virginia

This talk is part of the Spring 2017 Slavic Colloquium at UVa.

Colloquium Event Poster

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Sunday, April 23, OLD CABELL 113

Yiddish Song Workshop with Grammy-winner Lorin Sklamberg (Klezmatics)

Free and open to the public. Contact: Joel Rubin, joelerubin@virginia.edu

Organized by the McIntire Department of Music. Co-sponsored by the UVA Jewish Studies Program, the Center for Russian, East European and Eurasian Studies, and the Center for German Studies.

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Wednesday, April 26, 12-1:30 pm, NEW CABELL 236

“The Semer Record Label: Jewish Music in Nazi Berlin, 1933-1938” 

Colloquium with Lorin Sklamberg (YIVO Institute for Jewish Research, New York).

Organized by the McIntire Department of Music. Co-sponsored by the UVA Jewish Studies Program, the Center for Russian, East European and Eurasian Studies, and the Center for German Studies.