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Forum Concluded

This forum was open from June 24 to July 23, 2010.

WTJU thanks all of those that contributed to this forum, your opinions are appreciated and will be considered as we look for ways to build listenership, increase student involvement and revenue.


Download a PDF of the June 24, 2010 Business Plan presintaion.

Business Planning Document Presented to the WTJU Station Meeting - June 24, 2010

From current situational analysis, to five year goals for increasing student involvement, listenership and revenues, the presentation kicked off the process to draw input from the community on proposed changes.

Download a PDF of the Business Planning presentation.


Volunteer Announcers' Proposed Plan for WTJU Renewal - July 10, 2010

This plan was developed by a committee of music directors and a few volunteer announcers. It was endorsed by all four music departments of WTJU. Based on continued input by volunteer announcers, and other stakeholders, more details and further refinements will follow.

Download a PDF of the Volunteer Announcers' Proposed Plan for WTJU Renewal.


A New Plan for Volunteerism at WTJU - July 12, 2010

Conversation with undergraduate DJs has revealed a uniform concern over the inability of new DJs to easily become assimilated into the community of volunteers at WTJU. The current training system, whereby a new DJ enters a stable of substitute DJs after only a few hours of formalized training, is not a sustainable model for creating a sense of vibrancy and community at WTJU.

Download a PDF of the A New Plan for Volunteerism at WTJU.


Audio of WTJU Town Hall Meeting - July 12, 2010

Courtesy of Nick Rubin.


WTJU Town Hall Forum Draws 200 Supporters - UVa Today, July 14, 2010

Determination to preserve the musical diversity of WTJU-FM while helping it increase listenership, student participation and revenue was the dominant theme of a town hall-style meeting Monday evening for volunteers and fans of the station. About 200 people attended the meeting, held in the Zehmer Hall conference center at the University of Virginia. Highlights included a promise of support from out-of-town alumni of the station, and a surprise offer from an anonymous would-be buyer.

Read the full article WTJU Town Hall Forum Draws 200 Supporters.

To volunteers, friends and supporters of WTJU:

We are at a juncture in the life of 53-year-old WTJU where change is needed in order to build listenership, student involvement and revenue. This is your invitation to help shape the station.

No decisions have been made regarding changes to the current program schedule. We continue to gather thoughtful ideas and opinions from the community, which will be considered by the WTJU community in an open, participatory process to review the station's mission, vision and identity. Program changes may come about as a result of this inclusive process.


Results

Total Number of Responses: 500

Are you a volunteer? Are you a donor or underwriter?
17%83% 70%30%
What music genre do you listen to most frequently on WTJU?
34%23%22%21%

Increasing Student Participation:

WTJU receives about 40% of its operating funds from U.Va. student fees. What are your ideas for getting more students involved with the station and enhancing their educational experience?

Rose Ann | July 23, 2010 6:30 pm
I'm pretty new to the area, so won't be able to comment substantively about a lot of this. BUT I remember clearly that I never heard of classical music until I got to college. It now is one of the most important parts of my life. Introducing students who know nothing about classical music may not turn them all into fans, but it will surely enrich their lives.

Nick | July 23, 2010 5:36 pm
one way for WTJU to interface with more students is to pair with appropriate courses and offer class credit for services like maintaining/improving the web site, engineering live shows in and out of the WTJU studios, writing PSAs, helping with underwriting, and conducting audience/market research.

Christopher Javor | July 23, 2010 2:54 pm
I have read plenty of good ideas on the forum and I agree.

Katie Vogel | July 23, 2010 1:19 pm
I don't think that is a bad idea at all. I think a lot of UVA students would enjoy WTJU, but especially those from out of town may not know that it exists. Offering internship positions would be a good idea. I know if I went to UVA, I would be extremely interested in getting involved.

Scott Pettis | July 23, 2010 11:57 am
Live broadcasts at local events (e.g., sporting events such as football, basketball, etc.).

Gary Westmoreland | July 22, 2010 12:41 pm
Increasing student involvement could be expanded to include PVCC and local high schools. Also, WTJU could broadcast the inaugural address of new president Teresa Sullivan in April 2011 to align itself more with interests of UVA.

Daniel J Holm | July 21, 2010 7:27 pm
Not being a UVA student, I can't comment on this other than say to offer involvement through the music school and affiliated programs etc. Music is huge in C'ville, it should be a no brainer. A local music show with student DJ's. A journalism show with students. Give students a feeling of ownership and see where it goes.

Philip Stafford | July 21, 2010 3:54 pm
Do students know that volunteer work is possible at WTJU? Put some mention of this in incoming orientation packets, or put ads in the Cavalier Daily. A logo or presence at University events might help.

George | July 21, 2010 2:11 pm
Exposure, giving students a chance and reason to get involved. Music venues around town,

Brian Keena | July 20, 2010 10:52 pm
Start broadcasting the station at live events (football/basketball games), as well as student-gathering sites, like Newcomb Hall, the Bookstore, etc. STOP broadcasting robot-controlled digital radio and START broadcasting THE radio station of THE University of Virginia. Allow WTJU to be a presence at student events. Add WTJU to the UVA web home page. OFfer a credit-course for internship at WTJU.

Philippa Whitelaw | July 20, 2010 10:44 pm
I think WTJU is a great radio station way better than others with all the diversity. does it have to be all music? Why not introduce a journalism section where students can develop those skills and prepare interesting and stimulating radio pieces (preferably not about politics or religion!) Listen to to the BBC radio 4 podcasts - Very different from BBC world service or NPR - Radio like that is addictive, intellectual and stimulating for the creators and audience. However please dont focus on students - By inference 60% of your funds come from outside UVA fees.

bob bradley | July 20, 2010 12:58 pm
check out the collaborative work done by UVa Engaged Technology partners Dr. Megan Raymond and Ed Berger at www.sandboxnetwork.org --an ncaa-like model of intercollegiate scholarship through multi-media and social networking.

James Shelton | July 19, 2010 11:30 pm
Invite UVA students to be volunteer djs or to give talks on their area of study from foreign policy majors to art and philosophy majors and graduate students.

Bill Sublette | July 19, 2010 6:54 pm
1) Broadcast live performances by student musicians. 2) Broadcast taped concerts by student musicians. 3) Provide a slot that gives faculty in arts/humanities classes the opportunity to assign students to develop a radio show built around a theme--i.e, music of 18th century France or the roots ofof baroque opera. 4) Start a student-run show focusing on artists/acts coming to Charlottesville, featuruing examples of their music and other preview highlights. 5) Give students the chance to serve as co-hosts with experienced DJs to learn the ropes; students could audition for the opportunity. 6) In collaboration with the U.Va. Art Museum, give students the opportunity to develop shows featuring music that relate to major exhibitons.

Tim Ballo | July 17, 2010 9:00 pm
WTJU needs to be more visible. One of the positive aspects of the Peabody Hall location was that the station was centrally located on Grounds. The windows in the station's library allowed students to see the volunteers at work. While the Lambeth studio is a vastly superior space, it has only contributed to the station's invisibility. To make up for this, the station needs to increase its efforts to be a visible presence on Grounds in other ways. WTJU's web presence also needs to be improved and marketed. At minimum, archived shows should be available for download.

Nancy Deutsch | July 16, 2010 3:57 pm
connect with specific departments, majors, and student organizations that have overlapping interests and promote DJing and other opportunities to students in those departments; offer internships to students who have an interest in radio/music/journalism/media and offer them real opportunities to gain skills and work experience through an internship

Kristofer Monson | July 16, 2010 10:17 am
absolutely in support of it! music is a fantastic education tool.

David Cosper | July 16, 2010 12:39 am
It might help to publicize the station's offerings to university instructors in related fields so that they could make students aware of the station as a resource for supporting academic work in these areas.

Peter Tschirhart | July 15, 2010 10:28 pm
One way to get more students involved would be to link station operations with a class or seminar on mass media--though it could ultimately be a course in music, STS, english, journalism, or some clever combination. Also, I'm not sure if it's allowed by university regulations, but having competitive (paid) internships or semester-long fellowships might be a good way to attract undergrads looking for real-world experience in the media business, and offer them the chance to make a few bucks in the process. A shorter version of this answer is "create incentives," whether that means course credit or a small income.

Michael Heny | July 15, 2010 9:23 pm
When I was a student at UVA I never once went to a football game--but I listened to alot of WTJU. It shouldn't need to please everyone--just the passionate few.

Allison Robbins | July 15, 2010 8:28 pm
I think the key would be to have information on WTJU that students want or need that they can *only* get on WTJU. I don't want to downplay music programming and all of the terrific work that the DJs do, but it would be interesting to have, say, a couple hours a week devoted to "talk" radio. Featured debates about campus issues? Student-interest stories? Maybe these shows could be a collaboration with the Cavalier Daily, i.e. getting student media outlets to work together. What about giving local bands that play gigs around the university some time on the air?

Jeffrey M. Preston | July 15, 2010 12:32 pm
I was a listener/supporter of WXLV when Burr was the manager. The Americana format that he created was fabulous and elevated the station from being just another college station. WJTU would be wise to try his plan. I would listen online and possibly support WJTU were his plan adopted.

Thatcher Stone | July 15, 2010 9:09 am
stream to the web

eve schwartz | July 15, 2010 8:54 am
To get students involved with the station you need to made them into listeners. Make efforts to broadcast in public areas where students spend time: dining halls, Newcomb Hall, UVA bookstore, gymnasiums. Hang banners close by. Have a table at student orientation events, beginning with new student orientation this summer.

byron robitaille | July 15, 2010 7:29 am
The Madison House website states that it is one of the largest student run volunteer organizations in the country. It has 3300 weekly volunteers and FIFTY PERCENT of UVa students volunteer with Madison House at least once during their time at Uva. 58% of the fy2008 budget (447.000.00) was from direct giving, according to the Madison House website. Maybe OPA should let Madison House have the station. I went to the town hall forum and except for a few skinny young white rock dj's, the attendees (200 people) were skinny old white adults, who wanted to make two points: the station is excellent the way it is, and someone else should pay for it. Brother, it's time for a change.

Marybeth Collins | July 15, 2010 12:15 am
1) I see you have posted the need for volunteers to write PSA's. Journalism students could receive credit for this and in serving other WTJU needs that involve writing and editing including the office of paid staff. 2) The web page needs to be seriously restructured. The conservative Jeffersonian look is inconsistent with the hip, out-of-the box, non-politically correct thing that WTJU is. Who better to use technology to revamp the function and image of the computer end of things than college students? Put those 18-22 year olds to work on improving WTJU's cyber image and function~~and give them college credit for their work. There are a myriad of things that could be done to the web page that has likely never even occurred to people over thirty. 3) Within the last month, I noticed a new Fan Club was started on Facebook entitled "Keep WTJU Weird." I think you could learn from this and use it to your advantage in various aspects of promoting the station, increasing student involvement and generating more funds.

Valerie L'Herrou | July 14, 2010 7:25 pm
--I don't know if UVA requires volunteer service to graduate, but if so, is TJU on the list of orgs with which to volunteer? --And, is it available for the fed workstudy program? --Is it on the list of internships--in journalism, music, public relations, communications? --Is info re TJU included in first-year orientation materials, including electronic communications sent to students? --Is it included in the packet that's sent to high-school students applying to UVA? --Is TJU broadcast at orientation events? --Included in on-grounds music events? --are bumperstickers, etc, given out? I mean, come on! there are many standard things we could be doing, some of which we used to do...

Tom Tartaglino | July 14, 2010 8:13 am
I suppose be out there. So many people I talk to don't even know you exist. When they hear you, they like you. perhaps functions on campus for incoming students.

MW | July 13, 2010 10:49 pm
Students must know the station exists for them to want to get involved. Look at how WUVA uses students. Brainstorm with faculty in the Media Studies and Music departments (other departments too) about using WTJU as academic resource. Provide internship opportunities in areas such as production (writing and producing PSAs, music calendars, news); marketing and promotions; development (fund raising and underwriting); station management; and engineering. Once the intern job descriptions are finalized, post them on our website, share them with the University Internship Program, share them with faculty in the Media Studies and Music departments, etc. How many students are currently WTJU volunteers? Survey their opinions.

Ginny Chilton | July 13, 2010 8:39 pm
Get students involved in making changes to the station. Give students their own programs, without oversight (or rather, without any more oversight than a normal volunteer). Give them freedom to be creative. The possibilities are endless: not just student DJs, but live student performances from the studio, all organized by students. On all programs, allow more time for advertising student events, especially in the arts, but maybe even outside that. Can TJU broadcast from outside station headquarters? Go to a student performance and broadcast it live. Event staff may allow a table, banners, etc to advertise this fact to those in attendance.

Lesley Myers | July 13, 2010 3:46 pm
Promoting the hell out of it as the last bastion of free music programming on the East Coast! Support having local musicians of all stripes, including students, do shows on the station, especially live shows.

Howard Vidaver | July 13, 2010 10:56 am
The music world is in major transition. Today more clearly than ever, it's live music and recordings of live music which lead the way. C'ville and UVA have a vibrant musical community. Offering students live performing opportunities will bring the station more energy and vibrancy.

Helen Marr | July 13, 2010 8:58 am
Better marketing and publicity. I think WTJU currently enhances students' educational experience by its very knowledgeable DJ's and eclectic programming. It is crucial that WTJU continue to provide this diverse repertoire of music. With the loss of The Prism and Gravity Lounge, there are no venues left in C'ville to hear traditional folk music.

Roger Clarke | July 13, 2010 4:15 am
Give students 20-30 slots per year for internships eligible for academic credit in: business underwriting; public relations; marketing; graphic arts; electrical engineering; audio engineering; web-creation; grantwriting; FCC compliance; new media development (podcasting); event planning; digital library management; radio journalism. As for on-air talent, build a mentor/apprentice program to develop in students a broad and in-depth knowledge of musical genres and repertoires. Create a residence hall dedicated to media/new media/ journalism. Move towards a long-term goal of a 50/50 balance of students and community volunteers by increasing the overall number of positions.

Don Harrison | July 12, 2010 11:58 pm
Well, the one thing I wouldn't do is bury Rock programming into the wee hours and expect more student involvement. This question is a bit loaded anyway. There are already students involved and I think their education is already enhanced by the full range of musical experiences available on (and with) WTJU. But it has to start with better promotion. I have never seen WTJU pushed to the students by the University in any direct or an indirect way… it isn’t promoted in any way on UVa’s website or in orientation materials… the station has never had a real advertising budget... the advertising campaigns run in the past have been staid at best. So, again, students are welcome - it's a fact. All the Office of Public Affairs has to do is give the station the resources to let them know about it.

Werner K. Sensbach | July 12, 2010 11:42 pm
Make music student participation in managing and running the station mandatory and offer credit for the participation

Susan C Scott | July 12, 2010 10:34 pm
Advertise and develop reasons for participation

Darryl Morris | July 12, 2010 8:10 pm
What does WTJU want to be? Does it want to be a station for all of the people all of the time? If so, it’s like buying a tool that will do everything, but it does nothing well. Is the goal of WTJU to improve the community, or is it to satisfy the lowest common denominator? The University of Virginia needs to raise revenue, but do they ask the students what they want to study, how long they want to study and what they think their grades should be? Or do they try to foster an institution of learning and promote the betterment of the students and, thus, the community? Does the University want to be known as a “party” school or as a viable educational institution? My personal taste is Classical music. Although I’m not totally knowledgeable about Classical music, this music does have a language of its own. Even if (as in opera), you might not understand the words, you know when something is beautiful and uplifting. Just ask yourself, what is your competition in Classical programming in this area? Do you want to remain unique, or do you wish to be just another number on the dial? In reference to student participation, one area of the programming I appreciate is the commentary your announcers provide on the pieces being performed, and I would like to see this expanded. In this light, students (i.e., music majors, writers, history majors, sound technicians, etc.) could be used as researchers, for credit, and do the research on the various composers, instruments and the pieces themselves and how they evolved. It would be interesting and informative to have entire segments on music history interspersed with actual musical examples of the period being discussed. An example might be a discussion of the music our own Thomas Jefferson enjoyed during his lifetime, or the origin and properties of the forte piano that now resides in Monticello. Increased involvement by the students would create more interest, and thus support, by the community.

Judy MOrris | July 12, 2010 7:28 pm
I don’t have any good ideas on how to increase student participation, but I really don’t think turning WTJU into a bland, “please everybody” radio station serves any purpose. In my humble opinion, your Classical programming is the best thing going and I would hate to see any of that go by the wayside. In fact, I think you might be better served if it were entirely Classical. Your audience is more sophisticated and probably has more disposable income than the rock or folk set. Without the Classical programming of the high integrity WTJU currently has, I really believe that portion of your listening audience will drop off and thus goes their support. WTJU then becomes just another nondescript station, of which we have many. You don’t have to go very far on the dial to find folk, rock, jazz or hillbilly. When I moved to Virginia six years ago, I was thrilled to find a station that played Classical music of the highest caliber as does WTJU. It’s hard to believe the dedication of the volunteer announcers and the hours they put in. If you end up having to cut any of the Classical programming (God forbid!), please, PLEASE don’t cut the Sunday Opera Matinee. Ann and Tim do such a find job and the variety of full-length opera they offer with background and commentary is very unusual. Bottom line, if Classical is cut, my support, both as a listener and as a donor, will go with it (sorry).

Linn Harrison | July 12, 2010 6:00 pm
LOts of good ideas have been offered already. I am not directly involved with students in arts and sciences but thought the suggestions re: tying particpation to academic activities (Darden for fund-raisung, $ issues, Music and journalism classes for programming) were good starting points.

Khalil Hassan | July 12, 2010 4:24 pm
Create a student advisory board for the station. Have several segments where students discuss news on and around the campus.

Toni Barskile | July 12, 2010 3:59 pm
Advertise more. Maybe ads on busses, throw "intro to WTJU" recruitment parties, get someone to write an article in the CD about WTJU volunteers.

Beth Burnam | July 12, 2010 3:25 pm
Make them aware of how unique and utterly cool their radio station is. Run bumper sticker marketing programs. Interview students to ask them to give up Facebook for a week and spend the same amount of time working at a radio station that is a light in a dark place.

Rob Sheffield | July 12, 2010 3:05 pm
Rock = student involvement. It couldn’t be simpler. Student involvement = rock. Rock has always been the gateway drug, luring in student listeners and student volunteers to WTJU, where they discover the delights of classical, jazz, folk, reggae, African, etc. Cutting rock hours would mean cutting student involvement. And students are needed, because they are especially qualified to address the station’s biggest weaknesses (fundraising, promotion, web presence).

Virginia Daugherty | July 12, 2010 2:38 pm
Give credit for working in the station. Promote the shows to the student population. This discussion should be held during the school year, not in the summer.

Sharon Defibaugh | July 12, 2010 2:37 pm
Does WTJU have a volunteer / information table set up at the beginning of the school year, with all the other organizations, so first years can have exposure to the opportunity to listen, volunteer, and support the station? If not, a great place to start.

Keith Alnwick | July 12, 2010 2:31 pm
Emphasize the freedom of speech and choice that WTJU offers, rather than being a formulaic, market driven commercial enterprise. That, and the community aspect - you're not just reaching your friends, peers, facebook contacts, you're connecting with people you might never know, and turning them on to the things that you love.

Bryan Wright | July 12, 2010 2:23 pm
WTJU is unique, certainly in our area and perhaps in the county, in the diversity of its programming. This is the station's key strength. When recruiting and advertising, emphasize this diversity. The station is a research laboratory where each student volunteer has an opportunity to re-invent radio, bringing his or her own creativity and cultural wealth to this medium.

Michael Holroyd | July 12, 2010 1:48 pm
When I first started volunteering at the station I had a lot of enthusiasm, but nobody seemed really organized and willing to make changes to improve the station, so eventually I stopped spending much time at the station. Getting the genre groups to work together and not being afraid of making big changes will keep more students interested. Better advertisement of jobs that need to be done around the station would also help.

Richard Davis | July 12, 2010 12:34 pm
I prefer classical and listen to either WTJU or WVTF to satisfy that need. It seems to me that WTJU is 90% JAZZ after 9AM...which I never listen to.

Peter Hedlund | July 12, 2010 12:22 pm
Better promotion for how that process works.

Lynn Hedlund | July 12, 2010 12:02 pm
I work on main grounds and I don't see many postings, etc. for student opportunities with WTJU. I would think that allowing students to create 4 minute stories on research projects would draw interest across grounds.

Dennis DaLuiso | July 12, 2010 11:51 am
DJ opportunities are very good; perhaps there could be more involvement with planning of specific programs. Also WTJU doesn't need to be dependent on VA Foundation for Humanities for special interest stories. Students could do these from their specific viewpoint.

Carol chandross | July 12, 2010 11:17 am
I am sure that the classical music students appreciate the fantastic variety that the station gives. Allowing them to pick their favorites should help. It has to also look great on their resumes.

Kate Nesbitt | July 12, 2010 11:17 am
I agree with the Volunteer Announcers Plan the programming is not the first thing to change. If student involvement is the goal, why are you doing all this in the summer when they are all away? Seems strange.

kate nesbitt | July 12, 2010 10:39 am
program contemporary rock at prime listening hours for students (evening, late hours). Keep news broadcast option available to students during the school year.

Michael Ludgate | July 12, 2010 10:14 am
I believe you should produce magazine shows that would explore University and Community issues. I also think it is deplorable that WTJU in the years before WVTF and WMRA moved in on your market, that you never qualified as a NPR outlet.

Carla Arton | July 12, 2010 7:41 am
Have a morning talk show for students to listen to as they get ready for classes and commuters as they drive in and out of C'Ville.

Joan Fenton | July 12, 2010 6:53 am
Offer a class in radio broadcasting Allocate a time, say from midnight to 6 am where students can be the DJ's Offer work study jobs and internships at the station. Allow students to train and get air time The music department requires students to go to a concert and write a review. Why not work with the music dept to require students to listen to a program and review it?

Mike Krueger | July 12, 2010 2:27 am
Can't argue with more students involved. But when I was an undergrad TJU mattered to me not because it was accessible or catered to my tastes but because it was challenging, serious, like nothing I had heard before. That was exciting. The college experience should serve to broaden your horizons and offer you experiences of excellence. It should give you a sense of the great range and depth of human possibility. WTJU did that for me and I hope it will continue to do that for future students.

Susanna Spencer | July 11, 2010 11:42 pm
Don't know much about this aspect, but certainly believe retaining opportunity to create original programming would be the most attractive aspect.

Alfreda Melvin | July 11, 2010 9:59 pm
Work-study internships through the music department, perhaps even the journalism department. Monthly student-based contributions from various departments - music, creative writing... let student be the stars.

J May | July 11, 2010 9:46 pm
Encourage students at their freshman orientation to volunteer at the station. Have them shadow senior DJ's, and fill in for them as time allows.

Peter Henderson | July 11, 2010 6:58 pm
Students today don't have as much free time as students of previous generations. When I was recently a student I wanted to work at the radio station but simply couldn't find time. I would be against firing the wonderful announcers we have now who aren't students. They perform a great service to the university and community and receive no compensation other than the satisfaction of a job well done. REALLY well-done! Nor should the station try to win students over by playing mainstream music. The primary service WTJU provides to students and others is to provide great music, culturally significant music, unusual music that they wouldn't hear on commercial stations and larger non-profit stations. Just as the Music Department makes room for Bach and Coltrane, and the English Department makes room for Shakespeare, so should WTJU always make room for music that serves its educational and cultural mission as part of an elite university in a culturally vibrant community.

Josh Mandell | July 11, 2010 6:55 pm
Broadcast UVA swim meets! I'm serious, this would be very cool. More student DJs. I'm sure that there are tons of UVA students with great musical tastes.

Henry Wiencek | July 11, 2010 5:48 pm
Have regular "open mike" hours available to any student or faculty member who wants to do sixty minutes on the air, with content up to the student – music, talk, whatever. Be willing to interrupt the regular schedule to open slots for them. Let them do what they want to do. Just be sure to have the tape-delay machinery working so the FCC doesn't come calling the next day.

Liz Chaldekas | July 11, 2010 3:57 pm
Have a DJ day, where students can meet the DJs and talk about their own ideas for the station.

Steve Guion | July 11, 2010 9:56 am
Better promotion of the station, i.e. posted ads around the city, promoted giveaways like contests, "be a DJ for a Day", sponsor concerts, perhaps even free ones featuring local talent, better partnership with local businesses.

Pamela Blevins | July 11, 2010 8:46 am
You can get more students involved with the station by maintaining solid classical music programming that brings composers past and present to life. Do not pander to the pop trends but rise above the mainstream and offer something more enduring. Offer students opportunities to create programs as means of learning about the music and those who create and perform it.

Vern Buchanan | July 11, 2010 7:59 am
With I pods & downloaded music this is hard to do .Kids dont listen to radio anymore unless it fits their mold ./ Which is all about me . What TJU has been doing for many years is providing an education . Looking forward is only worth a penny as long as we know where we came from

Lori Derr | July 10, 2010 8:03 pm
1)Student volunteers could apprentice with the knowledgeable jazz.classical, world music, DJS aligning their interests with the more experienced announcers. This could be part of a music appreciation class where the history of music and the development of each of the genres of music can be explored. This way you can avoid the horrible idea of repetition of the music. There are excessive opportunities for exposure to repetition of music. 2) Live student music performances could be broadcast from the studio on a regular basis. Perhaps the student jazz ensembles, student singers and singing groups, as well as the classical ensembles could have a regular slot for live performance. 3) These broadcasts could also include taped versions of the student and faculty ensembles. 4) A student internship could be offered in radio broadcasting

Aaron Zatcoff | July 10, 2010 4:20 pm
Market specifically to students, assign students to listen or participate or volunteer for credit via Scott Deveaux, John Dearth, and other faculty connections. I was a student here long ago but didn't learn of WTJU until after I graduated and was working.

kevin burns | July 10, 2010 3:42 pm
Increasing the number of student djs and maximizing the total number of djs by alternating weeks instead of the same dj every week would be one way. Also increasing promotions and ticket giveaways of local events of interest to students using student volunteer talent could help.

Prue Thorner | July 10, 2010 2:17 pm
Internships in broadcasting; program development and marketing would be valuable experiences for undergrads and graduate students from the Commerce School, English Department, Darden School, Music Department, Drama Department, to name just a few relevant areas. Presenting broadcasts of Drama Dept. productions and concerts by advanced students in Music would also be interesting.

Tim Beeghly | July 10, 2010 1:31 pm
Much more comprehensive training & a longer training period (internship)before going on the air. Building value by offering a couple of radio broadcasting courses as well as electives in Media Studies, Dept. of Music, etc. for 2nd or 3rd yr. students at UVA that would require volunteer hours be completed to receive his or her final grade.

Ruth Cross | July 10, 2010 10:48 am
Harvard's WHRV uses studenht classical DJs who compete for the privelege of having their own show. Find out how they do it in Cambridge before you so dreastically reduce the time devoted to classical music.

staiger white | July 10, 2010 10:27 am
Students could participate by nominating, producing and airing short (perhaps 5 minutes) editorial content covering historical or current information concerning genres, particular artists, arranges, etc. This content could be serialized. For a longer format, of say 30 minutes - 2 hours, students could produce specials that included samples of the topic of interest. For example, Danca Latina each week could have a student produced segment on music of a particular country. Music students could present their own work, similar to the idea of art students putting their work in a university gallery.

Dan Goldberg | July 10, 2010 10:18 am
Not being a student or involved in the University I can't comment here at all.

t davis | July 10, 2010 8:26 am
It is impossible to measure or quantify how WTJU has indubitably enhanced countless students'-- and townies -- lives. One of my most cherished memories of my time at U.Va. is of having to stay up all night working on a paper with music from WTJU's classical marathon there to not only keep me company, but to give me solace and encouragement, inspiration and transporting delight. I know of NO other radio station on the planet that plays the range and depth and variety that WTJU plays, and I value endlessly how my life -- both as a student and townie -- has been enriched by this station. It would be an error of catastrophic proportion to tamper too much with the unique breadth and scope of the music offered by the station. I have said again and again that, thanks in large part to WTJU (and WNRN), we here in Charlottesville have better and more sophisticated radio listening options than in D.C. area and other big metropolitan areas. I wish U.Va. would remember that it is not always all about money.

Jace Goodling | July 10, 2010 7:55 am
exposure to the student body in general seems to be a good start

Mark Greenfield | July 9, 2010 8:11 pm
Offer work shops in music history as it relates to radio exposure. Offer contests for best new DJs or interns, or fund raising. You have a bunch of bright kids that just want to sink their teeth into something.

Clarice Schermerhorn | July 9, 2010 5:13 pm
Don't sit around and wait for people to come to you, go to them. Sit out in front of Newcomb Hall when everybody is coming in to get their books, etc.

Will Harvey | July 9, 2010 4:22 pm
Certainly WTJU recruitment of student involvement is important, and making them aware of the incredible teaching that the DJs impart to all of us in the community about various musical genres would convey to them the tremendous benefit of getting involved. When I get into the office every day, I turn the station on so beginning at 6/6:30 A.M. until 6 or so at night and I get educated listening to music that isn't in my own library. The classical music in the morning and evening are a good way to start a day, but the other shows highlighting jazz, rock, folk etc. expand my knowledge of these other wonderful sounds.

Guinevere Higgins | July 9, 2010 1:22 pm
Connect with the music dept, the journalism dept; provide opportunities for students to shape the direction of the station and its shows. How 'bout a student sports show? What do the students currently working at the station think? What is the current status of TJU on grounds? If increasing student involvement in the station is a huge priority, why not ask the target group what they would want in the radio station that they so generously underwrite? Will students be more involved if "Roots" music makes up the majority of the station's programming? How 'bout a hip-hop show? Is the programming aligned with what students are currently interested in listening to?

A. Soroka | July 9, 2010 1:15 pm
A number of jobs at the station (e.g. recruiting underwriters or production work) could be done by interns, who might receive course credit. The WTJU web presence would benefit -enormously- from student-done work. Integration with academic classes (particularly and very obviously, in the Dep'ts of Music, Media Studies, and English) is a whole frontier that previous management failed to exploit. Why aren't students in English composition classes writing radio plays to be broadcast? Why aren't Media Studies students participating in the behind-the-scenes activities at 'TJU? Why aren't Music students writing pieces for performance or curating special shows, as assignments or simply as part of the life of that Dep't? Because they've never been invited.

Staiger White | July 8, 2010 9:14 pm
I believe that students should be able to participate at all levels, from engineering to developing ideas of content segments, like short daily editorial pieces, to being on-air. But I would be very disappointed if that meant a greater homogenization of the great variety of music and programming aired. The breadth of programming now is wonderful.

Michael Sokolowski | July 8, 2010 7:00 pm
Tap into the music department. LeRoi Moore once told me his music conservatory was the 'TJU music library. I'm a musician myself (and have been fortunate to guest on TJU many times over my career -- the last few times have been as a guest of Steve Huff on Anything Goes) and I worked at WLUR all through school, DJ'ing in most genres and directing a popular late-night show. Radio opened me up to that which I loved the most in a way that I never thought possible. I learned more about music from the staff there than from my music professors (about music appreciation, that is). It was energizing and exciting, but you don't realize it until you try it. I don't know what happens at UVA, but if there's room to improve the on-campus recruitment of people who love music, I'd certainly start there. Harness the passion that HAS to exist -- don't try to "rope" folks in. That's not what you want. And as we know, music can be an interdisciplinary study -- music informs culture, history, art and literature, while its own practice touches deeply upon mathematics, physics, acoustics, cognitive study, linguistics, etc. Weave WTJU into the academic tapestry of the school. Why couldn't any of the disciplines above partner on classroom projects via 'TJU? Someone once told me that if he were approached by an alien and asked to be shown the highest evolution of human activity, he would take him to a concert. With music in its myriad forms -- as recorded and stored -- you have plenty to work with. You just need better framing.

David J. Simpson | July 8, 2010 5:41 pm
Link broadcasts of classical and good popular music genres with music appreciation in appropriate courses (in local schools as well as at the U?) to enhance student awareness -- of fine music and of the station itself.

Mary Ann | July 8, 2010 3:28 pm
Get professors and students involved in all aspects of planning (e.g., strategic, programming), fundraising and operations through class room case studies and examples, assignments and extra credit projects. For example, the development of proposals for funding grants; Web site enhancements and App development; and art work/graphics and even videos depicting the "feel" of individual programs, along with air times, for display around campus, around town and on Cable Public Services spot.

Ron Povich | July 8, 2010 2:19 pm
WTJU needs to be better promoted through University publications, activities, affiliated organizations, and in places where students gather. Such promotion can create awareness of the station as well as inviting participation. Programming of interest to students could be highlighted. I was recently in Newcomb Hall and passed many bulletin boards, none of which mentioned WTJU.

Karen O'Brien | July 8, 2010 2:12 pm
Because working and volunteering at WTJU is such a valuable learning experience, the *University* itself should make communicating these opportunities a priority. There are so many angles: news casting, technical aspects, music, fund-raising... given the University's ability to communicate to all students, this is not hard to do.

Marietta McCarty | July 8, 2010 11:49 am
As at any university, student government and the faculty and students in the music dept. should be at the forefront; WTJU should be part of their program by design. But the job of informing the student body also belongs to the university administration and the pr employee(s) paid by WTJU.

Michele Mattioli | July 8, 2010 10:54 am
Offer educational internships at the station.

Lester Wilson | July 8, 2010 9:42 am
Many excellent suggestions are posted below. The entire spectrum of music should be played, but classical music should continue to be the hallmark of the University's radio station.

Sheryl Hayes | July 8, 2010 9:38 am
I agree that more student involvement would be a plus, but if 40% of the funding comes from student fees, then 60% must come from the rest of us--the community--who aren't complaining about the format. I depend on the morning classical programs to get my day off to a good start, and that's why I donate. If that goes away, so will my contributions. Which brings up another question: have you surveyed your listeners to find out whether they are student or community? If 40% of the listeners are students (and the previous comments lead me to believe there are student listeners) and 40% of the funding comes from student fees, then perhaps that's an appropriate balance. I love the morning DJ's. They make this station unique--their distinctive styles, and the fact that they are volunteers. Make some minor changes if you must, but please don't change the format too much. I'd hate to lose and old friend.

Cyndy Williams | July 8, 2010 9:16 am
offer some type of perk for the volunteer service through the university

Jeff Carlin | July 8, 2010 8:44 am
First off, WTJU needs to have more of a presence among students - I think the majority are at most vaguely aware that the teej even exists. Secondly, there are lots of brilliant faculty and grad students at UVa with tons of great teaching/research ideas. In collaboration with these folks, use (or create?) synergy between WTJU programming and UVa course offerings to devise class projects that (a) expose WTJU to the students, and (b) spread the word about excellent teaching and research at UVa. Also, outreach/marketing is severely lacking at WTJU -- work with marketing, commerce, etc. faculty to develop internships where students receive UVa credit while working at marketing and procuring underwriting for WTJU.

Mable Kinzie | July 8, 2010 8:04 am
Ask to be part of a mailing to admitted students before they arrive on-grounds. Be a part of student orientations. Have a DJ booth outside on grounds during move-in day. Get on the roster for activities in the dorms. --> First-year students are looking for a way to connect with their peers and be involved in meaningful activities. They can bring their energies and enthusiasm as volunteers and to help think of ways that WTJU can be interwoven into the fabric of their lives.

Colin Campbell | July 7, 2010 10:14 pm
Students need to be included in the station without having to match the lofty musical-knowledge base of the station's existing group of volunteers. Broadening the station's rock programming would do a lot to achieve this. When you require students to present you a sample playlist of extremely obscure music before that person is considered, you're severely limiting your pool of student volunteers. Encouraging, and allowing for, a more well-known assortment of indie rock music (think CMJ) would get more students involved; as would the addition of more rap/hip-hop programming (wouldn't have to be mainstream necessarily). Look to N.C. State's thriving radio station, WKNC, as an example of how students can be a major part of the station while still attracting a broad audience. Branding the entire station as "roots/americana" would likely only alienate students, as it would appeal to a minority, and for that matter, not a terribly diverse minority of the student body.

Sarah (A & S, 1984) | July 7, 2010 9:34 pm
Do a better job of promoting the station to the students. When I was an undergraduate, virtually everyone I knew listened to TJU. Forge linkages with our wonderful music department. Let students know that there are opportunities for them to participate in programming. WTJU serves a educative function to the students and I cannot imagine that changing the format to the proposed schedule will increase student participation or interest.

Valerie Matthews | July 7, 2010 8:12 pm
Make them aware of the station and its diversity. I believe very strongly in keeping young and old minds open, and certainly not trying to adjust to their same old comfort level. For instance -I have listened off and on since the 80's to the Crank of Dawn and he has some really forward looking ideas that can wake young and old minds up a bit.

William Shoup | July 7, 2010 6:32 pm
I've listened to WTJU since dirt started. Who needs another stinking commercial station, we already have enough of them. If you really want to go over to the dark side you could start a Christian born-again station.

Bev Ogilvie | July 7, 2010 5:16 pm
Encourage students to attend/participate in the many classical music opportunities in our culturally rich community.

ned oldham | July 7, 2010 5:09 pm
Make the hands-on student opportunities more fun; the current student-produced news segments are boring and sound more like advertisements for classes than news; allow gutsier coverage. For music, publicize the fact that anyone with a laptop has the technology in hand to produce a really cool show that can showcase the inventive personalities and rarely heard great music. For that matter, wtju might entice students to produce more creative news/feature stories on their own time, with some guidance from station-mentors. I'm talking about using programs like apple's garageband to create multitracked, well-produced music and news segments. One reason there is so much great music available now is that the technology is so cheap and in everybody's hands; so while offering to teach students how to use the amazing power of the airwaves via the wtju studio, wtju should also take advantage of the technology to which current students are natives.

Josh Krahn | July 7, 2010 4:36 pm
Start by letting students program music that is relevant to them. From what I can tell, that means Rock, Hip-hop and Electronic. What is Roots? Sounds like stuff middle-aged people like because it makes them feel "authentic." Also: get the Music department involved in programming. Stick to the educational mission; don't just try to placate the BoV with a boring non-offensive Americana format. This might play well on Parents Weekend, but it's not going to inspire undergrads to get involved.

Margaret Lee | July 7, 2010 3:22 pm
I have only recently become aware that WTJU offers classical music. I had not found any radio station for this here yet. I listen to WNRN acoustic sunrise and often, 106.1 corner. However, I would LOVE it if you could play classical at certain times and days, and then I would listen. I donate to my other stations!

Peter Welch | July 7, 2010 3:17 pm
You can start by letting students know the station exists. This doesn't require a format change, it simply requires more attention to promotion and collaboration with university departments.

Holly | July 7, 2010 2:54 pm
By introducing student and other listeners to a wide range of music through DJ-initiated programming, WTJU enhances their educational experiences.

Cindy Benton-Groner | July 7, 2010 1:49 pm
Invite students to serve as interns and possibly DJs. Survey them directly for their ideas. Broadcast important UVA events live on the radio. Encourage faculty to have music that relates to their academic courses aired.

Bob Girard | July 7, 2010 12:52 pm
In spite of what people may think,. this station is UVA owned and run by volunteers. The question as to how best interest students is to ask the students, not me. So far I haven't heard of student discontent about their lack of voice. It's something that they can access or participate in, like intramurals or a film series.

Erika Herz | July 7, 2010 12:20 pm
Perhaps you already do this but partner with a communications professor and get students involved as part of an ongoing course.

Bridge Cox | July 7, 2010 11:10 am
unfortunately, I feel that you can't force students these days to participate in events that they don't want to. You can't account for them and can't hope that they show up - because sometimes, they simply won't. I feel more that student awareness is more important. WTJU just needs more of a face to the university. We need to promote ourselves WITHIN the university instead of trying to force ourselves upon the students. That way, the kids will know that they can hike up to Lambeth and come help, but under their own accord and will.

Mitchell Oliver ('13) | July 7, 2010 9:21 am
Let them know what WTJU is. Do not change what it is at the core, yes the way things are run could use some serious over-haul, but keep things more on the side of fine-tuning then rebuilding. Ninety percent of my friends (students) have never heard of TJU when I mention it, but once I talk about it for a few minutes they are hooked. There are tons of potential opportunities (marketing, fundraising/underwriting, public affairs, university correspondents, etc) for students that can be created if TJU would open up to the university. I have had several professors interested in TJU and explain how they wish they could include it in their curriculum (for example, my Technosonics class with Matthew Burtner (he brought in Matmos, even) had to make podcasts on iTunes when we could have potentially done a radio broadcast??). It's really quite ridiculous how inaccessible the station is, and not because of content or anything like that, but because of management.

Peter Brunjes | July 7, 2010 8:49 am
Tough question, but the obvious answer is more outreach to students and advertising. The biggest draw of WTJU is its huge diversity of programs. Perhaps that can be a catalyst for more student involvement. For example, there is an increasing interest in global studies-- can the station align existing programming with these efforts?

J. M. | July 7, 2010 2:21 am
When I started going to UVA, I knew I wanted to get involved in radio. However, I had no idea that WTJU was a station. I could not tell it apart from WUVA. I suggest at least a booth at the activities fair so students know they are able to get involved with the station and that it is an entirely separate entity from WUVA.

Rusty Trainham | July 7, 2010 12:26 am
Up through the 1980's the majority of WTJU staff were students. Has this changed? If so, then more students need to be recruited.

active community member | July 6, 2010 10:00 pm
Maybe students listen and that is enough! Plenty of student fees support things students don't attend, or in which they do not engage....that's OK. What do students think of the station? How does the station serve the community?

Susan Webb | July 6, 2010 7:26 pm
Continue to broadcast classical music interpreted by interested and knowledgeable community members to raise their awareness of this profoundly valuable resource.

Becky Calvert | July 6, 2010 6:53 pm
Let them know you're there? Also realize that most of the support for WTJU comes from not the students, but the locals in your community!

Content Sablinsky | July 6, 2010 6:22 pm
All you need to do is attend a performance of the University Singers under Michael Slon's direction to understand how students - those who are singing and those in the audience - find "classical" music electrifying. Harnass this energy! Surely closer cooperation with the McIntire Department of Music could "increase student participation."

Rick Kast | July 6, 2010 5:35 pm
A number of years ago when I was a student here I heard WTJU and thought I'd like to do a classical music show. I wrote to the station manager and expressed an interest and ended up doing a show. It seems to me that's the way it should work. You can't beat people over the head to make them do something they have no interest in and you shouldn't try. The important thing is to have the resource available for those who are interested and student fees seem an entirely appropriate way to do this. If the interest is in dramatically changing the station to make it appeal to more students, that approach will, I think, destroy a unique community resource and duplicate efforts that need no duplication.

Richard Guy Wilson | July 6, 2010 3:34 pm
keep the classical element...do not cut it out...that is what makes it special and plently of students like it.

Emily Sloan | July 6, 2010 3:28 pm
More rock hours! Students are not going to be willing to file records or do paperwork if they can't get on the air.

Alison Booth | July 6, 2010 3:09 pm
Encourage faculty to assign audio essays that could be broadcast on themed shows. Encourage talk-show formats for educational issues.

Michaux Hood | July 6, 2010 1:51 pm
Having the station as a resource that students can listen to is a substantial service if listening is part of being involved with the station. Also, coordinating with professors who have ideas of using the station as a resource could generate some great answers to this question!

Michael D. Mabry (Law 1991) | July 6, 2010 1:24 pm
What a disappointing first question. Why not ask: “How can we increase student participation at the Rotunda?” Replace the library with a cafeteria? Perhaps straighten out the roof for a more contemporary look? If you think that’s outrageous, then you begin to understand the uproar over the changes you are proposing for WTJU. Whether you realize it or not – and it would appear that you do not – WTJU is also one of the University’s great cultural treasures, and one that has now gained a national and international reputation through the internet. For those students (and the wider non-student community) with deep musical interests outside the mainstream, the Station is an invaluable and unique resource, and it is the rich and varied contributions of the all-volunteer staff that make it so. It certainly opened my ears to new musical possibilities when I was a student 20 years ago, and it continues to do so today. It would be a gross abuse of stewardship for the University to dismantle one of its finest cultural achievements simply to pander to mainstream tastes. But laughably transparent questions like this one make me despair that this forum is nothing more than a cynical means to blow off steam, to be disregarded when the bulldozers roll in.

Davis Salisbury | July 6, 2010 1:08 pm
Well, if the goal is to increase student participation, then providing them with hours that they may get excited about (i.e., not just 11:00 pm-3:00 am) would go a long way. The students are primarily going to get excited about playing Rock, but of course if they want to play Jazz or Classical or Folk, then there should be opportunities there for them as well. There have always been students involved with Rock programming, however, so I think this department has done a great job. It also does not seem that the University makes much of an effort to inform the students about opportunities at the station. Perhaps if more initiatives involving academic credit and real resume building opportunities were made available to the students, then more involvement would be achieved. I do not think that drastically changing the nature of the programming would be the answer to this, however (or certainly not the sole answer).

Hal Dean | July 6, 2010 10:58 am
First, encourage them to pursue academic freedom - in keeping with Jeffersonian principles. Expose them to music beyond their comfort zone by requiring aspiring DJs to put together radio shows in at least 4 different styles or categories. Engage them in a truly democratic process, wherein the station is manged transparently and decisions are made by an informed and inclusive group.

Brian Glover | July 6, 2010 10:45 am
Honestly, I don't think higher undergraduate participation should be a big priority. Now, I am a former college radio staffer -- I worked at WAMH-Amherst, which is ENTIRELY student run, all through my four undergraduate years. So, I know what a college station needs: dedicated, enthusiastic DJs who genuinely love the music they play. As far as I know, those students who meet that description are already welcome to work at WTJU if they choose to do so. It will do no good to lower the station's standards in order to bring in people who don't really want to be there anyway. The best way WTJU can enhance the educational experience of undergrads is to expose them to music and ideas they wouldn't find on their own. I think WTJU's DJs -- undergrads, grads, faculty, staff, community members -- do an excellent job with this mission.

kay slaughter | July 6, 2010 10:03 am
Advertise volunteer opportunities through music department, drama department and communications classes. Also consider getting students from PVCC involved by having a PVCC volunteers program (many PVCC students go on to UVa so this could be a recruiting ground). Maybe have a student-run "talk program"

delores herring | July 6, 2010 8:07 am
Increase the classical music. It is beautiful and necessary in today's world.

John Dean | July 6, 2010 12:15 am
WTJU's greatest strength has been the musical sophistication and enthusiasm of its volunteer staff, in all musical genres. I believe that this strength should be the foundation for change at the station instead of trying out some new programming gimmicks. I think it is very important to involve students -- but it is also important to notice that young people don't look to radio as much as they used to for cutting-edge pop music. This may mean that the historical importance of alternative rock music at WTJU may need to be re-evaluated. Since rock music is well covered by other (currently more successful) stations, it may be that WTJUs niche may be in other areas. While fewer students are interested in classical music, or jazz or folk music, than are interested in pop, there are students at UVa who love these musics too. To build a community around one or more of these musical genres would give WTJU a new mission that could help to meet the station's goals, and also benefit the local cultural environment. In the 1980's WTJU sponsored a lot of jazz concerts, which succeeded in helping to develop a community for jazz in town, among students and other local people. I mention these concerts as an example of how the station could be looking outward, to the supporters of WTJU's music. I think that a focus on music other than rock would more likely succeed than to simply try to convert the station into a clone of WNRN. That would doom the station to failure.

David Robinson | July 5, 2010 10:44 pm
Let them know you exist.

Cal Glattfelder | July 5, 2010 9:12 pm
Tell the students that you want them involved as soon as they arrive this fall through the student union or some sort of university mailing. Once you get them through the door they can see the opportunities you offer. You could offer to pair up djs as an apprenticeship for thew new student volunteers.

Malcolm Bell | July 5, 2010 7:08 pm
Music majors, performance students, and orchestra/group members could be invited to consider becoming classical announcers, working perhaps as interns and developing ideas for programs. Present announcers in public service messages could concentrate on musical events at the University and in town that might be of interest to students, or already involve students.

Sally Thomas | July 5, 2010 6:35 pm
Let's not set up goals without deciding if they are relevant ones. WTJU is at least partially a community service of UVA -- how can it do that job better? In my opinion, that's a more valid question, and might lead to suggestions for changing the funding source, rather than judging the station on its student involvement.

Harvey Liszt | July 5, 2010 5:55 pm
Students should be required to pay these fees in person in dimes at the bursar's office so that they get a better feeling for how much the fees actually are and where they go. Their educational experience would be much enhanced by beefing up the arts at UVA -- dance, music, fine arts -- at the expense of the current emphasis on sports and vocational education in business, commerce and "law". With this kind of improved education. students might actually have something to say on the radio

Phil Stokes | July 5, 2010 5:38 pm
Be honest, you don't care how many people listen to the station, you care how much money you bring in to pay for everything. Applying logic, you should do what your biggest donors tell you to do. Your Arbitron rating is irrelevant, since you're not selling advertising anyway (hopefully you're not considering...) It's unusual for a college station to be profitable, and Charlottesville already has plenty of rock stations. Finally, students don't listen to the radio, they stream music off the web. To improve student participation, bring more music students on air to play live. Radio may stage a comeback with live programming - it's technically much better suited to broadcast live content than any online method.

Ann Benner | July 5, 2010 5:32 pm
Survey students to find out the kinds of music they want to hear on WTJU, and the kinds of commentary or informational programs they would like to hear. This survey should be conducted annually.

Susie McRae | July 5, 2010 4:17 pm
Internships with the station, something to get fraternities and sororities involved like a short weekly "newscast", a show devoted to student's top songs of the week. How do students learn about the station, do something to advertise directly to them.

greg wichelns | July 5, 2010 4:16 pm
UVA should consider alternatives to the student fee support of the station. Radio is a wonderful venue for free speech, creative musical arts, world exploration, etc..... Certainly TJ's university should be promoting this rather than volume of listernership. Say no to "opiates (programmed rock) for the masses".

Zack Perdue | July 5, 2010 3:58 pm
Work directly with the music department. Much of the programming is chosen by really knowledgeable staff which should appeal to music majors and students taking music courses.

Tina Eshleman | July 5, 2010 12:00 pm
I don't see how decreasing rock programming and just having it on late at night is going to increase student interest. I also think UVa should do more to make student aware of WTJU when they arrive on campus. Maybe a big WTJU-sponsored outdoor concert at the beginning of the year would help. Students should be encouraged to volunteer at the station, or at least be made aware of the opportunities to do so.

Bob Williamson | July 5, 2010 10:59 am
On the morning jazz shows have, more often, local or other jazz musicians to talk about the music and specific recordings to humanized and personalize recordings and local performances to the listeners.

Jenny Wyss | July 5, 2010 8:58 am
More visibility at the student activities fair at the beginning of the year Student club - Friends of WTJU - to promote the station and draw attention to it in the student body Collaboration with the Media Studies Dept. for radio internships for students, under supervision of station manager and/or select volunteers

Amy Garrou | July 5, 2010 7:32 am
I think students usually don't know what their student fees support. They certainly don't know that their student fees help support WTJU--at least, I never knew that, as an undergraduate. I first heard WTJU in my fourth year of undergrad school, while I was working in the College Dean's office in my work-study job. The ladies in the office had TJU on the radio while they worked. I liked it so much that I made a tiny little contribution--all I could make at the time. Maybe you could reach out to UVA faculty to have shows on the air, popular faculty members in particular, so that students would be drawn to listen to their shows--whether a one-off show or a regular one. I think you need not to discount support from the community of Charlottesville, because students are not likely to be your biggest donors in fund drives. Most of them either don't have the money to do that, or aren't going to take the time to call (although they might text a contribution if that were possible). Keep the classical music and keep as much of the variety as possible, to ensure continued financial support from the community.

matthew kavanaugh | July 5, 2010 7:00 am
Give them credit.

Anna Askounis | July 5, 2010 6:33 am
Find those students (from the Admissions Office) who have worked in radio before coming to U.Va. and/or those who want to major in communications, journalism, broadcasting, etc. and invite them to join...put out a table at the freshman orientation programs staffed by a student inviting them to join...put a flyer in information mailed home to first year students...

Pat Davis | July 4, 2010 9:21 pm
WTJU has enriched my life because of its breadth and depth inclusion of all kinds of music. To focus on one genre of music, such as rock, seems unfair, even to those who love only rock. As a classical music lover, I've had my horizons expanded by WTJU's diversity and have found entertainment and meaning in many of the rock and jazz segments to which I possibly would otherwise have had little or no exposure. I would hate to think that rock music lovers wouldn't have this same journey into other places of music available to them! Pat Davis Music professional

Peter McElhinney | July 4, 2010 5:47 pm
Rather than keep the tried and true advocacy of unpopular music, have an early evening and late night student-hosted show with a trans-genre mix of music.

Brigitte&Goetz Hardtmann | July 4, 2010 5:20 pm
How about asking UVA students to develop programs which teach music to younger listeners. I am thinking of L Bernstein's music program of the 70 ties (?).

Charles Choi | July 4, 2010 2:30 pm
Establish a new media program that embraces online distribution at WTJU that enables multi-disciplinary outreach with different academic departments. With online distribution, WTJU has a fantastic opportunity to engage with the University on a multi-disciplinary basis where it can offer "real-world" problems to interested departments. For example possible areas of engagement include: - Online Music Licensing: Work with the Law and Commerce departments provide a survey and recommendations for licensing - Social Media Marketing: Work with English, Media Studies, Psychology and Commerce departments on audience engagement via social media - Search and Analytics: Work with Math and CS departments on search of content and statistical analysis of usage of WTJU - Web Services: Work with CS department and ITC on architecture of a multi-platform media distribution (web, mobile) - Revenue Generation: Work with CS and Commerce school to explore revenue generation via direct contribution and affiliate referrals for music

Randy May | July 4, 2010 12:57 pm
There should be more "written" or advertised literature that the tj is always looking for student volunteers and involvement. Any departmental links should be examined more closely, such as THE MUSIC DEPT.,Any Journalism students to add to the news of the station, possibly looking at the Com school for any marketing input. The option of having a senior project geared toward broadcast or journalism based interests could be a draw for some were it available.

Jay Kardan | July 4, 2010 9:58 am
By all means include students. Be aware, however, that students usually cannot make the year-round commitment necessary to become announcers.

Beth Hodsdon | July 4, 2010 9:42 am
--Soliciting volunteers from students in music courses at the University --setting up outdoor broadcastings on the Lawn --soliciting volunteers from UVA student extracurricular music groups --broadcasting student performances ---All the ideas already expressed, by people who have more experience

Marva Barnett | July 4, 2010 8:18 am
You have already heard from Music Department faculty encouraging a closer connection between WTJU and the Music Department, which has ongoing success in engaging students with music in a wide variety of ways (managing concerts, ushering, performing, etc.). Why not, for instance, dedicate some WTJU time to broadcasting student performances; students could organize the entire event. U.Va. has stunningly engaged students!

Mary Anna Dunn | July 4, 2010 8:18 am
I work with UVA volunteers in the organization I run. I find it takes a lot of outreach to bring them in. It also helps a great deal to have some short term opportunities available. A lot have difficulty maintaining long term commitments. Help them see this as a way to have a lot of fun and meet people. Provide opportunities to volunteer in groups. They are at least as interested in finding a social niche as they are in helping. Make sure they find one with TJU.

Nancy Summers | July 3, 2010 3:46 pm
I especially like WTJU's classical programming. Students with interests in classical music or studying classical music might be given credit to intern with experienced classical broadcasters. I can imagine assignments being given in music courses to create a two hour program of classical music that could be aired on WTJU....The very individual character of shows on WTJU is extremely appealing and interesting. I think students could be involved in this. The music department is an obvious place to start, but I'm interdisciplinary possibilities also exist.

Joan Carrara | July 3, 2010 2:02 pm
Not being in touch with the student body in any capacity, I don't have any insight into getting more students involved with the station. I do think WTJU should continue to offer a variety of musical genres, including classical music, to appeal to a diverse listening audience. I'm sure there isn't just one type of music that appeals to all of the students. I would think that one of your goals should be to broaden the musical taste of the students.

Dave Rogers | July 3, 2010 12:43 pm
The music programming is educational. Certainly we should recruit volunteers from the student body to do shows and public affairs, etc.

Elizabeth Benzinger | July 3, 2010 10:52 am
From what I hear from my young friends, students don't listen to radio much anymore. So I doubt if they're interested in careers in radio. But there are other things WTJU might offer students of today: I could see some serious links with departments like history, music, art, various literatures (not just English but French, German, Italian, Slavic, oriental Languages) encouraging students to look at the music from various cultures and time periods. We announcers are very open to programming suggestions and I, for one, would welcome a chance to work with a student on a show devoted to French music from the period of Impressionism, for example, or "degenerate" music, which was banned by the Nazis, or music from the Enlightenment, or the Age of Jefferson, or something of the sort. I see one comment is that students could be given credit for volunteering at WTJU. As a former high school teacher I can appreciate what a powerful motivator this practice would be. If it were linked to course work in some way, the educational rewards would be almost limitless.

Elizabeth | July 3, 2010 9:28 am
Currently the rock dept has the most student involvement, which isn't surprising since most college students listen to rock. So-- to expand student involvement, expand the rock dept. Increase rock airtime, not decrease. Students will listen more and want to participate. Also, find a way to give students course credit for their work.

Liz Courain | July 3, 2010 9:06 am
Attend UVA Student Activities Fair, Have current student volunteers recruit there and elsewhere, promote UVA student events as PSAs, start a feature like WINAs Plug Away Mondays when STUDENTS speak briefly about some non-profit event their group is sponsoring. Student organizations contribute greatly to the community but get very little media; WTJU could capitalize on this gap and become the station of choice to learn not only what is going on, but give the students on-air time to talk about what they are doing and why. Look for natural links with Music Department; feature student performers in each genre as live guests. Promote these externally on the music department's weekly email of concerts.

Erik | July 3, 2010 8:56 am
I actually think that the station would serve students better by becoming more professional, so that students would have the valuable experience of working in broadcasting. When I travel around the country and listen to other student-run or university NPR stations, I'm always impressed at how amateurish our WTJU sounds. Some think that's an advantage, but I disagree.

Don Stock | July 3, 2010 1:02 am
Hook up with www.last.fm. Do young people even listen to over-the-air radio anymore?

Fletcher Stevens | July 3, 2010 12:12 am
Why don't you cover UVa athletic or other activities?

Judith Thomas | July 2, 2010 11:31 pm
Students in Music composition courses could showcase their work in juried shows. Students from Hoos News or other students groups might want to produce weekly shows/podcasts. The musicology courses (like Scott DeVeaux's hugely popular History of Jazz) could perhaps include the programming of a radio show as a course project.

Willian Kestler | July 2, 2010 10:22 pm
Get more involved with the music department. Listeners as well as music majors would benefit from a focused approach in the areas of thematic programming, commentary and interviews. The current announcers do that very well, but I'm sure they'd love the help and could offer guidance to new recruits.

Deborah Murray | July 2, 2010 6:39 pm
A number of suggestions have already been made such as student internships and forging better links with the Music Department, and I would agree with these. In terms of educational experience, when I was an undergraduate here in the 1970s, I discovered WTJU and became an avid listener; I credit the station with significantly enhancing my knowledge and appreciation of classical music. The exposure to diverse programming of whatever genre is an educational experience in and of itself; what we need to do is do a better job of reaching out to students and the community.

Judith Shatin | July 2, 2010 4:11 pm
Create interactions between WTJU and the Music Department, so that musical offerings can include more of the music that students are hearing in our diverse course offerings. Keep up the educational component.

Eric Wiland | July 2, 2010 3:32 pm
Market what's distinctive about WTJU more aggressively.

Lisa Reeder | July 2, 2010 2:49 pm
Attach WTJU activities to existing activities and disciplines around grounds -- for instance, fundraising as a Madison House volunteer activity; bridges between the successful and acclaimed Jazz Department and jazz programming (like a 'history of jazz' show on a marathon); more airtime devoted to 'news' broadcasting from any number of UVa sources (disciplines, clubs, student organizations, etc.).

Ellen | July 2, 2010 2:13 pm
Offering small blocks of programming time would allow for students to create and manage functioning (and successful) shows. 3 hours is a lot of time for students to dedicate to a show, but they could prep and operate for 1 hour.

Jeffrey Fisher | July 2, 2010 12:54 pm
Get them to learn something about rock music! Rock programming is an opportunity to teach people about the history and development of rock music, including the really exploratory stuff that doesn't just cater to least common denominator tastes and reinforce homogeneity. It encourages the students themselves to be more creative and experimental, that they don't have to play life or music according to a formula. Who else can or should do this but an educational institution?

byrron robitaille | July 2, 2010 12:48 pm
One benefit of this kerfluffle is that I have learned of new station, KALX, UC Berkeley. Their website is welcoming, informative, friendly and charming. TheWTJU website is cold and off-putting, and seems to discourage participation. Here is KALX philosophy: "As part of our mission to educate, every KALX dj is encouraged to play a variety of musical styles and genres rather than segregating music into limited boxes. This philosophy is an attempt to entertain the listener while broadening their musical experience. Apretty fun way to be educated, doncha think?"

Mary Dykes | July 2, 2010 11:47 am
Be more visible on campus. Program student forums and university events. Ask the students what they'd like. Give them credit for working at the station.

Liz Rhodes | July 2, 2010 10:09 am
Many Students do not know WTJU exists, WTJU's marketing needs to focus on when students first come to the university by first sponsoring events, having their logo on banners, websites, the university's paper. Visibility will create an awareness. Remember that most of these first year students will not come to UVA with a radio or cars. WTJU needs to focus on a podcast for their shows and make them available on the web. While marketing build awareness, the directors can gain student involvement by visiting classes and talking with professors in related subjects.

Aaron Margosis | July 2, 2010 1:57 am
The station probably needs to start ensuring that at least X% of the on-air staff (in toto) are current undergraduate or graduate students. (Where X is TBD.)

Jeff Roberts | July 2, 2010 1:36 am
First-off don't remove the educational potential from the format itself. The station currently presents jazz, ethnic, and classical music accompanied by erudite, informed commentary that won't be heard elsewhere. Any answer to this question would be similar to those obtained from "How do we get students to attend: theatre, classical performances, guest lecturers?" Or "How do we increase attendance at sports events whose revenue consistently falls way short of expenditures, such as track & field, wrestling, and field hockey. This is not the low-hanging fruit, and, to mix metaphors, you can't always even lead a horse to water much less make it drink.

George Dayton | July 1, 2010 8:01 pm
This suggestion has the dual purpose of increasing student involvement and community outreach. Most students are not aware UVA even has a radio station, so we can be sure most of the community isn't aware of us either. Instead of broadcasting headline news - as has been proposed - WTJU should be doing features about local events or issues. This shouldn't be local news headlines, but a more detailed look single topics in the entire listening area. Examples could include school board meetings, bond issues, zoning proposals, etc, but could also include events such as the opening of a new art exhibit, a local music festival, the release of a new wine at a local vineyard, even success of a local high school team or play. I'm sure creative people could come up with much more than this. To do this, UVA should tap a resource no other station in the area has: it's students. UVA faculty could develop a program - for credit! - where seniors or grad students go out into the community and produce content for WTJU feature broadcasts to air at regular times. Each project would require background research, a site trip(s) for interviews/content, write-up, production and editing (the last 2 at WTJU facilities). Faculty guidance and oversight of the projects would be necessary and broadcast time (4-5 minute segments) would be available based on student participation. Multiple broadcasts per student or student team per semester would be required. Such an initiative helps meet 2 of UVA's mission objectives: student involvement and community outreach. Linking educational opportunities for students to WTJU is a good way to generate student interest in the station. It also provides a unique opportunity for students to engage a bit of community life that will help provide perspective for them regardless of the community they eventually settle in. From the community perspective, covering local news/events is a good way make it aware of the station and what we do. Giving local organizations (schools, non-profits, businesses, etc) a voice on the radio would be a big deal to them and draw in people connected to those places. This wouldn't reach them by the thousands, but by the dozens. People would tune in to hear about themselves and their friends/neighbors. Once they learned about us and tuned in for personal reasons, maybe some would stay for the music. Thus, this program also has the potential to help increase listeners which, in turn, increases the pool of potential donors and makes us more attractive to potential underwriters. If effective, I question whether any other local radio station could match a local outreach program like this due to resource constraints. Over time, such regular features could put the 'community' in community radio for WTJU.

Jack Andrews | July 1, 2010 5:42 pm
The Swing scene seems to picking up. Charles Peale does a wonderful job with his Rhythm and Romance which leaves room for Modern swing including Big Bands of this era. Suggest you get a list of the DJs and their specialties to the students. If you are studying late at night. your type music might be on right then.

Gwen Loehr | July 1, 2010 12:16 pm
I know the students of the University are important to reach. I'd just like to say that your loyal non-student listeners are important, too. Please don't forget/ignore this part of your support.

Scott Cohen | July 1, 2010 11:49 am
Obviously, student participation is vital. But this is strange question. Frankly it is either poorly written or loaded with an agenda. What does funding have to do with participation? The question seems framed to suggest that student don't participate in %40 of the operations. How much student participation exists already? It is unclear to me that students don't participate. Thinking of the station as a corporation, %40 is probably the largest shareholder but not the majority. The question seems to suggest that the station isn't a student & community radio station. What class of FCC license does the station hold?

Michael Brooks | July 1, 2010 1:04 am
Bring back the graveyard shift. BCC News from 3-6 AM is wasteful and a lost opportunity. Pair students in graveyard shifts and alternate pairs each week.

Kirsten Schofield | June 30, 2010 8:36 pm
Have a booth at the student activity fair and have someone friendly staff it. One of the most frequent complaints I heard was that the rock department was intimidating to approach. Have more daytime visibility for the rock department and a few shows with a younger focus in the folk and jazz departments. There are a ton of UVA students who don't even know TJU is something they CAN be involved with. Finally, WTJU should make like a commercial station and show up at other events to spread the word. There should always be a booth at Fridays after Five, but also at parents weekend, at home football games, etc. We aren't above that.

Katherine Perdue | June 30, 2010 8:35 pm
When I was a student at UVA up until 3 years ago, a lot of people didn't know the station existed. I knew about it because I'd heard it mentioned frequently at the Prism Coffee House and ardently desired to listen to it...but I couldn't pick it up in my dorm at the IRC or later in my apartment on JPA. I don't know whether reception is still a problem...certainly it doesn't need to be now that WTJU is streaming. But letting students know that it exists, possibly as part of 1st year orientation, might be a good idea. I don't remember WTJU having much presence at the Activities Fair either, though I might have missed it. I took several music classes and don't remember it ever being mentioned. I think collaborating with the music department or collaborating to a greater extent would be helpful.

James Ford | June 30, 2010 4:24 pm
I don't mean to disparage the other music departments at the station, but the Rock Department is the genre most likely to be of interest to the student demographic; more prominent daytime slots for Rock Programming (rather than eliminating daytime rock altogether, as proposed now) would drastically increase student listenership, and therefore student involvement. So the Rock Department is the Department most likely to attract Students -- but with the proposed drastic reduction in the Rock schedule, it seems there is hardly any room left on the air for the existing volunteers, much less additional student volunteers. Furthermore, WTJU's freeform programming makes it unique among local radio stations, and the major draw for both potential listeners and potential volunteers. This is what makes the station Educational, rather than commercial. Retaining this aspect of WTJU's programming is essential if we are to be of any interest whatsoever to the student body. Students interested in Rock (and its various subgenres) are hardly going to be excited about the prospect of volunteering at a station which plays the exact same pre-programmed material as other local rock stations, but only does so late at night.

Terry Stegman | June 30, 2010 3:31 pm
Hook up students as apprentices to the excellent on air programmers and personalities. WTJU is unique in its programming and atmosphere and this should be shared, not changed.

Jane Foster | June 30, 2010 3:29 pm
Sorry, I have no ideas for attracting students. I think WTJU is very important to many of us older citizens and I have always been very grateful to UVA for sponsoring the wonderful music.

Bill Davis | June 30, 2010 3:21 pm
Develop a 15-30 second PSA with snippets from the musical diversity heard on TJU and send out a campus-wide email or get someone to Robo-call students on their cellphones...

Elizabeth Hull | June 30, 2010 2:52 pm
Students at WTJU receive an enhanced musical education through other djs and through the research they must do for Marathon shows. Graduate students and community members educate student members into good community practices as well as into the history, diversity, and future, of musics.

Walt Rodney | June 30, 2010 1:34 pm
First and foremost, reduce administrative costs to increase efficiency in student fee money spent. How to get more students to work at TJU? Recruit like any other organization on Grounds does. "Rush up" students, even, like other organizations do. How to get more students to listen? Keep playing great music and increase marketing of the individual programs and the station.

Claire Kaplan | June 30, 2010 1:03 pm
Offer internships with specific training opportunities (DJ, tech, etc.) with academic credit. Also, perhaps host a call-in show on student matters--with someone who can host a lively, controversial but informative program.

Byron Robitaille | June 30, 2010 12:00 pm
The Business Planning Presentation states that the goal is to double the number of student volunteers. If each current student volunteer entices a friend, Voila! participation doubles. As to enhancing educational experience, that's what classes are for- volunteering at the radio station should be fun.

Patricia Price | June 30, 2010 11:45 am
Having looked at the marketing of various university “services” to students, I would say the most appropriate and fruitful tack would directly involve faculty and the classes they teach. There are many solo and group assignments and projects suitable for a wide variety of majors and discliplines.

Virginia Germino | June 30, 2010 10:26 am
Encouraging the Music Department to recruit promising announcers? You might find some students who are interested in learning about the great music from ancient to radically modern, and sharing their knowledge and preferences with their cohort. Everyone learns by doing, not just by passive listening. Active performers could use the forum to expose their peers to what's available at UVa and in the community. Students need WTJU far more than they now realize; it should be part of their civilized education.

Shana Goldin-Perschbacher | June 30, 2010 10:12 am
Graduate students are much more likely to figure out that WTJU exists, listen, and get involved (or know someone who has a show and tune in regularly). Grad students stick around longer and get out more, so pick up on these things. I worked with first year UVA undergraduates in the dorms for 5 years when I was a grad student. I learned that the incoming class connects way before school starts via Facebook, and continues to stay connected (through dorms and other groups) using Facebook. Figure out a way to tap into their Facebook community. Reach out to professors who are teaching classes where the students might be able to do a project that contributes to the station in some way. For example, a sociology course (like Carey Sargent's) on community service in the arts could create an audio report about their projects in the community (with interviews from local participants, some of whom may not be WTJU listeners but whose friends would tune in if they were on the air). Or a history or anthropology course on a particular part of the world could share some of the music that's come up in class conversation. Students doing a semester abroad could send in an audio postcard from wherever they are. Talk to Nick Rubin about getting the Music Department and the Media Studies Program more involved. Ask Scott DeVeaux if you could broadcast some of his really engaging History of Jazz lectures. The WTJU listeners I know love tuning in and learning something and being surprised by what they hear.

mary jo ayers | June 30, 2010 7:17 am
WTJU IS ONE OF THE BEST KEPT SECRETS IN THE UNIVERSITY COMMUNITY AND THE CHARLOTTESVILLE, PARTICULARLY THAT YOU STREAM LIVE ON THE INTERNET.

Rick Mangione | June 30, 2010 2:16 am
Statements published by UVA describing the experiences of successful former and current WTJU djs and other volunteers

Jim Jones | June 29, 2010 11:13 pm
If it isn't broken don't mess with it.

Leni Sorensen | June 29, 2010 9:44 pm
I agree with Sandy Snyder - make sure the students actually know the station exists! Play it over the Newcome Hall PA system. Stream it via the UVA website.

Melissa | June 29, 2010 9:40 pm
Small fellowships for genre directors or other more demanding volunteer positions. Advertising to students during orientation and large events. Having a presence at sporting events, foxfield, Fridays after five, etc. Interfacing with some of the media studies and music departments to get the word out.

Richard Leahy | June 29, 2010 9:38 pm
I'm not sure but I think it would be a mistake to limit programming to an idea of what someone thinks undergratduate students want, exclusively; remember there are graduate students, faculty, staff and alumni (not to mention community members) who are important constituencies for WTJU.

Laura | June 29, 2010 8:57 pm
mentor and internship programs! although all the previous suggestions are great!

Cafe Lady | June 29, 2010 8:54 pm
There are so many efforts within UVa to create interdisciplinary programs, tailored to the interests of undergrads and graduate students - myself included. WTJU can be an integral part of an interdisciplinary study in Public Relations, Journalism, Education, Music, and Engineering. When I receive official UVa glossy promos, at NO TIME do I EVER see anything about WTJU. Why not? I think the powers-that-be who are instigating this dramatic, and potentially bloody, alteration in programming have no idea, no clue as to the power this radio station has in it's volunteers. A wealth of passion and knowledge has been perking under it's roof for years, basically untapped, and unappreciated. Stop trying to fix what actually works - how about fixing the approach UVa has towards WTJU?

Susanna | June 29, 2010 7:56 pm
There is an increasing interest in the new generation in the roots of American jazz: Charleston, Swing, Lindy, hot jazz combos and dance bands before the Second World War. It's the "Third Wave" of the ukulele craze, and UVA, like other large universities in the East, have swing dance clubs, uke clubs and hold dance events/contests/lessons. The UVA Music School, the UVA Swing Club, and music education classes could partner with DJs over a fundraiser or a dance/studio event, maybe even all hosted by the well-educated and informative DJs who already do shows like Swingin' Saturday Night and Rhythm and Romance or Walking Blues. There are a few bands in town that have and will lend their support to any fundraiser/in studio performance/live broadcast of a USO-type dance, etc., should someone choose to focus on this type of American music, that you cannot always hear on any other station. Such an event would also draw an older crowd that is also drawn to this music--potential new listeners/donors.

Joyce Dudek | June 29, 2010 7:56 pm
Courses for credit. Faculty should be more involved with this wonderful resource.

Elizabeth Brickhouse | June 29, 2010 4:48 pm
I've just read through the suggestions already made - can't add to them!

Jennifer | June 29, 2010 3:59 pm
Make the training program for the station a part of the university curriculum, so that every new member of the station must take a specific radio training class. Sponsor campus events and collaborate with on-campus groups to provide mobile DJs. Be a presence on campus by broadcasting the station in dining halls, in student centers, etc.

Marla Muntner | June 29, 2010 3:07 pm
providing UVA news and other info relevant to that audience, engaging w/ listeners via social media

David Soyka | June 29, 2010 1:57 pm
Publicize in university publications that the station exists. Have WTJU booths at school events, maybe do a remote broadcast or two. Coordinate with music departments. Rotate WUVA student staff to promote WTJU though underwriting and marathon appeals. Perhaps a "talk show" or regular news program dedicated to university issues.

Jim Mandell | June 29, 2010 1:31 pm
There certainly already exists a wonderful and strong tradition of graduate student participation in WTJU. I learned far more from former grad student/DJ Rob Sheffield about the great unknowns of rock (to me at the time) than from other ostensibly cool stations I had listened to in Ithaca and New York City. Thanks to grad students like Rob and many others, I discovered Big Star, Pavement, Elliot Smith, Of Montreal and many more obscure. Although I agree with others that increasing student participation in other genres through course affiliations might work, it is only those who are passionate about their musical tastes who make great DJs. There is no reason that undergraduates with a musical passion should not be able to find a way to get involved in WTJU programming.

Mark Hineline | June 29, 2010 1:15 pm
Many good ideas here; increasing student involvement has to start with increased awareness, as has been mentioned: coordinate with the music department and feature student composers and performers from all styles of music. Perhaps expand into some spoken-word programming along the lines of This American Life or The Moth, both very popular and high quality radio programs and podcasts. Work with various schools at UVA to allow broadcasts of student audio-journalism projects, research projects and the like.

Joey Conover | June 29, 2010 12:23 pm
Get McIntire students to do a revenue generating project on it Have some fundraising through Battle of the Bands - have WTJU sponsor it, competitions on the radio? Student themed/hosted marathons

Adam | June 29, 2010 11:46 am
Students should get involved in the production/engineering side of things. There is far more to be gained by learning how to make someone sound good, than there is just to play tunes on the radio. Rick Rubin, great producer, decent artist. T-Bone Burnett, unbelievable producer, adequate musician. Didddy, talented producer, you got to be kidding me musician. A great producer can make the worst artist sound good. The same can be said of a radio producer. Other ideas already mentioned by others include advertising and promotion on behalf of the station, or for a particular program you believe deserves more attention from the university/community.

wynne Stuart | June 29, 2010 11:16 am
With regard to Marcia Day Childress' comment, connect with Media Studies faculty to work on something that develops the academic and the experiential in a course.

Greg Raymond | June 29, 2010 11:10 am
Create an open time slot for any student to broadcast what they want to play.

Max Friedfeld | June 29, 2010 9:15 am
I feel like the station is not well known on-grounds among the students. A better job at promotion needs to be done so students become aware of it. Also, the station should also cater to the students needs--maybe more popular music, or more local musicians in the charlottesville area.

Nicole Radshaw | June 29, 2010 8:28 am
Like other commenters, I think you could promote the station through the music and communcations departments with students receiving credit or internships.

Tes Slominski | June 29, 2010 12:33 am
Approach the music department about possibilities for airing the work of student composers and performers. WTJU could also be a forum for brief segments about composers/genres/performers written and read by musicology and ethnomusicology graduate students and advanced undergrads. Present it as something students can put on their cvs--it would help student involvement, and would offer an option for those students who have the goods but not the time to volunteer for hours at a time. Reach out to music professors to see if any are interested in incorporating WTJU into their lesson plans. It seems that student involvement has always been a LOT greater in the rock department, and while that makes sense, that doesn't mean that students wouldn't be interested in participating other departments. UVA has a fabulous music department--make the most of it!

Michelle Vermillion | June 28, 2010 10:46 pm
If it has not already been done, poll students on what they would like from their University station. Their wishes should then be considered in balance with what the interested members of the community would like from WTJU, since it is a Community station, serving members within as well as outside of the University.

Xiaolan Fang | June 28, 2010 10:44 pm
involve in more student activities (advertising, broadcasting, etc)

Kristin Szakos | June 28, 2010 10:00 pm
Talk show hosted by students about community issues. Apprenticeships with older dj's. Guest dj's who don't have to commit to every week.

Pam Roland | June 28, 2010 9:45 pm
Perhaps advertising it more among the student body? Perhaps mentoring new/wanna-be DJ's? Perhaps offering a mini-course on the role of radio in reaching 'the world'? Perhaps interviewing (and have spots on the radio) where you give mini-profiles of the voluneteers? Just a suggestion...

Robyn Kells | June 28, 2010 7:32 pm
Volunteering at WTJU isn't just fulfilling and fun...it's resume-building. Whether writing news articles/PSAs, doing market research, starting a WTJU support campaign among fellow students, helping engineer live shows, helping vet new releases received at the station, or filling an announcer's seat, WTJU offers a wealth of experiences that future employers would find valuable.

Emma Whittington | June 28, 2010 7:26 pm
Internships of all varieties,for those who want to learn about sound engineering to those interested in marketing — BUT with a priority for those students whose interests ALIGN with WTJU — not just any Marketing major at UVa

Clinton Hensley | June 28, 2010 4:26 pm
I couldn't agree more with Vic Szabo's comment (28 June, 11:39 a.m.). I believe if WTJU would make a conscientious effort to attract more students to learn the craft of Radio (with some of the veteran, volunteer DJs selflessly mentoring those prospective DJs), it could be the next great period for the station. It may seem a bit simplistic, but when I was at UVA, flyers did a lot to spread the word. Plaster them all over campus as a call to action for the students to take back their station. WTJU was never designed to be predictable, nor, was it supposed to be complacent. I wish the station good luck.

Blair Amberly | June 28, 2010 4:05 pm
Keep rock programming during the day and have more WTJU sponsored/affiliated shows both on and off campus (a great way to both promote the station to students but also turn students on to some of the incredible music being played on WTJU)

Starrie Williamson | June 28, 2010 4:00 pm
Play music from students in the Music department's Composition and Computer Technologies program.

Bill Maisannes | June 28, 2010 1:21 pm
Ask Music Professors to assign listening to WTJU and performing on WTJU as part of their curriculum.

Aaron Bailey | June 28, 2010 12:25 pm
Inspire involvement by playing more local music, recording/airing more local musicians, and making a more defined presence on campus and in town.

Vic Szabo | June 28, 2010 11:39 am
To start, students have to be aware that WTJU exists. Last semester, I asked my music class of 45 if anyone knew about the radio station. Not a single student was aware that UVa had one. Programming doesn't have to be watered down to attract students listeners, but students should be aware that they can hear interesting music they don't know about through WTJU. Word of mouth is the best marketing we have, but as it stands, WTJU isn't exactly hip to what students like. Students will be attracted to WTJU if they are given the ability to DJ and listen to music that they are interested in. As an instructor in music at UVa, I can say with fair certainty that the majority of students are interested in music that fall under the "rock" category - which of course, at WTJU, encompasses a lot more than guitar rock. One way to bring in more student DJ's might be to add rock hours between 3-6 AM. Rock hours and specialty shows could also be expanded to earlier in the evening.

Zanne Macdonald | June 28, 2010 11:31 am
I like the idea. I also like the idea that this station is unusual and a community station - not just a UVA station.

anne metz | June 28, 2010 11:15 am
Better marketing campaigns, and perhaps setting up tables at the beginning of the year activity festivals. Perhaps starting a radio internship program?

Marcia Day Childress | June 27, 2010 8:27 pm
The station should become an experiential learning/service site. Offer a one-credit course each semester that focuses on radio/media communications and their role in a pluralistic democracy; students in the course course could work at the station, including getting mike time and behind-the-scenes experience, so that they'd learn something about the practical business of running a largely volunteer-staffed community service media operation. Another possibility would be to partner WTJU with another station at another university--perhaps one abroad in a developing nation?--and let students have a role in helping to sustain the partner station. Also, offer internships to students--there's a wealth of practical knowledge to be gained through participation in station management.

Thomas Pease | June 27, 2010 6:10 pm
Draw on the talents of the graduate student population.

Sandy Snyder | June 27, 2010 5:40 pm
Start with making sure they know the station exists! If they just listen, they will learn a lot about music, i.e. listening to WTJU IS an "educational experience"

Anne Becker | June 27, 2010 3:39 pm
A breakdown of costs might be a good place to start, i.e. what that particular percentage of a student's fee is paying for at the radio station. I've never found any reason to suspect that the station doesn't budget & spend very carefully, so a little openness about the dollars shouldn't be painful.

Jay hertel | June 27, 2010 1:59 pm
WTJU needs to find the students rather than waiting for students to find it. The station needs to have a presence at student activity fairs, within relevant departments, in buildings where students congregate, and probably more important than anything else, online (can we get a direct link off of the UVA homepage?). The opportunities for meaningful internships need to be well-planned and promoted. Educating faculty about the internship opportunities will be very important (perhaps a faculty liason could be established).

Zoe | June 27, 2010 2:23 pm
First, inform them of WTJU's existence. I knew of TJU as a townie teenager back in the 80's. As a recent graduate of the Architecture School (Dec. '08), i've had countless conversations with other students and faculty who didn't know about this station. It seems there was a time when there were many more student DJ's than there are now, and very good ones too. Writing PSA's, devising marketing strategies, administration, graphic design could all be done by students. As pointed out by others, training should be provided. Students line up outside Madison House every year to snag volunteer opportunities: go out and get them!

Elizabeth Stark | June 27, 2010 11:46 am
-Sponsoring shows geared to students on grounds -Student interns at the station. This could be administrative or on-air. Perhaps the process for becoming a DJ could be more rigorous. Potential DJs could shadow current DJs for longer. This would increase interaction and knowledge for future DJs. UVa has an internship for school credit program, and all station volunteers who are students should receive credit. This would add a lot of value to all of the volunteer hours put in. Students have very busy schedules and being involved at the station is difficult to swing. Maybe a nominal salary for music directors? -Panel or lecture series sponsored by the station -Increased partnership with the Music Department

Mark Quigg | June 26, 2010 7:19 pm
Although students are important, I most appreciate the deep expertise of the volunteer DJs. Perhaps using the station as a center for student reporters, copywriters, and annoucers integrated with appropriate academic classes (journalism, modern history, musical history...)

Khristina VanHall | June 26, 2010 6:58 pm
Definately get help from those students with marketing, business, and communications degrees.

Anthony Gallo | June 25, 2010 10:31 am
Give more/better hours to the genre(s) that students are most interested in! Put rock programming during the day, or at least late afternoon/evening hours as opposed to late nights only!

Geof Carter | June 25, 2010 6:59 am
Live DJ events on Friday & Saturday

Kirsten Miles | June 25, 2010 6:51 am
Absolutely. The fact that student fees support the station, combined with the innovation that is generated by student involvement in countless arenas at UVa should be a clear indicator that greater student involvement could benefit the station on multiple levels. Not only will greater student involvement likely increase listenership, but the potential for entrepreneurial ideas that could enhance the station and student experience is high.

Jordan Taylor | June 25, 2010 2:39 am
The idea of getting students involved via the public affairs segments is a good idea although UVa is noticeable short in any kind of broadcast journalism or straight journalism course offerings. I still think that many of the administrative tasks that are performed by paid staff were done by students at my previous college radio stations. That said, I think all departments need a significant student push. I did jazz radio as a 19-year old and I think it really means taking a concerted effort to visit classes and individually bring around students. I have several of my high school students involved and they are involved because I suggest it to them. I hold their hand a little and give them lots of encouragement. People want to be wanted, but they have to feel that and it takes effort from DJs and people involved with station. As a former TA and teacher of Media Studies students, these students are not ideally equipped to help but they certainly would/should understand the public airwaves as a public trust and the vital role of noncommercial radio as an educational force in the community. Finally, students either need a vastly improved website and/or a radio. If they don't have a clock radio, most students don't even own a radio. There are lots of nicely designed cheap radios that could be handed out as enticements at activity fairs or other events. Why are we not part of every UPC event? When Lady Gaga comes to town, why don't students see our banner?

Andrew Pratt | June 24, 2010 10:32 pm
There are many jobs that would benefit from a robust student participation, not least of which the preparation for fund drives and promotion of the station through regular commentary in the weekly student newspapers or blogs (e.g., talking up shows of special interest, relating when live events are scheduled in the studio, getting out the word online and in print). Pairing interested students with willing (and able) established DJs in all four departments would allow the students to learn about the art and the craft of presenting a successful show, not to mention foster their love and understanding of music. After an intern period they might have the opportunity to put this education to work by becoming subs and then announcers themselves. I do believe that WTJU is as much *community* radio as college radio, and the incredible richness of knowledge of announcers from the community should not be sacrificed to the altar of increased student participation, but rather used to enrich the student's UVA experience by fostering knowledge, curiosity and imagination (not to mention teaching some very practical skills related to announcing and using studio equipment).

Stuart Gilchrist | June 24, 2010 6:23 pm
Promote Broadcasting as a career choice. Make being a dj, getting licensed (broadcast engineer) part of the required curriculum for certain related course of study, journalism, music, entertainment law, theater, etc.

steve vargo | June 24, 2010 6:01 pm
is college credit given to station interns?

Jessie Abbate | June 24, 2010 5:45 pm
have slots open throughout the week or month that can be a revolving door for special programs - much like during the fund drives - and let students put together the show and pair up with experienced volunteers for it, so that it's not so intimidating. then more of their friends will listen, etc. Maybe even having students design and sell the T-shirts (or water bottles, mugs, etc) on campus like other organizations do...

David Lee | June 24, 2010 4:51 pm
Reach out to Commerce School for marketing internships, for special PR projects and regular fund raising.

U.Va. employee and music fan | June 24, 2010 4:38 pm
I think rock hours should be more accessible. Most do not tune in after 11 p.m. However, I think we have great volunteer DJs and they should not be taken for granted or locked out of the process. My half-brother attended U.Va. in the early 1980s where he heard all sorts of punk and college rock. This went on to influence me. I owe the edgy WTJU DJs of that time period. WTJU does not need to start playing Dave Matthews to appeal to students. It's an education to learn new and different music. But please increase the rock for their sake and my sake.

Zachary Wheat | June 24, 2010 4:35 pm
I feel a concerted, thoughtful effort should be made to invite student participation in the running of the station, and to increase their awareness of TJU as a great place to hear music. Our student body at UVa is one of the best and brightest in the nation, and we should be tapping into that wealth of talent, knowledge and enthusiasm as much as we can.

How can WTJU do a better job of reaching potential student interns/volunteers?

Nick | July 23, 2010 5:36 pm
good ways to reach potential student interns are to use the regular graduate and undergrad email blasts from the respective student councils; partner with other student groups on appropriate projects; and contact professors teaching classes with likely crossover to the projects mentioned above. it would also be great if the station could convince the UTS busdrivers to play the station during rock shows.

Christopher Javor | July 23, 2010 2:54 pm
Make it known.

Katie Vogel | July 23, 2010 1:19 pm
A lot of students don't have radios or access to radios, so of course, the live stream helps. I go to NYU in Manhattan (I'm from Charlottesville) and I listen live all the time. So, promoting the live stream, but also a podcast of certain shows would be a good idea (so you can put the podcast on your ipod.) I know a lot of people who don't listen to the radio or streams, but who subscribe religiously to podcasts.

George | July 21, 2010 2:11 pm
Again, the music. The current announcers only play there favorites,that is to limited.

Brian Keena | July 20, 2010 10:52 pm
OFfer a credit course for internship. OFfer a community service credit for students to volunteer at the station. Include info about WTJU at student orientation and in all UVA catalogs. Offer regular, scheduled tours of the station. In fact, include it as part of the prospective-student tour route.

James Shelton | July 19, 2010 11:30 pm
Complete control of the airwaves by volunteers, no private finical interrest should control the format or even be involved.

Bill Sublette | July 19, 2010 6:54 pm
See above.

M Jameson-Lee | July 18, 2010 3:36 pm
Advertising on UVA's homepage, in print, etc.

Tim Ballo | July 17, 2010 9:00 pm
Honestly, I can't blame students for being indifferent to radio, as most have never been exposed to a station with challenging programming. Reaching out to the University's music department would seem to be one possibility, but there are also opportunities to learn production techniques for students who may not be interested in music.

Nancy Deutsch | July 16, 2010 3:57 pm
see above re: connecting with departments and student orgs

Kristofer Monson | July 16, 2010 10:17 am
create facebook events and groups

David Cosper | July 16, 2010 12:39 am
Again, I think it's about publicity. For students, I'd think the work sells itself; the problem is that many students are simply unaware of opportunities to be involved.

Peter Tschirhart | July 15, 2010 10:28 pm
No really good suggestions here. Although this is one area that linking the station with an undergraduate class or seminar might be helpful--because you could more or less make volunteering a requirement.

Michael Heny | July 15, 2010 9:23 pm
Get the word out through linking to University department homepages.

Thatcher Stone | July 15, 2010 9:09 am
ask them what they are looking for; don't dictate

eve schwartz | July 15, 2010 8:54 am
Make it easy for them to listen. Begin a listserve which will notify participants of special programming (such as the Jazz Dept's salute to New Orleans, held during the anniversary of the Katrina disaster). Send out a notice several days before broadcast and AS BROADCAST BEGINS so they can click on the link and tune in while studying. Reach out to students registered in all music courses, both performance and "book" courses, as well as those involved in student run a capella groups, as these are already interested in what you do: music. Once students begin listening in larger numbers and become excited about the music, they will become interested in becoming involved with the station (especially if their involvement can serve as their community service requirement).

Marybeth Collins | July 15, 2010 12:15 am
4) Re: "A New Plan For Volunteerism at WTJU: July 12, 2010" Students are just that, students. The deejays at WTJU have an enormous wealth of knowledge and depth of experience that could provide highly enriching learning experiences for students. The deejays are a treasure trove of musical knowledge. They are walking, talking libraries of personal experience that students can learn from. Rather than looking at it in a paradigm in which students can't get in, an "either/or" as it were, use both. Structure some kind of mentorship program in which students are assigned to current volunteer DJ's wherein students learn through active participation and real life experience.

Valerie L'Herrou | July 14, 2010 7:25 pm
see above... and: --Um, why no link to WTJU on virginia.edu homepage? --Since WTJU was moved away from the main grounds, it's less visible. There needs to be visible reminders of the station in Newcomb Hall, dining halls, bulletin boards (real and virtual). --reach out to professors. They should be recommending their students participate in TJU if there's any tangential relationship (ie, music, engineering, media studies, etc)

Bill Tetzeli | July 14, 2010 1:30 pm
Whenever a slot opens up for a new DJ, preference should be given to students. This will encourage new blood to come into the station while preserving institutional memory, seeing how long most DJ's stick around and how often UVA grads end up staying in Charlottesville anyway.

Tom Tartaglino | July 14, 2010 8:13 am
I don't know. Everyone I know is so busy. I would volunteer if I had a minute. I might consider being a volunteer for a special function like a fund raiser or such.

MW | July 13, 2010 10:49 pm
How many students are currently WTJU volunteers? Have we asked their opinions? I know its summer but we should have their e-mail addresses. Reach out to Pat Lampkin, the Vice President for Student Affairs. Ask her the best avenues to reach students. Another internship opportunity is writing and executing a marketing plan designed to reach UVa students.

Ginny Chilton | July 13, 2010 8:39 pm
Many students do not even have a radio anymore. Everything they listen to is streaming through the web, or downloadable onto an mp3 player. Luckily TJU streams online, but TJU programs can also be saved and made available to download for free, on demand. This also solves a common complaint about TJU: "I want to listen to TJU, but it's so eclectic, every time I tune in it's some genre I don't like." Listeners can go to the station website, find their favorite program, and download it. Actively seek out student music events of all genres, and interview the student leaders of those groups on-air. Create a program based around their upcoming event. Members and friends of these student groups will tune in to hear their pals. Even though many don't own a radio, it's still very exciting to be LIVE on the air!! The internet is the best way to advertise to students. Facebook is an easy way to reach a large audience, and to target UVa students specifically.

Lesley Myers | July 13, 2010 3:46 pm
Arrange for them to get academic credit for volunteering at the station.

C. Garges | July 13, 2010 10:10 am
Through the music program

Roger Clarke | July 13, 2010 4:15 am
Task the Office of Public Affairs with marketing WTJU's volunteer/internship opportunities via the web and traditional media, such as flyers/handbills and student publications, and .

Don Harrison | July 12, 2010 11:58 pm
I love the ideas expressed on this forum, things like the "Become a DJ" Fall concert and the roving Community DJ unit. But let's start with a series of public service announcements on WTJU and an eye-catching ad campaign in the student paper. Something modest but effective that could be done immediately.

Werner K. Sensbach | July 12, 2010 11:42 pm
Use Madison House to actively recruit volunteers for the station

Linn Harrison | July 12, 2010 6:00 pm
Can't comment on this as not familiar with the avenues available or already tried.

Khalil Hassan | July 12, 2010 4:24 pm
Go to them rather waiting for them to come to you. Live broadcasts from student events.

Toni Barskile | July 12, 2010 3:59 pm
See above. Emphasize the freedom, creativity, and diversity that can be found @ WTJU. Play up the marketable skills that students can develop while working at the station.

Beth Burnam | July 12, 2010 3:25 pm
clearly, by using social networking sites. (Or that's what I'm told; since I'd rather listen to the radio.) Students are always interested in building resumes; use that interest for the radio station's benefit.

Rob Sheffield | July 12, 2010 3:05 pm
The station's web presence is minimal at the moment, which makes WTJU less accessible to students. As many have suggested in this forum, course credit for student internships at WTJU.

Sharon Defibaugh | July 12, 2010 2:37 pm
Posters up on all the UVA bulletin boards

Keith Alnwick | July 12, 2010 2:31 pm
Increased tie-ins with music, arts, business and communications curricula. More ability to get self-authored content on the air.

Bryan Wright | July 12, 2010 2:23 pm
Through demonstrating the station's integrity, and dedication to the idea that all music and, by extension, all cultures are worthy of respect. This isn't something that can be done quickly.

Michael Holroyd | July 12, 2010 1:48 pm
The impression I get currently is that most people find WTJU on their own because they want to do a radio show. There are lots of people who would be willing to help behind the scenes, but don't know that WTJU is interested in student help. Just simple flyers would go a long way toward attracting more people.

Peter Hedlund | July 12, 2010 12:22 pm
Advertise in C'ville/Hook/Cav. Daily

Lynn Hedlund | July 12, 2010 12:02 pm
I have never received an e-mail with WTJU opportunities so maybe try using a UVa listserve every so often.

Dennis DaLuiso | July 12, 2010 11:51 am
Open up more airtime by shortening long daily sessions of jazz. Allow local venues to broadcast live as the Prism did years ago.

Carol chandross | July 12, 2010 11:17 am
Offering credits to music students and language students

kate nesbitt | July 12, 2010 10:39 am
promote career potential. Many friends and roommates who worked at the station as djs, program or news directors, etc. went on to careers in radio.

Michael Ludgate | July 12, 2010 10:14 am
Offer them a real learning experience

Carla Arton | July 12, 2010 7:41 am
Advertise it more on your station.

Susanna Spencer | July 11, 2010 11:42 pm
Don't know much about this aspect, but certainly believe retaining opportunity to create original programming would be the most attractive aspect.

J May | July 11, 2010 9:46 pm
Post volunteer opportunity flyers throughout the UVA grounds.

Peter Henderson | July 11, 2010 6:58 pm
Maybe the station is reaching them but they just have other demands on their time. As I mentioned in my previous answer, students do not have as much free time in today's competitive environment as they have had in the past. UVA is not a training ground for future broadcast professionals and in my opinion it should not be a priority to become one. The more important purpose of WTJU is to expose listeners to a variety of culturally significant music. However, more spots for announcers could be freed up in the late night hours. In the past, announcers in these slots have been allowed more freedom to do off-beat and edgy programming, to be creative and irreverent and in general to express themselves, so students might be especially attracted to these spots. A college radio station should not be too straight-laced. There will be plenty of time for regimentation and soulless conformity later.

Henry Wiencek | July 11, 2010 5:48 pm
Post announcements for "open mike" hours.

Liz Chaldekas | July 11, 2010 3:57 pm
Send an email to all students, especially new students. The students I talked to did not even know about the station. Get a mention on a website that students go to.

Phyllis Binder | July 11, 2010 12:49 pm
Many good ideas have been offered in previous responses to this question.

Steve Guion | July 11, 2010 9:56 am
Promotion. Give them a reason to want to listen to the station. Be different. Distinguish yourself from your competition.

Pamela Blevins | July 11, 2010 8:46 am
Open the world of classical music to them in new ways. Take the dust off composers the way Cinder Stanton does and make them come alive so that young people will want to engage and learn more.

Vern Buchanan | July 11, 2010 7:59 am
actively recruit them .

Lori Derr | July 10, 2010 8:03 pm
1)Offer broadcasting classes at the studio. 2) Poll the students for the times that they would be most likely to listen to WTJU 3) poll the students to see the music they want to hear for the most popular listening time. 4) keep the excellent jazz and classical and world music programming to continue the educational mission of WTJU. I have learned so much from the jazz and world music DJ's I cannot even put a value on it. The amazing research they do put on their shows has had deep and abiding influences on me as a listener and and a jazz singer in our community and elsewhere

Aaron Zatcoff | July 10, 2010 4:20 pm
Again market towards that audience, but not by reflecting popular tastes... that leads to mediocrity and that is already rampant on the radio landscape. We offer interesting, unusual and adventurous art music as opposed to commercial or the musical equivalent of burgers and fries. Ours is a kind of haute cuisine, musically speaking.

kevin burns | July 10, 2010 3:42 pm
Vastly increasing the station's advertising and promotion efforts, both self promotion on 91.1 and also on the internet, social networking sites and links to any UVA websites is essential to raising the station's listernship and student involvement. Promotion aimed at recruiting students should stress both the fun and the possible rewards of bringing whatever music they love to the university, local and internet audiences. A big part of this appeal should be the total freedom of the dj to create their own playlist.

Prue Thorner | July 10, 2010 2:17 pm
Credit for time spent working at the station would be one way to increase participation. Asking the best students to read aloud from their essays, research papers on topics of broad interest: history, science, languages, linguistics, environmental research. This would be a great experience for students and interesting for listeners.

Tim Beeghly | July 10, 2010 1:31 pm
Better marketing of WTJU both on grounds through student fairs, UVA website, T-shirt giveaways at athletic events as well as outside UVA through print ads and more structured radio promos at other stations.

Ruth Cross | July 10, 2010 10:48 am
Tie in selections played on WTJU to material dealt with in some of the courses offered by the Music Dpt.

staiger white | July 10, 2010 10:27 am
I feel quite strongly that students who are interested in music certainly already know about WTJU. WTJU should be open to their participation as volunteers should they present themselves to you. But can't we expect ourselves to have the energy and initiative to seek opportunities? It should not just be the responsibility of the station to solicit students to participate.

Dan Goldberg | July 10, 2010 10:18 am
I am not sure volunteer information is well publicized. I have considered trying to get involved a number of times. I backed off because I did not have a good idea whether I had a skill that would help, and if I did, I was not sure how much time it would demand. As a busy parent and farmer with a full time job my free time is very limited (This not so unusual I know).

Jace Goodling | July 10, 2010 7:55 am
offer class credits for participation, co-op with PVCC

Mark Greenfield | July 9, 2010 8:11 pm
Put the word out that if we what WTJU to remain the unique and wonderful station that it is, we all need to pitch in and help.

Clarice Schermerhorn | July 9, 2010 5:13 pm
Make it easy for them to know what jobs there are, and what sort of scheduling you have in mind, and make it easy for them to get in touch with you. This would also work for community volunteers.

Will Harvey | July 9, 2010 4:22 pm
Highlighting the educational value being imparted to the community would help, maybe giving some type of credit for their work would also make it attractive.

David J. Simpson | July 8, 2010 5:41 pm
As has already been suggested, the station should make itself better known to students.

Matt Ulibarri | July 8, 2010 5:00 pm
Guerilla marketing. I don't expect glossy fliers, I'm thinking cheap little pieces of paper.

Mary Ann | July 8, 2010 3:28 pm
- Set up a booth at a strategic location at the beginning of each semester to introduce/reintroduce the Station, present its Vision and business plan for moving forward, and listing the kinds of help needed, as well as soliciting ideas. - Send out a flyer with that same info in registration packages, post in Dorms, etc.

Ron Povich | July 8, 2010 2:19 pm
In additional to the above outreach efforts, WTJU could be more present in sponsoring music at the University, hosting events, etc.

Karen O'Brien | July 8, 2010 2:12 pm
Open up some section of programming time that is for students to decide on format and content. A news talk show by and for students? A call-in thing? Music that is more of their generation than currently represented? Maybe party nights music on Fri and Sat? Get them involved in more journalism and using the WTJU platform for this. Also - the website. It is pretty hokey. Get some of them involved in redesigning it, and use it as more of a social networking thing. But the students will need to "own" the station for it to be active.

Marietta McCarty | July 8, 2010 11:49 am
Same: faculty and student majors in music. But WTJU is known for its eclectic educational format, and other departments should be involved as well: history and jazz, philosophy and religious studies and classical, etc. In my most recent book I use music, jazz especially, as a way of thinking about philosophical topics such as simplicity (Monk), flexibility (Parker) and individuality (Billie Holiday). I gathered a great deal of information from your morning jazz shows, the jazz messenger and left of cool, for example.

Jeff Carlin | July 8, 2010 8:44 am
Well, marketing in general is lacking. There's no reason WTJU shouldn't have a presence (a table, handing out flyers/stickers/fridge magnets, etc.) at almost all student events. And WTJU can sponsor live music events on campus. And more web presence via facebook, twitter, and the WTJU web site. Basically, highlight the eclectic, innovative institution that is WTJU -- this starts by simply making people aware it exists!

Colin Campbell | July 7, 2010 10:14 pm
Better presence and recruitment throughout campus. Regular programming, particularly in evening/late night hours, that students would be likely to listen to.

Valerie Matthews | July 7, 2010 8:12 pm
Student publications? Faculty participation and encouragement.

William Shoup | July 7, 2010 6:32 pm
Keep the old, bring on the new,keep the station vibrant.

Bev Ogilvie | July 7, 2010 5:16 pm
Attract students in the fields of communication, business and the humanities, as well as those in music and the arts. Enjoyment of the classics provides life-long enrichment, what ever one's career may be.

ned oldham | July 7, 2010 5:09 pm
Offer more interesting and, yes, "cool" opportunities. Develop a cool-looking email to send to all incoming and returning students at the start of each year that visually and textually draws them in by showing the connection between digital editing, ipod and youtube playlists, the fact that cool is not always mainstream; offer production classes for credit that utilize laptop software to produce cool and coherent hour-long radio-shows.

Josh Krahn | July 7, 2010 4:36 pm
First, make it easier for students to listen. Radios are no longer ubiquitous. Increase web presence. Revamp the website and make it easier to stream on more devices.

Margaret Lee | July 7, 2010 3:22 pm
Ask us.

Peter Welch | July 7, 2010 3:17 pm
You can start by letting students know the station exists. This doesn't require a format change, it simply requires more attention to promotion and collaboration with university departments.

Ryan Mann | July 7, 2010 3:05 pm
Open Houses/ Hands-on opportunities

Cindy Benton-Groner | July 7, 2010 1:49 pm
Get the word out about the uniqueness of WTJU's programming using the enthusiasm of current students already involved. Contact relevant student groups to elicit their ideas. Encourage them to come into the studio to make PSA's for their clubs. Encourage faculty and students to interview UVA guest speakers on the air.

Bob Girard | July 7, 2010 12:52 pm
Have dorm/area oriented meetings and invite comment. Scheduling this "change" for the middle of the Summer smacks of a plan that won't involve students in any case.

Erika Herz | July 7, 2010 12:20 pm
Work with Madison House somehow because so many students come thru there. Have students compete to write and deliver PSAs on their favorite volunteer project, which will give them an exposure to the station.

Bridge Cox | July 7, 2010 11:10 am
Simply making itself more available and known to the students. It is fairly invisible, and always has been. BUT generational changes have made doing a radio show or helping with radio marginally "cool." This means that whereas when I and many other current DJs came to school and sought out the radio station we were interested to do whatever we had to become involved, whereas todays youth can just simply download radio shows or podcasts, etc. off the internet and and don't have to deal with the radio.

Mitchell Oliver ('13) | July 7, 2010 9:21 am
How about.. A PRESENCE? Come on, we are an official radio station for UVa, and we don't even have a link on the UVa homepage, McIntire's music page, anything! We seriously are as far removed from the actual University as possible. I got involved with TJU as soon as I decided to come to UVa, I waded through the awful application process the summer before my first year. It took one glance at the rock playlists to make me apply, I guess I'm crazy, maybe I just really love college radio, and maybe I thought TJU seemed like something far more than your average college radio station. down to it: --Student Activities Fair. --Network with Class Councils, UPC, PKG, Cav Daily, the Dec, McIntire Music, McIntire Art, Media Studies department, the list of groups that have huge potential for opportunities with TJU goes on and on --STUDENT ACTIVITIES FAIR (I'd say roughly 50% of what students are involved with now, they got into at the activities fair) --DJ student/community functions (art exhibits, formals, dances, dinners, etc) --Have a clear path for student volunteers (the application is awful) --Closer knit community of volunteers and DJs (fostered through station events, DJ apprenticeship, etc) --wide variety of volunteer roles --promise of student DJing (reserve a couple shows for student with seniority) --WTJU presence on and off grounds (remote broadcast on the lawn, more legitimate efforts for T-shirts and schwag at local/university music/art events, just a hint of endorsement and some plugs by the University would be REALLY NICE for a quick example of how powerful TJU can be, imagine the Rock Marathon in the spring, which has been advertised for weeks in advance with twitter, facebook events, emails to the "fans of TJU" list-serve, and normal student hype, with several student DJs working together on a show that is being broadcasted remotely on the lawn at a booth/table with programming schedules and fliers of upcoming events, t-shirts, stickers and cups galore (for free! students eat that stuff up), and dozens of interested of students learning about getting involved or just hanging out and enjoying the music. It's entirely possible. And it's even more possible if the core values of the station are left as they are now. --

Peter Brunjes | July 7, 2010 8:49 am
Show up in the dorms more? Figure out a way that students can receive resume-building recognition from work at the station.

Gary Canino | July 7, 2010 12:34 am
The simple answer that my fellow student DJs would back is to NOT LIMIT ROCK SHOWS TO ONLY NIGHT TIME! The majority of students at WTJU participate in the rock department. When the "New WTJU" Rock Department is forced to dole out shows from 10pm-3am, how could a student new to the station possibly see that as something they'd want to do with an 8am class looming? My show last year was at 12pm, which worked great for me, but now that I HAVE to do a late night show (say from 1-3am), will I have to show up to my morning classes half asleep with bags under my eyes? Will the students with an interest in doing a rock show that are new to the station (i.e. the majority of them) ask the same question upon considering being a part of WTJU? Ask any of the student DJs with weekday 1-3am shows now and see how much they like it. The "New WTJU" is planning on involving more students by alienating the incoming students (taking the department they're MOST LIKELY to get involved in and shoving it away to inaccessibly late at night). Counter-intuitive to the core.

Rusty Trainham | July 7, 2010 12:26 am
At the beginning of each semester WTJU should advertise open house, and should actively encourage students to drop by. Admittedly, this was easier in the days when the studios were located on Central Grounds.

Becky Calvert | July 6, 2010 6:53 pm
Marketing, plain and simple.

Content Sablinsky | July 6, 2010 6:22 pm
Although I taught piano in the Music Department for 27 years, I never once saw anything about the need for student interns/volunteers posted in the department, or anyone in person - for that matter - coming over to "pitch the cause."

Rick Kast | July 6, 2010 5:35 pm
More visible tie-ins with relevant educational programs would seem to make sense. Also perhaps more user friendly interfaces on the student portion of the University website.

Richard Guy Wilson | July 6, 2010 3:34 pm
do a better job of getting word out.

Emily Sloan | July 6, 2010 3:28 pm
More rock hours! This is a COLLEGE RADIO STATION so it should PLAY THE MUSIC THAT COLLEGE STUDENTS WOULD LISTEN TO

Alison Booth | July 6, 2010 3:09 pm
As a full-time academic faculty member, I urge educating the faculty to direct student interest toward audio media and radio per se. Media studies is a good program to begin with, but others in humanities and social sciences and even engineering would have an interest.

Michaux Hood | July 6, 2010 1:51 pm
I'm not sure :)

Michael D. Mabry (Law 1991) | July 6, 2010 1:24 pm
tudents with sophisticated musical interests will always find their way to WTJU. What concerns me is the unstated assumption that the Station’s “success” or “value” is appropriately measured by the degree of student participation – by no means a universal standard for “college” radio stations. In Philadelphia, where I live, Penn’s flagship radio station – WXPN – produces several syndicated programs that are heard on public radio stations nationwide; it has virtually no apparent student involvement. Temple University’s Classical/Jazz WRTI likewise has no detectable student involvement. Princeton’s WPRB has a format similar to WTJU, but student participation would seem to be concentrated in its Rock programming. Drexel’s WKDU has a much higher degree of student involvement, and an internet listenership that extends well beyond its limited broadcast range, but its programming range is rather narrow. Sadly, none of these stations hold a candle to WTJU for breadth oand depth of programming quality. WTJU is one of the best “college” radio stations in America, and that can only be attributable to its community based, all volunteer organizational structure and the gifted DJs that that structure has produced.

Davis Salisbury | July 6, 2010 1:08 pm
Well, I am sure that the University has a firm grasp on what students spend their time doing and what resources are successfully advertised and presented to students already. If so, present these successful programs to the WTJU staff and work on incorporating what is successful about them into the WTJU protocol. I do not believe that all of the onus should be on WTJU, as it is staffed by volunteers who are already committing a significant amount of free, unpaid labor to the station. Most of the DJs are happy to help, but certainly this effort to increase student participation should be focussed on where the students are: in class and the common areas the students access at the University. Why not more tie-ins to coursework in the music department, with scheduled performances on-air by student musicians and faculty members. Concerts promoted via the station AND the University involving student musicians. And, again, course/academic credits available for those who want to commit a significant amount of time to WTJU. It is not enough for WTJU to be "cool", the students need incentives to volunteer. I believe the proposed changes to programming are a mistake for one primary reason: as an educational tool, I think stressing the uniqueness of the programming and focussing on the station's role as a repository of historically significant music and history is to be treasured, not swept aside solely to gain listenership. There is no cultural value, in my opinion, to a programming focussed on narrowing the range of music played on the station. The only opportunity involved with this new type of programming is for a student interested in working at a quasi-commercial station, which is what WTJU would become, whether the agents of change want to admit it or not.

Brian Glover | July 6, 2010 10:45 am
Make sure you've always got a table with flyers, stickers, and a friendly staffer at all music venues (even house shows!) around town. Go out and meet the people who love music and will come out to support it, whether at Cabell or at the Twisted Branch.

kay slaughter | July 6, 2010 10:03 am
Have a volunteer table at the beginning of school year at both PVCC and UVa. Find out if WTJU info could be mailed to new PVCC/UVA students. Flyers Blitz at beginning of year -- hold a social open house for students with refreshments and tour.

John Dean | July 6, 2010 12:15 am
I was a DJ at WTJU when I was in graduate school. I was attracted to the station because I was a musician and I wanted to share the music I loved with the Charlottesville public. That is a typical scenario at WTJU, and I would suggest that it is a good model. Focus on the music, and look to build a community of music enthusiasts and experts as the core strength of the station. To put this another way -- build the community, and students who share this enthusiasm will come. Nowadays people can access any kind of music they want, any time they want. But people are hungry to find an actual community they can connect with.

Cal Glattfelder | July 5, 2010 9:12 pm
Tell the students that you want them involved as soon as they arrive this fall through the student union or some sort of university mailing. Once you get them through the door they can see the opportunities you offer.

Malcolm Bell | July 5, 2010 7:08 pm
The Dept. of Music and the Symphony could be enlisted to help make classical programming known to students, encouraging the involvement of people with particular musical interests, talents, and knowledge. Regular student volunteers and announcers would serve to advertise the possibility of involvement to the student community.

Sally Thomas | July 5, 2010 6:35 pm
Make sure the tasks are meaningful. Survey post-graduation-job recruiters what they would find impressive in a student's involvement with a radio station, and use the results of that survey to craft attractive "job" desciptions for students.

Harvey Liszt | July 5, 2010 5:55 pm
Give every student as much air time as they wish, with no constraints, to express themselves.

Phil Stokes | July 5, 2010 5:38 pm
Improve web presence and web signup tools. Pay student interns a stipend.

Ann Benner | July 5, 2010 5:32 pm
Continue to allow student innovation and creativity. Be sure students who participate are recognized for their contributions.

Susie McRae | July 5, 2010 4:17 pm
I don't know what the station is doing now to advertise to students. If it is the same thing that was going on when I was a student, then that means the station is doing nothing. Advertise to the students, let them know over and over again about the opportunities to intern or volunteer.

greg wichelns | July 5, 2010 4:16 pm
not sure.

Zack Perdue | July 5, 2010 3:58 pm
Advertise in student newspapers.

Tina Eshleman | July 5, 2010 12:00 pm
See my answer to the previous question. Also, professors who teach music courses could tie WTJU into their curriculum and encourage student projects that involve WTJU.

Bob Williamson | July 5, 2010 10:59 am
See if local clubs and businesses would honor coupons, vouchers, or vol worker ID's for a free beverage, cover charge, or whatever sor those working to help the cause (which helps those businesses).

Jenny Wyss | July 5, 2010 8:58 am
See above Fridays after Five WTJU advertising in alternative newsweeklies and Cav Daily Booth at City Market

matthew kavanaugh | July 5, 2010 7:00 am
Have all incoming first years tour the station. Play TJU in the dining halls. Put up banners at the sporting events.

Anna Askounis | July 5, 2010 6:33 am
See above.

Brigitte&Goetz Hardtmann | July 4, 2010 5:20 pm
You need to develop a strategy to focus on and address students who are already performing.

Charles Choi | July 4, 2010 2:30 pm
WTJU needs to put more much more effort into recruiting students via all channels of access to the student population. Conversely, WTJU needs to re-examine its internal process for staff retention and provide room for increased student participation.

Randy May | July 4, 2010 12:57 pm
It seems to me there are plenty of university functions where a simple banner or information table could be manned by volunteers (students) to pass out literature, sell hats, coffee cups and definitely bumper stickers. Such a booth or table should be a common sight at games, performances, any gatherings under the name of UVA...Since many of these functions are available to the public in general, they too would be able to walk up as well as the interested student. in lieu of this "fishing net" approach, mailings (traditional,email,social networking,etc.)directed at faculty, department heads, area music stores and other theater groups,etc. could prove just as effective in the search for volunteers.

Jay Kardan | July 4, 2010 9:58 am
Publicity, publicity, publicity. The station should advertise itself aggressively on Grounds.

Beth Hodsdon | July 4, 2010 9:42 am
The ideas I see already expressed seem excellent Also, involve McIntyre and Darden students in marketing/underwritng projects as part of courses

Marva Barnett | July 4, 2010 8:18 am
Become part of the Academic Community Engagement Program, so that students get some sort of academic credit for some of their work.

Mary Anna Dunn | July 4, 2010 8:18 am
I don't know what you do on campus, but I haven't noticed very much outreach on air. I find the best way to get students is to communicate directly with service organizations. Again, as I said above, make it fun and make it social.

Mark Buckner | July 3, 2010 9:38 pm
I say "Amen!" to William Kestler's suggestion about updating promos. Some of them were quite clever and cool--the first time. Lo! What's that sound? Makes me wanna take a sledge hammah to my rah-diddy-owe. I don't do that, but I do turn the radio off until the promo is over. Really.

Nancy Summers | July 3, 2010 3:46 pm
I actually don't know how the station deals with students. It is possible that the suggestions I made are already in place. Faculty need to know about potential uses of WTJU for students in their courses. I think the station need to reach out to faculty - perhaps make a presentation in faculty meetings about how students can creatively use the station.

Dave Rogers | July 3, 2010 12:43 pm
Public affairs programming, engineering, web outreach, surveying opportunities all done as service/independent credit. Promote these opportunities beyond the airwaves. Respond and train quickly when they volunteer.

Elizabeth Benzinger | July 3, 2010 10:52 am
I would hope potential interns or volunteers are involved in this Forum. I certainly hope their professors and mentors are involved. I think word of mouth is a powerful tool for spreading the word. The station does announce its presence in concert programs; in those ads we should mention some of the possibilities we offer students.

Elizabeth | July 3, 2010 9:28 am
Advertise using student channels (e.g., "Uva Connections," ads in student newspapers like The Declaration, use mailing lists for media or music departments. Put up fliers. Get sign-ups at activity fairs.)

Liz Courain | July 3, 2010 9:06 am
UVA has an excellent undergraduate internship program. WTJU could have internships listed in a variety of areas: marketing, administration, on-air assistant,etc. These students serve from 10-17 hours per week, depending on the time of year. They require staff supervision and a plan for their time, but they are smart, eager and bring a lot to the internship.

Erik | July 3, 2010 8:56 am
Market yourselves as more professional, providing a leg up in broadcasting. And realize that your audience includes much more than students only. I suspect that most students get their listening off their computers and iPods rather than from a local radio station.

Barclay Rives | July 3, 2010 8:36 am
Recruit. Advertise. Party.

Judith Thomas | July 2, 2010 11:31 pm
Engage the performance, composition and musicology faculty in recruiting students. This is an amazing jazz town, and John D'Earth and the other jazz faculty turn a lot of students onto jazz. Free Bridge Quintet and UVA Jazz Ensemble concerts are packed with students: lots of potential student volunteers in that audience.

Willian Kestler | July 2, 2010 10:22 pm
Update the old promos often to keep them fresh. Really, some of them are decades old which only makes WTJU seem like it's totally out of it. Like that one, "Do you like music.... (announcer falls asleep)...that makes you move?" Or that "Two whole HOURS of Celtic music" or whatever kind of music it's announcing; I just don't hear the message anymore, just thinking, "Oh, not again". I've heard them thousands of times. A few hundred should be the shelf life.

Deborah Murray | July 2, 2010 6:39 pm
Again, better connection with the Music Department, more presence at UVA-sponsored music events and other student events. It would seem to me that UVA would already have in place good systems to inform students about opportunties available to them.

Judith Shatin | July 2, 2010 4:11 pm
Regular ads on student bulletin boards. Host mini-conference on careers in radio. Send volunteers to fraternities and sororities to as well as residence halls to talk about WTJU and the opportunities.

Eric Wiland | July 2, 2010 3:32 pm
It needs to boast its accomplishments and unique qualities. The station needs to reflect on why they are proud of the station, and then display that enthusiasm.

Lisa Reeder | July 2, 2010 2:49 pm
Madison House; fraternity and sorority community service hours; mentorships between established DJs from the C'ville community and budding talent; make a radio internship bear credit of some sort (missing that communications major these days, eh?); involve student groups in each and every one of these questions (Comm School is always looking for 'real life' situations for its students to work on).

Jeffrey Fisher | July 2, 2010 12:54 pm
This I admit I'm not sure about. Maybe promote the opportunities for creativity and artistic initiative in putting their sets together, the opportunity to expand their knowledge and appreciation of the varieties even within larger genres like rock, jazz, folk, or classical?

Liz Rhodes | July 2, 2010 10:09 am
While the community of Charlottesville is its greatest benefactor, WTJU is a college radio station. If WTJU wants to reach the students, then they have to provide the genre that most students prefer- Rock. And, they need to keep the rock programming fresh and unique as it is now. They need to keep the Rock hours during the day and in the night, and provide opportunities for students to come in and intern or volunteer.

Aaron Margosis | July 2, 2010 1:57 am
Increase visibility. E.g., co-sponsor events with other groups such as the Music Dept and make sure that WTJU91.1FM branding is visible. (How about advertising WTJU on WNRN?!)

Jeff Roberts | July 2, 2010 1:36 am
Didn't you ask the first part of this question above? If you are getting students involved then you've reached potential interns/volunteers. Reaching students generally should take care of the reaching the smaller, self-selecting group that become directly involved with the station. There are only so many DJ slots, and this is not a career path for many. Marketing is such a general, viable career path. So the best avenue for student participation in larger numbers is getting students involved in researching listener demographics, preferences, and donations.

Jack Andrews | July 1, 2010 5:42 pm
Kids are always checking the bulletin boards for coming events or for second hand items for sale. Why not post the WTJU music Schedule (music type/DJs) as well.

Gwen Loehr | July 1, 2010 12:16 pm
Become attractive to the students. Let them see WTJU as a multi-dimensional outlet for their expression. Through music as well as talk shows, not just the news.

Scott Cohen | July 1, 2010 11:49 am
Perhaps the entire management and executive board should consist of students paid a stipend rather than professional radio types, if that is the case.

Michael Brooks | July 1, 2010 1:04 am
1) Table tents in the cafeteria 2) Barter advertising with student organizations

Kirsten Schofield | June 30, 2010 8:36 pm
See above. The station needs to come out of its hiding place and interface with the very people that they seek as volunteers. Tons of students think we're 91.9, and still more think we're KISS. There are a lot of people who would love to volunteer if we'd give them the information and the opportunity.

Katherine Perdue | June 30, 2010 8:35 pm
It's simple. Advertise. Tell students that WTJU exists. Go after students in music classes and maintain a presence at the Activities Fair. Offer class credit for volunteering. Have meetings on how to get involved. Put up fliers. I talked to a DJ I knew once about volunteering, which happened because I asked her about it, but in the four years I was there, I don't remember ever hearing from anyone else that it was even a possibility.

Matt Pysher | June 30, 2010 5:34 pm
We should try to be more visible to freshmen during their first couple of weeks on campus. We should have a strong presence at student activity fairs. We could also have volunteers (preferably current students) DJing outside of the dorms during move-in days.

James Ford | June 30, 2010 4:24 pm
Many students are totally unaware of WTJU in the first place; more public events like dance parties, film screenings, and concerts sponsored by WTJU would increase our local profile, especially when co-promoted with existing student organizations. Having volunteers on hand to put these events together would also be a great entry-level position for students looking to volunteer with the station.

Terry Stegman | June 30, 2010 3:31 pm
Advertise to all majors, not just those in communication.

Jane Foster | June 30, 2010 3:29 pm
I have no idea of how to reach student volunteers, except through student news papers and possibly at registration?

Bill Davis | June 30, 2010 3:21 pm
Pizza parties...

Elizabeth Hull | June 30, 2010 2:52 pm
Follow the basics of marketing. Return WTJU to Central Grounds where it can be a visible presence for students once again.

Janice Fischer | June 30, 2010 2:03 pm
Get your name out there! This would be a great thing for retired people with good musical knowledge to do to help the community.

Walt Rodney | June 30, 2010 1:34 pm
Rush like other organizations do. Partner with existing student groups (the multi-culti or diversity ones are obvious targets of opportunity) on events.

Virginia Germino | June 30, 2010 10:26 am
I wish someone would put more effort into enlisting minority or international students into becoming volunteers. There could be a lot of education in all directions. But that would mean allowing more freedom and flexibility, not more restraints.

Shana Goldin-Perschbacher | June 30, 2010 10:12 am
Talk to the Media Students Program and the Music Department about joining with them to create a (funded?) internship that would be an HONOR to compete for. UVA students thrive on competition for honors, even when there is no monetary reward. Think about how many things they volunteer for in order to try to live on the Lawn, which not so long ago, no one wanted to do -- think about it, no privacy, you have to walk outside to get to the bathroom... UVA figured out that if students had to compete for a chance to live on the Lawn because it was seen as a huge honor, then it would become popular and they'd have no problem filling those rooms, which then are a big draw for tourists who are always peeking into the rooms and thinking how quaint the campus is. Students give Gold Key tours on campus for free, which is a PAID job at most other universities! But they do it because it's a competitive honor to be chosen to give those tours, and it makes them more likely to get to live on the Lawn. Reach out to classes (I know, it sounds exhausting imagining the regular reaching out before each semester to find interested professors and classes, but professors often repeat classes from year to year, so if they are committed and have found a way to work with the station, it will be less work for everyone to continue some relationship once it's established). Offer opportunities for students to create audio postcards from abroad, or report on a project that they're working on in class. If they enjoy the one-time project that they contributed, they will be more likely to come back to volunteer.

mary jo ayers | June 30, 2010 7:17 am
MANY PEOPLE HAVE SUGGESTED GIVING CLASS CREDIT FOR VOLUNTEER PARTICIPATION. THIS IS DONE AT THE UVA ART MUSEUM WITH GREAT SUCCESS FOR THE DOCENT EDUCATION PROGRAM AND THE MUSEUM

Rick Mangione | June 30, 2010 2:16 am
references from those who benefitted from their experiences at the station

Jim Jones | June 29, 2010 11:13 pm
volunteers are great if they truley come to be inservice to what you have going. Simply volunteering doesn't give one the vote to change things just because they are there. Inservice to, not there to muck up the works.

Leni Sorensen | June 29, 2010 9:44 pm
Perhaps via the theatre department? Is there a class on radio/broadcasting? Free pizza?

Melissa | June 29, 2010 9:40 pm
See above. Being relevant to them is also helpful. There are many students interested in classical and jazz, but way more interested in folk and rock. And where the heck is hip hop and rap????

Laura | June 29, 2010 8:57 pm
get together with the music/history/anthropology departments. court more grad students! have a completely student based/produced UVA show.

Cafe Lady | June 29, 2010 8:54 pm
WTJU already reaches students - but it could be amplified by a steady partnership between WTJU and UVa in a joint calendar that gives WTJU staffers and volunteers time to coordinate student activities with WTJU promotional time. Does WTJU need an invitation to be part of Homecoming? Can UVa reach out to WTJU? An up-tic in WTJU's information technology would provide an avenue to reach students who are already utilizing pod-casts on a daily basis, or listening to music via the internet. Strength there is strength for the future.

Susanna | June 29, 2010 7:56 pm
Ask for volunteers who collect music, are perhaps already DJs themselves.

Joyce Dudek | June 29, 2010 7:56 pm
Advertising? Events, better community outreach.

Elizabeth Brickhouse | June 29, 2010 4:48 pm
Ditto

Jennifer | June 29, 2010 3:59 pm
Do regular outreach at events (have sign up sheets for potential DJs), air announcements about joining the station over the air, do online posts on Facebook and Twitter calling for potential DJs, visit classes on campus (especially music), put WTJU paraphernalia in welcome packets for new students. Advertise in campus publications.

David Soyka | June 29, 2010 1:57 pm
Publicize its existence. All the obvious venues.

Mark Hineline | June 29, 2010 1:15 pm
Work at many schools at UVA could translate well to radio- it would require coordination with professors and outreach to students, but there are many possibilities: Anthropology, Archaeology, Film Studies, Media Studies, History, Politics, etc. When I was a DJ at WTJU, I don't recall many African American staff, and audio journalism connected with African American Studies could be an excellent opportunity to connect local history with current events and expand awareness and listeners.

Joey Conover | June 29, 2010 12:23 pm
Broadcasting class

wynne Stuart | June 29, 2010 11:16 am
Connect with the UIP, which runs a course including an internship. To gain student attention, the entity or activity involved needs to become cool.

Greg Raymond | June 29, 2010 11:10 am
Advertise

Max Friedfeld | June 29, 2010 9:15 am
more advertising on grounds

Nicole Radshaw | June 29, 2010 8:28 am
Become a greater presence at University events: job fairs, sports games.

Tes Slominski | June 29, 2010 12:33 am
I suspect a lot of (folk) volunteers used to come from the Prism volunteer pool--that's how I got involved (I volunteered at the station for several years in the late 90s and early 00s--Atlantic Weekly II, etc.). How often does WTJU have brochures out at concerts, or "recruiters" in attendance? Reach volunteers where they're already physically present and thinking about the music they love--whether it's a chamber music concert at UVA, a rock show at the Bridge, jazz night at Miller's (if that still happens), or a folk show at the Southern. And make sure that WTJU representatives at such events are volunteers, rather than management. Most of the time, volunteers are at shows anyway!

Michelle Vermillion | June 28, 2010 10:46 pm
Ensure that WTJU is in attendance at any event where students are recruited for volunteer positions within the University community.

Pam Roland | June 28, 2010 9:45 pm
See suggestions above.

Robyn Kells | June 28, 2010 7:32 pm
First of all, offer official internships through the University Intern Program, in a variety of areas (announcing, market research, development activities, publicity projects, newswriting/public affairs programming, etc.). Export the fabulous WTJU announcers as event DJs at student functions...focusing on high-profile times of year such as reunion weekend, homecoming, parents' weekend, etc. and perhaps pairing specific DJs with specific student groups (I would LOVE to see the Danza Latina crew DJ an Allianza event, for example). Give student music groups an opportunity to perform live and promote any upcoming shows. Work closely with the music department to promote their concerts--interviewing Wu Man was one of the coolest things I've ever done, period, and it helped our friends at the music dept as well. Win-win.

Emma Whittington | June 28, 2010 7:26 pm
Participate in the Student Activities Fair, flyer, word of mouth, show up to shows and pass out flyers.

Starrie Williamson | June 28, 2010 4:00 pm
Redesign the logo and image. It needs to look more hip and fresh. Advertise around campus. Promote pictures that show U.Va. students involved with the station.

Aaron Bailey | June 28, 2010 12:25 pm
Continue to allow freedom of choice in programming.

Vic Szabo | June 28, 2010 11:39 am
Get a table at the student activites fair. Advertise interning and DJing opportunities. Update the website so it looks fresh and exciting.

anne metz | June 28, 2010 11:15 am
Maybe announcing volunteer opportunities on the air or on the web? perhaps with facebook. Make it easier for people to figure out how to participate, even if it is just for the marathon.

Marcia Day Childress | June 27, 2010 8:27 pm
Be more visible, active, and welcoming in the student community, with undergrad and grad students; offer open houses; offer courses and co-curricular activities that welcome and solicit student support; engage local high school students in station activities, with opportunities for UVA students to mentor those younger "interns" or volunteers

Thomas Pease | June 27, 2010 6:10 pm
As a community member, I don't think you should emphasize the student to the deteriment of community members' involvement. If I had time to volunteer, I would be, as I have worked at many public radio stations in the past.

Sandy Snyder | June 27, 2010 5:40 pm
Be visible! The logo should be more prominent on the home page, banners and tables set up at the bookstore, Newcomb Hall info desk, etc.

Bill Tetzeli | June 27, 2010 4:00 pm
This is to Burr - Burr, you mentioned that while students were well represented in the rock department, jazz, folk and classical needed a lot more student involvement. I'm not sure about the other two, but I'm certain that for jazz John D'earth at the University is the go-to guy. He's very engaged with his students beyond the classroom, often inviting them to sit in with his group. I've met many of them and they are a very enthusiastic and knowledgeable bunch. John's a mover and shaker in his own field and if you want something done, especially concerning jazz, there's no better person to go to than him.

Anne Becker | June 27, 2010 3:39 pm
Are there formal internships for the communications/journalism majors?

Jay hertel | June 27, 2010 1:59 pm
The station needs to partner with other music-related organizations on grounds (University Program Council, PK German, Springfest, Department of Music,...) to promote concerts, music-related films, and other such events. WTJU should be ubiquitous at all music-related events on grounds.

Zoe | June 27, 2010 2:23 pm
Where are all the WTJU stickers that used to appear on every Volvo and bike? Give them out along with program schedules and lists of volunteer opportunities at booths on the Lawn, through mailings. I hate to suggest it, but use e-mail. Ask Madison House and the UVa Art Museum how they do it. And above all, keep WTJU COOL: this is a great forum for creativity, and UVa students have plenty of it.

Elizabeth Stark | June 27, 2010 11:46 am
-Ads in student publications. -Better presence at UVa table events. Have materials in whatever welcome kit goes to new students. -Better graphic design. Young people are more design savvy than ever before, and much of the TJU literature is boring and doesn't seem hip. This is ******especially****** true of the t-shirts. Rock needs it's own shirt, and the shirt needs to be cool. The Nico's eyes shirt (1999?) was an awesome shirt. -Better website.

Mark Quigg | June 26, 2010 7:19 pm
Integration w class requirements

Khristina VanHall | June 26, 2010 6:58 pm
Contact professors in applicable departments.

Anthony Gallo | June 25, 2010 10:31 am
student activities fair, the Declaration, flyering, sponsoring shows

Geof Carter | June 25, 2010 6:59 am
See above. Offer daytime and evening music programs that would potentially appeal to culturally sophisticated 20 year olds.

Kirsten Miles | June 25, 2010 6:51 am
Initially an incentive program could create a high profile exposure through Student affairs, the program council and word of mouth. The Hive utilized this method of increasing student involvement very successfully. Soliciting sponsors by asking for donations of "prizes" for participation and feedback is one way of increasing involvement quickly, especially if it is done early in the semester when students are allocating time.

Jordan Taylor | June 25, 2010 2:39 am
- Class Visits - Coordination with teachers in jazz, classical, folk and folklore classes as well as rock. Having students preparing presentations or curating short collections that could then be aired as part of their classes (or podcasted or made available for download) - Having WTJU programming integrated with the university calendar and web site. If lectures are public information shown on screens, websites and calendars. Why not WTJU shows. - Signage on campus or a lean guerilla marketing campaign. A funny compelling ad campaign would go a long way towards letting students know the place exists!

Stuart Gilchrist | June 24, 2010 6:23 pm
Market the station.

Jessie Abbate | June 24, 2010 5:45 pm
see above - make it more inviting and less intimidating. and opportunities for less regular shows - like once or twice a month so that each person doesn't feel overwhelmed.

David Lee | June 24, 2010 4:51 pm
Work through departments. Sponsor more on-grounds events. Get the brand/logo more visible on grounds.

U.Va. employee and music fan | June 24, 2010 4:38 pm
Perhaps it should be in the information packet first-years receive. There are many low-cost ways to promote WTJU to the students. Changing the station across the board won't do it.

Zachary Wheat | June 24, 2010 4:35 pm
I feel the station should be marketed and publicized to students more than it has -- through Student Affairs, the Progam Council, more formal programs aimed at student involvement, for example. We should be encouraging outreach to students whenever and wherever possible if we are going to continue to rely on Student Fees as a major source of station revenue.

Increasing Listenership:

What are your ideas for attracting, and then keeping, listeners?

Hot-Rod | July 23, 2010 7:23 pm
Keep Reggae Vibrations on the air. My weekend starts every Friday afternoon at 2PM!!!

Rose Ann | July 23, 2010 6:30 pm
More promotion. As new residents, we came on WTJU almost by accident. We've been committed listeners since then, but didn't find an easy way to learn about everything of interest to us. (There's lots that we listen to regularly, now, especially opera, vocal, and classical programs.)

Nick | July 23, 2010 5:36 pm
a few ways to attract and keep listeners is to provide a more content-rich and dynamic website; to have more live-show sponsorship and more presence out in the community; to institute a regular email newsletter/guide; and to better promote of all of this, on grounds and in the community.

Katie Vogel | July 23, 2010 1:19 pm
I think getting students involved in WTJU is a great idea (guest djs, etc) because other students will tune in just to listen to their friends, and then they may listen to other shows as well. I like when WTJU advertises for future shows because then I'll tune in specifically for that show.

Scott Pettis | July 23, 2010 11:57 am
More advertising and audience expansion on the internet and expanding your audience from there. I hope the station doesn't degenerate into some commercially oriented radio that anyone can hear anywhere. I really think this is the type of format that should attract a worldwide audience, particularly among (professional class) alumni. It seems to me that internet advertising (if revenue is an issue) would be an untapped source of revenue for a station of this quality. It also seems to me that the college would WANT to project a more sophisticated/cultured image than a station that is only interested in focusing on the general public.

Daniel J Holm | July 21, 2010 7:27 pm
Announce more often the various programming throughout the day. Have shorter "marathons" more often, rather than long marathons once or twice a year.

Philip Stafford | July 21, 2010 3:54 pm
I think most of the readers of the two town weekly papers, C'ville and The Hook, would be avid listeners, if they aren't already. Figure out a way to cross promote with these publications, or perhaps occasionally advertise.

George | July 21, 2010 2:11 pm
Change the format! Qualify the announcers. Expand the music genres and stay away from main stream commercial music. More quality programing and better verity of music.

Brian Keena | July 20, 2010 10:52 pm
Keep the same great programming that has made WTJU a cultural gem in a corporate wasteland. Hire a professional grant writer/fundraiser. Include WTJU on the UVA web home page.

bob bradley | July 20, 2010 12:58 pm
more interdisciplinary collaboration, bring in data analytics and social media/networking into the mix. offer students a platform to build portfolios of NPR-styled information/educational/feature productions. again, see dr. megan raymond's work with the dmsc governors challenge; she used ACC innovation money to make the event happen!!

James Shelton | July 19, 2010 11:30 pm
Communty supported all volunteer radio. People will tune into what their friends and fellow students have to say. No outside influence of business.

Bill Sublette | July 19, 2010 6:54 pm
Conduct a multi-channel marketing campaign to let the public know what they can expect to hear and when in the WTJU lineup.

anna magee | July 19, 2010 9:37 am
I'm not sure, perhaps more community awareness?

William Hale | July 19, 2010 7:27 am
The schedule needs to be simpler, so that the average listener does not need to be as tuned in as many of us hard-core folks in order to catch the type of programs that they want. This will work against variety, but it is probably unavoidable.

M Jameson-Lee | July 18, 2010 3:36 pm
Diversity is key - students want to know that they can tune in and hear something that won't be played anywhere else. If they wanted predictability they would listen to other radio stations or go online.

Neil Means | July 18, 2010 12:03 pm
First, as John Dean said, you need better data. I think Burr said Arbitron bases its Charlottesville area ratings on notebooks from 150 potential listeners. I'm no statistician, but that sounds like a dangerously small sample from which to draw any important conclusions.

Tim Ballo | July 17, 2010 9:00 pm
Better marketing will be more effective than changing what makes WTJU unique.

Brian Rakita | July 17, 2010 6:10 pm
Good folks, In 1994, I had a chance to move to Louisa from my hometown for work. I was to work long days in my garage making hammocks for a local business and I thought it wasn't worth it, but a friend suggested I try 91.1 and I decided I could do it. Was the jazz marathon and I fell in love. Then I caught a dead show, some blues, some interesting new rock, and some amazing folk the nest week. I took the contract for a few years and WTJU through that time was practically my backbone. Tom Morgan was the best DJ ever!!! Always lov to catch Professor Beebob, Bill Tatselli, Fred Boise (back in the day), Rebeca, Tell Us a Tale, the Cosmic American Jamberee, Leftover Biscuits, the Crank of Dawn, the Eclectic Woman, Induced to Jutter, Nuthin but the Blues, and many others!! I donated a few hammocks to auction off at your fund drives when I did them, and I have always given when I could. I strongly urge the folks there not to change such that y'all dilute the quality of the station from what I have known. I could listen to KPFA or WWOZ on the net instead if you split off too much, but I still actually prefer the WTJU I've enjoyed for the last 15 years to those.

Nancy Deutsch | July 16, 2010 3:57 pm
I think that keeping the announcer based programming is essential - don't turn it into a vanilla pudding station. That said, streamlining genres by time of day, so that people can know that if they tune in during the afternoon they get the general genre of music they like, could help. but I don't support the idea of mandating particular play lists or music within genres.

Kristofer Monson | July 16, 2010 10:17 am
keep playing fantastic music, like jazz. it is a rare and valuable treasure!

David Cosper | July 16, 2010 12:39 am
A clearer and more regular schedule of offerings might help. I've heard some listeners complain that they never know what they're going to get when they tune in from one day to the next. (On the other hand, I like that about WTJU.) But it may not be realistic to expect new listeners accustomed to single-format mainstream commercial radio to follow a complicated, rotating schedule of shows. The diversity of the station's offerings is a strength, but the challenge that follows it is presenting new listeners with a coherent identity. In my discussions with non-listeners, I sense that some of them are simply confused by the hour-to-hour switches between classical, talk, jazz, rock, and folk programming.

Peter Tschirhart | July 15, 2010 10:28 pm
Add some UVA-specific journalism programming. Then tell parents on orientation day to listen between XYZ hours on Sunday evenings to hear news and interviews from the perspective of their children.

Michael Heny | July 15, 2010 9:23 pm
I'm fine with the mumbling DJ, but it turns some people off. Have new DJ's mentor with established DJ's--there are many excellent, seasoned ones to choose from.

Thatcher Stone | July 15, 2010 9:09 am
stream to the web, alumni mailing, a "TJU" Jazz weekend festival in Charlottesville.

eve schwartz | July 15, 2010 8:54 am
The Office of Public Affaris needs to take the lead in making TJU better known with the University and C'ville. Our area has a well-educated populace that appreciates the arts. The station's eclectic nature should be its biggest selling point--there is something for everyone here.

Marybeth Collins | July 15, 2010 12:15 am
In regard to keeping listeners, I think one of the greatest blessings of WTJU (genre diversity) is also a bit of a curse. "Average" radio channels keep listeners because they play a genre that the listener prefers, constantly. So WTJU is faced with a unique challenge in creating its own method of retaining a listener base that is in keeping with its unique style and identity. Brainstorm new and creative ideas that will fit WTJU's unique situation. Perhaps there could be improvement in assigning genres into more predictable and more listener-friendly time slots. Once cemented in concrete, heavily advertise particular shows. I personally love the Blues shows and would be very happy if this genre were given more air time. Thank you.

Valerie L'Herrou | July 14, 2010 7:25 pm
--Where are the TJU bumperstickers? I used to see them on cars all over town. Cheap and effective, as the person who sees it can immediately take action by tuning in. --Cross-promotion with WVTF and WMRA, and public television. --Ads on Facebook. More use of fb to promote. --Bring back WTJU concert series. They were a lot of work, but brought a lot of listeners. WTJU should be part of promotion of ALL music on grounds.

Tom Tartaglino | July 14, 2010 8:13 am
I don't think you are loosing listeners. I could not pledge last marathon because of the economy. I still am a loyal listener. Is it possible you are mistaken about loss of listenership. Maybe in a good economy you will have better response to your fund raising and not think you lost anyone.

MW | July 13, 2010 10:49 pm
Promote Promote Promote the station and its unique programming ... our potential listeners include anyone who attends a music concert (classical, jazz, rock, etc); and UVa faculty, staff and students.

Ginny Chilton | July 13, 2010 8:39 pm
Look for ways to promote community music events. Invite the leaders of these groups to be interviewed in a program based on the group's genre/upcoming show/etc. Members and friends of that group will tune in, and get hooked. Can TJU go on the road? Broadcast live from a community event. You can either broadcast a live music performance, or interrupt a normal TJU program to give periodic updates live from a community event.

Jocelyn Pace | July 13, 2010 7:52 pm
More variety.

Patsy Goolsby | July 13, 2010 3:42 pm
Perhaps you could have an e-mail list with the schedule. Do you already? I don't know about it. Could you add me to it?

Katherine Greiner | July 13, 2010 3:39 pm
For attracting listeners- creative ads in weekly papers, sponsoring events-- ways that would not just get the name out there, but also make clear what WTJU offers. For keeping listeners- not going to rotation, and instead keeping shows that expand listeners knowledge around and enjoyment of music.

Howard Vidaver | July 13, 2010 10:56 am
Scheduled programs should be longer in duration. More classical and live programming will help hold listeners.

Roger Clarke | July 13, 2010 4:15 am
WTJU is a polished gem. To gain it a wider audience, expand podcast capabilities for every dj and for each department (Classical, Jazz, Rock, Folk, Radio Journalism). Create a dedicated podcast production studio at WTJU (with 3-4 podcast-editing pc or mac stations) to supplement the already fine on-air and performance studios. Invest in greatly expanded bandwidth to serve a greatly expanded number of streaming or podcast listeners. It is in no way necessary to alter the free-form expressiveness and breathtaking diversity of musics currently represented on WTJU. Do not filter or constrict content to misguidedly conform to "popular taste". Don't impose any "rotation" of cuts dj's would be required to play. Continue to allow and encourage "team dj-ing" in any given time-slot, so that the number and diversity of djs and musics remain bountiful and growing. Encourage djs' brevity in announcements, while remaining flexible. Commit to 100% uncompressed digitization to preserve the highest sound quality. Introduce locally produced longform journalism/recitation/theatre into unused overnight hours.

Don Harrison | July 12, 2010 11:58 pm
WTJU"s internet access needs to be updated for one-click access, and to a number of formats. There are too many sound options out there to expect people to fight to hear the station - we need to make it easy for them (and inviting). And the station needs to make Podcasting a priority and make linking to the main WTJU site easier. The more people hear us, the more they like us. So let's have them hear us.

Werner K. Sensbach | July 12, 2010 11:42 pm
Increase classical programming because the lack of it seems a big void in Central Virginia

Susan C Scott | July 12, 2010 10:34 pm
Have been listening to this station for 47 years since I came to UVA as a graduate student. It has been the only source of classical music and opera (excluding the few months of Met broadcasts) for all these years. I am devoted to and grateful for your classical programing and plan my time to listen. Have begun to make time for Anne Paroti's show.

Jim Mandell | July 12, 2010 8:32 pm
WTJU, as the best free-form radio station in the world, now has much of the global population as its listener base-- on the internet. Look at what WFMU (who falsely claim the title of best free-form radio) has done in attracting worldwide listenership and marathon donations: http://wfmu.org/marathon/map.php WTJU can do this too. What would it take to get WTJU to be listed (as WFMU is already) on the default iTunes Radio stations? The iTunes Radio tab is how I discovered WFMU.

Linn Harrison | July 12, 2010 6:00 pm
Maintain the diversity of programming informed by knowledgble volunteers, student or otherwise. Perhaps increasing live music progamming particularly local performers, would increase interest. Perhaps soliciting requests/suggestions for musical genres to be included and offering opportunities to create playlists or collaborate with experienced station staff on a show.

Khalil Hassan | July 12, 2010 4:24 pm
Don't change the format.

Toni Barskile | July 12, 2010 3:59 pm
I would listen more if I knew when the shows I like are on. I'll admit that I've been listening more since I heard about the proposed changes. I listen to radio in general more in the morning and early afternoon. Since I know that I can hear good jazz in the a.m. I'm more likely to listen then. I don't know if grouping all of the shows of a given genre together in blocks @ the same time every day is the answer, but at least it will give listeners a better idea of when to expect the shows that they like. Diversity of programming needs to be stressed because that's what separates WTJU from the rest of the radio stations around here, many of which I consider "lowest common denominator" programming. There are only 2 or 3 radio stations that I think play songs for people who really love music.

Beth Burnam | July 12, 2010 3:25 pm
Publicize the station. Publicize the programming. It sells itself once you're hooked.

Rob Sheffield | July 12, 2010 3:05 pm
Archiving shows online will help. A better website will help reach listeners. (Students know more about this sort of project than their elders do, which is why their input is so vital.)

Virginia Daugherty | July 12, 2010 2:38 pm
Advertising the station more would help. WTJU has many great shows that are never publicly promoted.

Keith Alnwick | July 12, 2010 2:31 pm
Attract: Low-intensity, widespread guerrilla marketing - chalk, flyers, stickers, etc.. Quality merchandise / great design. More sponsorship of live music events around town. Keep: Emphasize and maintain both the quality and diversity of programming. Keep alumni contacted about fundraisers and schedules, make it easy to stream WTJU or catch up with your favorite program.

Bryan Wright | July 12, 2010 2:23 pm
First, we live in the world of the "long tail", where the internet makes it possible for media with niche appeal to reach a sparse, but large, audience scattered around the world. WTJU's web presence may be critical to its future success. In addition to this outward thrust, the station needs to work locally, by strengthening its ties to the community. Re-instituting collaborations like the one the station once had with the Prism might be a good start. Finally, we need to clear that this is a University which has "education" and "public outreach" as two of its three core missions. WTJU clearly contributes to these. Although listenership is an interesting metric, a more important question is "How can the station better serve the University's core mission?".

Michael Holroyd | July 12, 2010 1:48 pm
At the end of the day, programs with low numbers of listeners just need to go. Sorry! Some DJs are boring, don't take their work seriously, or just play music the audience doesn't enjoy.

Peter Hedlund | July 12, 2010 12:22 pm
Concert sponsorship. WTJU festival with live music somewhere at UVa open to the public.

Lynn Hedlund | July 12, 2010 12:02 pm
One way to raise funds is to threaten to change the music format. I don't think that students on the whole listen to radio that much anymore so focusing on the community is a better direction.

Dennis DaLuiso | July 12, 2010 11:51 am
The community will respond if they see the University butting out of policy decisions. The past GM of the station did not standup for the autonomy of the station. This is one cause of a withdrawal of generalized support.

Carol chandross | July 12, 2010 11:17 am
As long as there is classical I will listen. You can put info in dorms and in newcomer packets. I fear a loss of classics will lead to a loss of money.

Kate Nesbitt | July 12, 2010 11:17 am
Rainbow minute is a great new addition. Don't care for Amy Goodman's show Democracy America. Like Business Plan's idea to add BBC headlines hourly.

kate nesbitt | July 12, 2010 10:39 am
wtju's diversity is its unique feature. It's what I have loved as a student (ARCH '79) and faculty (SARCH 91-98) and community member/listener. No other station can offer this. I miss BBC, but understand that you had to let it go when WVTF started Radio IQ. I think many potential listeners listen to WVTF.

Michael Ludgate | July 12, 2010 10:14 am
Even if you have an eclectic program schedule the listener has to know what they going to get when they tune in.

Pam Howie | July 12, 2010 8:52 am
Canceling the evening classical music programming will lose me as a listener during that time! Classical is so named for a reason----it stands the test of time. All the other genres also have their time-tested work, but I find a bunch to be tiresome to listen to again and again. I also enjoy the folk programming on Thursday and Friday but I prefer the classical so I would not like expanding the folk into the classical programing time. I do not listen to jazz, so the radio goes off when jazz comes on---which doesn't mean it shouldn't be there, it should, just that I don't listen to that.

Carla Arton | July 12, 2010 7:41 am
Morning talk show. Include an eclectic music hour with more alternative indie stuff instead of just rock that was mainstream 10 years ago (or at least sounds like it). I went to the concert with Schneider and One Eskimo, which was fantastic. More stuff like that and publicity for it would be great.

David Callihan | July 12, 2010 7:13 am
The current format is not conducive for listening...there are too many divergent types of music and they are only played for short blocks. The music I enjoy is played at add times and for short periods so I don't usually listen to the station. I would suggest looking for a few themes to endorse and having larger blocks of similar programming. I think you should look at KPIG as a model - they play great music and most of it does not get play on commercial stations, but it is high quality music. Dump the classical programming and cut back on jazz; increase people like John Hiatt, Fred Eaglesmith, Dylan,Los Loboa, Todd Snider, Robert Earl Keen. You could maybe also emphasize Virginia's bluegrass heritage.

Joan Fenton | July 12, 2010 6:53 am
Do a market analysis to see when the best times are for each genre of music WTJU features. Partner with the Cav Daily and see if they will run ads for the station in return for the station promoting the Cav Daily

Mike Krueger | July 12, 2010 2:27 am
The station should offer excellent programming. Whether people want to listen or not is their own concern. I can't see why a state university should care about people's radio-listening habits. It's not selling anything. Maybe they have something better to do. But when they choose or chance to listen-- then great radio is a great public good. It should be giving a gift, not making a sale.

Susanna Spencer | July 11, 2010 11:42 pm
Be slightly different from WNRN, especially regarding timing of programming types. For example, don't both nrn and tju do a grateful dead program sat am? To me, your biggest competitor is nrn, then the npr station out of Harrisonburg.

J May | July 11, 2010 9:46 pm
CONTINUE the diverse programming with early morning jazz, Saturday Atlantic Weekly (West and East of the Atlantic) and Grateful Dead at noon on Saturdays, Reggae in the afternoons. . . Professor BeBop has been a great Friday evening show for YEARS! Do NOT, repeat, do NOT erase classical programming. It is much appreciated by this listener

Peter Henderson | July 11, 2010 6:58 pm
It depends on what kind of station you have. You could increase the listenership by playing more mainstream music, getting rid of clasical music and jazz and so on, but that isn't WTJU's proper role in the University and the community. As a station dedicated to programming a diversity of styles and emphasizing music which is culturally significant or off the beaten path, the station is already doing a great job, so my only idea would be to get the word out. One thing I really love about the station is the personal touch. The announcers are from the community and you can call them up and chat about the music. Try that with NPR! I think the listenership is probably pretty good if you take into account that classical music and jazz don't appeal to most people (nor does Shakespeare.) I don't trust the survey that was done, having worked with a survey company. But so long as dumbing down the programming is kept off the table, go ahead and try to build the listener base. doesn't devote itself to teaching whatever is most popular I would also oppose going to more popular or commercial format to attract the 'mainstream.' WTJU has a cultural and educational mission as part of UVA, which likes to think of itself as an elite institution. Dumbing down WTJU would challenge that self-image. However, I don't see why the late night hours couldn't be freed up to allow students (or others) to do the more off-beat, edgy programming and announcing I used to hear from the station many years ago. More freedom and creativity, not less, is what WTJU can offer to the student community. Also, I don't think UVA should give any importance to training future radio professionals if it means constant turnover and dumping all the fine announcers and other personnel they have now. In general, the cultural mission of WTJU is more important than vocational training in handling a console.

Josh Mandell | July 11, 2010 6:55 pm
Advertise how different WTJU is from other stations. If you measured "artists played per week" and compared it to competing stations, I'm sure WTJU would blow them away.

Henry Wiencek | July 11, 2010 5:48 pm
Play good music. That's what keeps me coming back and donating.

Phyllis Binder | July 11, 2010 12:49 pm
I have listened to the station for decades and have expanded my enjoyment of music in all genres as a result of this experience. What a good radio station offers that downloading music does not is hearing a familiar voice live, and having the advantage of music selected from their perspective, and opportunities to listen to interviews and discussion about creating/performing music. Perhaps outreach in the form of shows or interviews done at locations where there are many people who would be potentially interested, and inviting their participation in some way compatible with a music show would enhance listenership.

Steve Guion | July 11, 2010 9:56 am
DO you realize that at this point you have asked me the same question three different ways? Who came up with this lame survey? Promotion. Give them a reason to want to listen to the station. Be different. Distinguish yourself from your competition.

Pamela Blevins | July 11, 2010 8:46 am
It is obvious from the survey results so far that classical music is the single most popular genre on WTJU. Increase the classical programming, do not diminish it or eliminate it. In 2004, WETA in Washington DC decided to eliminate classical programming entirely and revert to an all-news and talk format. Donors withdrew their support in large numbers and eventually the market ratings of WETA fell. The sad part of this fiasco is that WETA held public hearings but they were a sham because the decision had already been made and the public input was never going to be considered. I hope that the same is NOT true of WTJU!!

Vern Buchanan | July 11, 2010 7:59 am
Better /more t4ransmitters /repeater sites . The world in not only high tech its mobile , NRNS success is due to their ability to reach out .

Lori Derr | July 10, 2010 8:03 pm
I think that the lack of repetition and deeply researched jazz shows are extremely appealing as they are. Some of the DJs are quite masterful at constructing playlists that relate and build on each song...I mostly listen to jazz in the mornings. My favorite days are Wednesdays,Tuesdays, Thursdays, and Fridays. WTJU should continue to reflect the rich and diverse musical environment that we live in here in Charlottesville with a continued emphasis on classical and jazz.

Aaron Zatcoff | July 10, 2010 4:20 pm
Market what we do to potential listeners. They need to know about us and too many people don't even know WTJU exists. We aren't for everybody although we could be. Not everyone wants to be educated or be adventurous with regard to particular musical genres, but those who do will want to listen to us. We could be sending playlists via email to contributors that request them.

kevin burns | July 10, 2010 3:42 pm
Advertising the station should be an ongoing effort in as much local and internet media as possible on a minimum budget. Bringing local and touring artists into the studio on a regular basis to tie in w/local events and giving away tickets to these events might help.

Marianne Montgomery | July 10, 2010 3:05 pm
I don't think WTJU needs a format change. I do think, though, that adding top-of-the-hour NPR news, assuming it didn't interfere with programming long selections, would help to keep listeners from turning away on the hour to hear the latest news on other public radio stations.

Prue Thorner | July 10, 2010 2:17 pm
News bulletins on a more regular basis would be useful. Just broadcasting Democracy Now at 4pm is not enough news for most people. A 5 minute bulletin at 9 am, noon and 6pm would be welcome. Broadcasting some top local musicians such as John D'earth, Robert Jospe, Jeff Decker, as well as classical musicians when they perform locally (at Millers, in Cabell Hall, or on the concert space downtown) would be a big draw. Some of the performers might be persuaded to give permission for recording and broadcasting as a tax deductible donation to TJU.

Tim Beeghly | July 10, 2010 1:31 pm
Keep the 4 specific and separate fundraising marathons through out the academic year. 7 days each as opposed to 4 days each currently. Again more agressive marketing of our fundraisers and their specific themes.

Ruth Cross | July 10, 2010 10:48 am
Include WTJU within the purview of the President's Council for the Arts Use the Office of Public Affairs to present WTJU to the publis instead of planning to dumb it down. In short, connect the station to the main enterprise of the U.

Dan Goldberg | July 10, 2010 10:18 am
By its nature I think the current format draws from a population that looking for a broader view of music than commercial radio. In addition, WTJU competes for that small population with stations like WNRN. One possibility is to approach WNRN and explore ways to divide the draw of those populations that are interested in rock programming. Another factor is that WTJU draws from enthusiasts of multiple styles (classical| folk | jazz) etc. Mixing up the times those styles are played may help, draw more people. That may make it harder for people to know when and what to listen to though.

Jace Goodling | July 10, 2010 7:55 am
don't dump your tried and true (historic) programs aand their familiar hosts

Mark Greenfield | July 9, 2010 8:11 pm
Post show lists in area publications. Commercial venues advertise. You should do the same.

Clarice Schermerhorn | July 9, 2010 5:13 pm
Let people know you are here. Keep "Sunrise Magazine" in it's current format and time slot. I am amazed to read on this forum that there is almost no advertising, yet I myself stumbled onto the station by accident one Saturday morning in 1987, now that I think about it. Once you get people to tune in, I think they will stay because the station as it is now is so wonderful and diverse.

Will Harvey | July 9, 2010 4:22 pm
Not sure how accurate ratings are, but I do know that when I listen to another "free" station I keep hearing the same stuff. Ove and over. I like hearing music I haven't necessarily heard before, not music I am already familiar with.

Guinevere Higgins | July 9, 2010 1:22 pm
This survey is a great start. Find out what people want in a community radio station. Also, TJU's online streaming is not very user friendly. I can't get it on my home or work computers, and if it were more accessible, as well as archived, the station could reach a huge number of listeners.

A. Soroka | July 9, 2010 1:15 pm
The University administration has fallen down badly with regard to promoting WTJU. The concrete ideas other submitters have offered are a good place to start fixing that.

Staiger White | July 8, 2010 9:14 pm
I love listening to hear a huge variety of music types that you play, but I have a peeve with the inconsistency in putting playlists on the web site. I did not check that I was a contributor, since I have not contributed every year, but try to do so.

Michael Sokolowski | July 8, 2010 7:00 pm
Don't change directions musically; just do what you do better. Yes, there could be a greater attention to technical detail, pacing, and on-air smoothness. Don't make anyone be who they're not -- but let them find their radio selves. The best DJs are the ones who combine their musical expertise with an ability to communicate and connect with an audience. If you have to talk, say something interesting about the music or a related topic in a way that's respectful and pleasant to listen to. Don't overdo it, either. It's not about you; it's about the music.

David J. Simpson | July 8, 2010 5:41 pm
WTJU can be heard internationally on internet by relatives and friends of students from afar. Feature slots where students are invited to voice their greetings home -- birthday wishes to Mom, for example! This would increase interest in the station, could encourage potential volunteers too..

Matt Ulibarri | July 8, 2010 5:00 pm
This whole conversation about the future of WTJU seems to be free publicity for the station. If harnessed correctly, I can see your number of listeners increasing while keeping the same format for broadcasting.

Woody Parrish | July 8, 2010 4:57 pm
Cultivate the station's greatest assets - the breadth of its musical offerings, and the depth of knowledge and commitment of its long-time volunteers. Thoughtful and diverse programming are a valuable community service, regardless of the size of your audience. Those who are not listening are getting their needs met elsewhere; those who depend on WTJU to nourish musical preferences out of the mainstream will have to give up radio altogether, if you abandon your calling, and join the race to the bottom. I have plenty of other places to hear the popular, but nothing makes me pull out my wallet at pledge time as fast as a station with the nerve and imagination to broadcast italian surf music.

Mary Ann | July 8, 2010 3:28 pm
Instead of focusing your efforts on content (and narrowing it, at that!), focus on upgrading and expanding your delivery media. Your general loss of listenership since 2001 is probably due to the increased use of computers, iPods and smart phones for music and information. Use your Web site the way television networks do, allowing easy access to previously aired programs, so listeners have more of a choice in what to listen to and when to listen to it. Also, a smart phone App may be useful.

Ron Povich | July 8, 2010 2:19 pm
Programming on WTJU should retain its unique, free-form, surprising quality which sets WTJU apart from the increasingly predictable run-of-the-mill radio available on the regional dial. The station could be more consistent in terms of when the different musical genres will be airing, particularly during the weekdays. WTJU volunteers have a wealth of background and expertise in music, so the station should continue to offer classical, jazz, rock, folk/world/roots programming---via a more easily recalled, listener-friendly schedule.

Karen O'Brien | July 8, 2010 2:12 pm
I don't think that this is the issue. The existing format with its wide range of musical styles has something for everyone.

Marietta McCarty | July 8, 2010 11:49 am
This is not a volunteer dj.'s responsibility. Someone is being paid to promote the station, and if the University community unites behind ITS very own station, there will be no problem. Let the station air at sports contests instead of the blaring, numbing noise. Specical programming depending on sport and opponent. Get PVCC's music dept. and faculty behind the station - - i have been at the College for a long time and NEVER heard a promotion, information-sharing, etc. - - - and the College has tight bonds with the University.

Michele Mattioli | July 8, 2010 10:54 am
Keep your excellent independent programming, NOT standardized, pre-programmed formats.

Cyndy Williams | July 8, 2010 9:16 am
I think the fund raising & premium give-aways is a good venue that is used by other similar stations in the area. I was not that aware of the station & the wonderful diversity of the music until my husband mentioned it, now I listen at work on my computer all day. I enjoy all the music forms.

Jeff Carlin | July 8, 2010 8:44 am
Better outreach/marketing. Sponsor events. Increase the web presence. Once people tune in, the amazing shows they'll find will have 'em hooked. *If* they can figure out at what hours they can find the programming they enjoy. The WTJU schedule is a mess, and needs to be consistent on a daily basis so listeners can develop regular habits. This could also be furthered by making it easier for people to tune in online, both by improving the web stream (which I've never been able to get working on my computer), and by archiving shows so they don't have to be listened to only at the time of broadcast.

Colin Campbell | July 7, 2010 10:14 pm
Easier-to-understand program schedule- I should be able to tune in at roughly the same time every day and hear music I like. The entire schedule does not have to appeal to the same group of listeners - WNRN has a large pool of listeners, but I'm willing to bet none of "Acoustic Sunrise" fans also listen to hip-hop "The Boom Box." Eliminating any genres from WTJU's schedule, therefore, would have the opposite of its intended affect. On a smaller scale, cosmetic improvements would help; i.e. shorter, more professional talk breaks with snappier PSAs and promos. Also, WTJU tends to have difficulty achieving the element of surprise that attracts me to radio. I want to hear variety, not across a week's programming, but within individual programs. WTJU should make moves away from hyper-specific genre programs so listeners are pulled in, kept on their toes, and exposed to new musical interests all the while.

Sarah (A & S, 1984) | July 7, 2010 9:34 pm
Keep the innovative programming up. When all stations sound the same, people will be more likely to go right on past the station. When people hear something new and different, they are more likely to pause and say, "What was that?"

Valerie Matthews | July 7, 2010 8:12 pm
As above, and C'ville, The Hook.

Janice Mauroschadt | July 7, 2010 7:14 pm
I think you would have much success with marketing your classical music. I myself have listened to 88.5 (Public Radio) for classical music and had no idea that WTJU even played classical. If you could somehow make the public more aware of that, I believe it would be of great service to the community. I am a private violin and piano instructor and work with many families who LOVE classical music. Classical music is so important to our society and, frankly, we will suffer without it as it sets a standard for beauty and appreciation of other art forms like opera.

William Shoup | July 7, 2010 6:32 pm
Who says you need a bigger listener base? What`s wrong with a creative venue where students can cut their creative teeth and the good old regulars can continue to please and surprise listeners for decades to come.

Bev Ogilvie | July 7, 2010 5:16 pm
Keep doing just what you have been doing so well: Provide a good variety of classical music, along with other styles of music. Few commercial interuptions.

ned oldham | July 7, 2010 5:09 pm
wtju must keep its open format. I can't stress how awful I think it would be to move to a format that required repetition. Repetition is not a strength for Thomas Jefferson's University's station. I lived for seven years in Birmingham, AL, and seven years in Baltimore, MD, neither of which had a good college station; returning to Charlottesville and WTJU has been wonderful for me precisely because I hate repetition, and love hearing new things. I think today's young people have access to so many avenues for discovering new (and old) music that they expect and appreciate the variety wtju provides. By the same token, pop and pay-to-play repetitive "indie rock" stations have become even more homogenized and mindless in their bombastic attempt to hypnotize the lowest common denominator: the masses. Wtju is not for the masses; it is for the renaissance culture that inhabit and surround Charlottesville.

Josh Krahn | July 7, 2010 4:36 pm
The live stream is the key. Increase web presence. Revamp the website and make it easier to stream on more devices.

Margaret Lee | July 7, 2010 3:22 pm
Advertise somewhere.

Peter Welch | July 7, 2010 3:17 pm
What WTJU currently offers is very attractive and will keep listeners if they know about it! Promotion! Greatly expanding promotional efforts, increasing signal direction/strength (especially if the station can be heard better near Richmond, Fredericksburg, etc.), and expanding the station's web presence will bring in the listeners.

Ryan Mann | July 7, 2010 3:05 pm
keep rock programming during the day.

Holly | July 7, 2010 2:54 pm
Increase rock programming, especially during the day.

Swami Jyoti | July 7, 2010 2:38 pm
better reception at a distance

Mike | July 7, 2010 1:58 pm
A more regular format. The patchwork and multiformat schedule does not work and is too confusing. Drop all classical music.

Cindy Benton-Groner | July 7, 2010 1:49 pm
Build on the current strong programming that WTJU already has. Air program from the Miller Center. Broadcast live concerts or other programs. Use the station as a resource for culturally events.

lucinda buxton martin | July 7, 2010 1:10 pm
Let the public know about what you do. The best shows on the radio in Charlottesville are on TJU -- Radio Tropicale/ Folk & Beyond/ the reggae show on Friday afternoon - please don't change your format - just let people know what you already have!!! It is incredible!

Bob Girard | July 7, 2010 12:52 pm
First, get real with the coverage map and realize that this station is smaller than local. The station doesn't - can't - have the reach you might think. WTJU has succeeded as a niche station in a maze of other programming choices, and that's why it's the best station available

Lee Connah | July 7, 2010 12:01 pm
I've been listening to WTJU for 20 years, i lived in the area for 10 years and i've been commuting to the area once a month for another 10 years. when people ask me if Charlottesville is a nice place to live the conversation very quickly turns to WTJU. it is a cultural treasure and one of the very few radio stations of its kind remaining. so if "keeping listeners" is important then don't water the offerings down so it becomes just another forgettable radio station. keep it unique and your following, though potentially smaller, will be loyal.

Bridge Cox | July 7, 2010 11:10 am
To remain true to WTJUs original mission. To keep it diverse, eclectic, and as a way to highlight what is NOT on the radio elsewhere.

Marsha Burger | July 7, 2010 10:14 am
more classical music

Peter Brunjes | July 7, 2010 8:49 am
The listeners you have are _very_ loyal. They are people who are interested in non-mainstream music. There must be many more.. advertising? Promoting events on the downtown mall?

J. M. | July 7, 2010 2:21 am
If WTJU wants to reach out to UVA students, increasing Americana/folk/roots is not the way to go. I think younger students would appreciate the maintenance of a consistent source of alternative, indie programming. They would also be much more likely to get involved with the station, as indie is probably a much more attractive genre for students than folk/roots. The term "rock" does not do that part of the station's programming justice. There aren't other stations in the Charlottesville/UVA area that play the same kind of "rock" music that WTJU does.

Rusty Trainham | July 7, 2010 12:26 am
The best way to attract and keep listeners is to put top notch DJs on the air. DJs who know their music, who are passionate about it, who are self disciplined enough to programme coherently, and who are sensitive and responsive to their listeners will build a following. The other requirement is that the Program Director needs to schedule DJs into the most effective time slots for their target audiences.

Becky Calvert | July 6, 2010 6:53 pm
Again, marketing. Let people know you are out there!!! Make it so WJTU can be streamed on I-tunes. Sponsor some live shows and events. Make your presence known!

Content Sablinsky | July 6, 2010 6:22 pm
I think you have an ardent bunch of classical music supporters out here. Don't throw the baby out with the bath water.

Rick Kast | July 6, 2010 5:35 pm
This is a tough one because great and complex music (which is most of what I listen to on WTJU) will never attract a mass audience. But doesn't it make sense to have a University founded by an insatiably curious intellectual who played Corelli on his violin supporting a station that doesn't reduce itself to pandering to the masses but insists on playing the very best music even if it is to a relatively small audience? Bottom-line orientation here will almost certainly create mediocrity and dreck.

matthew simon | July 6, 2010 4:20 pm
Since so few people in the market have heard of WTJU, increased marketing is guaranteed to lead to greater listenership.

Emily Sloan | July 6, 2010 3:28 pm
More dynamic programming, consistency in quality, better marketing! Get the name out there! Hold concerts. Different fundraiser format (the twice-a-year format that directly competes with WNRN is not wise)

Michaux Hood | July 6, 2010 1:51 pm
1. Online stream - promote. Also, provide the stream in a more univerally acceptable format or additional formats (Currently there is a note on the software that should be downloaded to listen to the stream. We listen exclusively to online radio at our office and I have not enountered this with other stations - their stream formats work fine with players we already use). 2. Coordinate more with the live music venues - playing music of people coming to town, offering live streaming of shows from the venues. People are going to live music in Charlottesville like never before - remind them at the live show that they can get this and other great music on the radio when they can't be at the live show.

Michael D. Mabry (Law 1991) | July 6, 2010 1:24 pm
Is this really an issue? I have never seen a radio station with such devoted listeners as WTJU. WTJU’s listeners have always managed to gravitate to the shows that interest them – what’s the problem? The straw-man critique that one never knows what one will hear when dialing in WTJU is, to me and many others, its greatest strength. Standing behind that is the wonderful expertise of the volunteer DJs, who clearly work hard to bring fresh, original, and sometimes challenging music to a sophisticated audience. My great joy in listening to WTJU is opening my ears to exciting new music that I cannot hear anywhere else. That is a terrific foundation on which to build. I think the internet is your great untapped resource, one that could be used more aggressively in bringing new listeners to the Station from around the world.

Davis Salisbury | July 6, 2010 1:08 pm
Actually committing to upgrading the website via better computer-based listening options! This is 2010, the current method is woefully out of date. This is a basic necessity for a community radio station, and if UVA is to be taken seriously in its attempts to improve WTJU, then this should be priority #1! All web-based media related to the station should be upgraded ASAP. This is also an area that technologically skilled students could help with. I am sure that there are students who could build or contribute to this effort, and would do it for free for academic credit! This would allow listeners to grow significantly by increasing their ability to listen to the station. Also, more promotion in the University grounds, through the methods mentioned above. In my opinion, the proposed drastic changes in programming will be a wash: you will lose most of the listeners WTJU has attracted and trade them for a similar number of newbies. I do not believe that you will keep what you have and build on it at all, you will merely get the same (or worse) results with a new set of credit card numbers and addresses provided in the pledges. Especially if programming leans towards some ambiguous "roots" or Americana focus.

Hal Dean | July 6, 2010 10:58 am
Make the web presence stronger, multi-faceted, and technically rich. Provide easy-to-access containers for listener input. Integrate with SoundCloud and other new media. Link to a more far-ranging set of potential listeners.

Brian Glover | July 6, 2010 10:45 am
Keep up the quality programming. First of all, concentrate on attracting and keeping GREAT DJs. They might be students, or they might not -- but they must be OBSESSIVE about music. With all the online options today, people will listen to live radio for one reason and one reason only: they want to hear tracks chosen in real time by a real person who is brilliant, idiosyncratic, and very, very knowledgeable. Great radio is a performing art. WTJU has some of the best artists in the country. Don't alienate them! Also, speaking of online options -- WFMU's streaming archives are amazing; WTJU should have the same thing. Since I like individual DJs, I LOVE being able to listen to all of their shows from the course of many years, whenever I like. I weep for the Radio Wowsvilles I have missed over the years.

kay slaughter | July 6, 2010 10:03 am
get on the calendars of Cville Weekly and Hook with listenings of music programs. Could this be part of their regular calendars (daily music listenings) Advertise in those two publications with a list of music offerings and days they occur.

John Dean | July 6, 2010 12:15 am
WTJU's greatest strength is the musical sophistication and enthusiasm of its volunteer staff. It's second greatest strength is that it is local to Charlottesville. I think the station should bank on its human assets in the classical, folk, and jazz genres. In each of these areas, WTJU offers more interesting and sophisticated music than its competitors (though they are getting better), and a genuine tie to the local community. Take the music out into the community. Sponsor concerts. Air live performances. Give away music tickets. Make sure that every music lover in Charlottesville knows about the station, and looks to WTJU for music that they like, and that they didn't know they like. The opposite of this approach would be to dumb-down the music and make WTJU a clone of WVTF. As for the rock programming -- in the past, young people turned to WTJU for cutting edge alternative rock. This is no longer true. They can get whatever they want on the internet, and when they listen to the radio it's not likely to be WTJU. I'm afraid that I don't have any suggestions for attracting these listeners.

David Robinson | July 5, 2010 10:44 pm
More outreach: sponsoring events, print advertising, online advertising, ad swaps with other media.

Cal Glattfelder | July 5, 2010 9:12 pm
Use the university's power of promotion through the various papers, tv, sporting events. Let people know the value of your unique programming where the djs delve deep into the music catalogs of multiple genres. That is WTJU's niche, and the listeners appreciate it. More listeners would appreciate it if they knew the station existed. "Check us first" could be added to "the sound choice in Central Virginia".

Malcolm Bell | July 5, 2010 7:08 pm
Programs are often wonderful-- I'm listening to early music now. One turns to WTJU for the music, not the announcements, of which there are perhaps too many. For instance, the Ivy Creek Natural Area could have its own five-minute program (like Bess Murray's nature notes) and announcements for it would not then interupt the music. The frequent plugs for other WTJU programs could also be reduced in number.

Sally Thomas | July 5, 2010 6:35 pm
This is the one station our visiting, adult, children look for when they are in town. It fills a need in our adult lives that no other station fills. Faculty members who have moved tell us that it's the only station they miss and wish other universities had one like it. Are new faculty members and graduate students told of its existence when they come to town? The PSAs could cover more organizations, with a quid pro quo that the organization mention it in their newsletter.

Harvey Liszt | July 5, 2010 5:55 pm
Increase WTJU's presence on the web, it could have a huge audience for the existing mode of operation.

Ann Benner | July 5, 2010 5:32 pm
I love the range of kinds of music and range of personalities of the djs. . . . the personal nature of the shows and the spontaneity... don't understand why there is a listenership problem.

Susie McRae | July 5, 2010 4:17 pm
ADVERTISE! I work in retail and it seems that 1)you've got to have a good product, but 2)you've got to let people know about it. I can't believe that WTJU doesn't pay to print at least some program guides for the fund raisers anymore. If you want people to listen to and pledge the fund drives, let them know what they are listening to and get them excited to tune in and listen. Perhaps WTJU already does this, but after the fund drives, see what shows made money and make sure there are shows playing that type of music, and again, let the listeners know. "Hey, if you are enjoying this show tune in every Tuesday ..."

greg wichelns | July 5, 2010 4:16 pm
some programming change at key times. WTJU should explore raining the general consciousness of the value of radio and what it can have to offer. I am an avid radio guy and I find that when I share that with people, they often reply " you know, I should listen more". I think people are jsut too inundated with all sorts of media. Radio can help them slow down. Teach the people how radio can enhavce their lives. Please don't fall in the same old trap of competing with all the other media. Seize the higher ground. I have to stop listening to WNRN because now adays they play the same music every morning. It didn't used to be that way. Too bad. There is so much music out there, what a shame to play the same stuff over and over.

Zack Perdue | July 5, 2010 3:58 pm
The personal touch, that comes from individuals playing music that they are passionate about, is very rare. With streaming audio, the potential audience is national/international. Use those lovely endorsements from the various musicians to reach beyond the C-ville/Albemarle County area.

Tina Eshleman | July 5, 2010 12:00 pm
The university should do a better job of promoting the station. The DJs at WTJU represent a wealth of knowledge about a wide range of music, and there are some interesting characters. Let people know about them -- who they are and when they're on the air, what shows they play. More and better Internet presence and use of podcasts and social media. Also -- is WTJU played at university offices?

Bob Williamson | July 5, 2010 10:59 am
My answer in the first box belonged here.

Jenny Wyss | July 5, 2010 8:58 am
See above More regular schedule blocks (same time of day every day) More opportunities to request music, and an obligation among volunteers to play requests I don't advocate mandated song/selection rotations as I believe this is a big reason listeners tune into WTJU. Can't we advertise this as a virtue of the station?

matthew kavanaugh | July 5, 2010 7:00 am
Play diverse music that is not found other places.

Anna Askounis | July 5, 2010 6:33 am
Instead of playing only what the volunteer d.j.s like to play, select, especially for classical music, that more "traditionally" beautiful classical music which has a broad audience appeal. I listen to the Va.Tech. classical station and donate to them. If WTJU played more of the music they play, I would donate to WTJU, my home station, as well.

Pete Marshall | July 4, 2010 6:45 pm
Increase the internet presence of wtju.....30 listeners max as at present is a mere token presence. Make the archive of past shows you already have on the secure part of the wtju site available to all, & make it available for streaming rather than download only...then people can listen to their favorite shows when it's convenient to them. Some djs already do this for individual shows, because the station is so far behind the curve. A side advantage of this is it will give the station hard numbers of listeners online, something that Arbitron does not give you. Also arrange for wtju to be listenable through iTunes...there are currently 161 college stations available through iTunes, WTJU should be on that list.

Brigitte&Goetz Hardtmann | July 4, 2010 5:20 pm
Inserting 5 minute (that's max) news casts every two hours throughout the day.

Charles Choi | July 4, 2010 2:30 pm
This question presumes that WTJU does not attract and keep listeners. The argument could be made that WTJU fares favorably in a competitive and low population density market relying only on terrestrial broadcast. WTJU needs to commit to moving its programming online, via the numerous ways digital distribution offers. Arguably the biggest win is the relaxation of time: program scheduling does not have to be a mutually exclusive decision for both the programmers and the listeners. Second is to keep up with audience behavior; people have flocked to online for their music discovery. WTJU needs to as well.

Randy May | July 4, 2010 12:57 pm
This station has a following of devout listeners in one or more genres. The problem is the size of this group. Were more people to actually know about tju's existence, the listener ship would grow as well. This is not a station that will sap listeners from other stations since it has a very high quality of programming as well as diversity of programming. For most of the populous those other stations in the area are safe,repetitive options they can count on so as not to have to think too much or in any way have to interpret a new music form or be asked to change gears in any way mentally. Most tastes are pretty narrow and the options those other stations offer give evidence to that. The listener ship you have are open, curious,intelligent and have a love for music in its many forms and genres. This group has a deeper music appreciation and that's why they're here.It should be obvious that if you were to simply reach more people,you would in turn find more real listeners. Changing programming is not going to attract many people from your competition. It will just loose a segment of your base. Greater community awareness will find more of what you have and what you want in terms of listeners and volunteers. You have a devoted group of listeners that's been here for a long time. You can look for more like minded music lovers, they are out there to be had. Again,Marketing!! Why is this so hard to see?

Jay Kardan | July 4, 2010 9:58 am
See above. WTJU should advertise itself to the community. Let people know about our wonderful programming. But don't change the programming!

Beth Hodsdon | July 4, 2010 9:42 am
The excellent ideas already in the feedback you've been given should increase listenership. Another point, though: if the station's aim is to be educational, it will not have the sort of mass appeal that larger, rock-oriented stations, or even larger public radio stations have. The latter are often "educational" in theory, but their homogenized playlists (Vivaldi's Four Seasons, and Pictures from an Exhibition, over and over) don't expose listeners to anything broadening musically. Instead, WTJU's mission can be to bring musical diversity and real depth to a smaller audience. This would not be incosistent with being more self-supporting if the fundraising campaigns are made more aggressive and professional.

Marva Barnett | July 4, 2010 8:18 am
Keep the electic mix of music. I will certainly stop listening (and donating) if you greatly reduce the classical music and/or jazz offerings. Especially now that WMRA has gone to all talk radio (they used to be my main radio station, but now I throw my NPR support to WVTF), I listen to WTJU most mornings for classical music. I also listen frequently to the mid-morning jazz and popular music programs. I donate to WTJU for the classical and jazz programming. Announce programming through The Hook, C'ville Weekly; let more people know about the intriguing sounds from WTJU!

Mary Anna Dunn | July 4, 2010 8:18 am
RESPECT US. Now you are asking us what we want, but you were about to impose a lot of changes without making the effort to find out what we wanted. Through this feedback: Identify what you do best, emphasize that. Identify what we needs improvement. Improve it. Identify what needs elimination. You cannot do that without first doing a through program evaluation and you should have done that earlier. Here is what I would emphasize, change, and eliminate. EMPHASIZE: Unique programing drawn from the knowledge and taste of superb DJs, not playlist. I like hearing things on WJTU I probably would not have heard elsewhere. WTJU introduced me to Darol Anger, Regina Carter, and Morwena Lasko. Thank you for that. I tune in for that kind of rare and beautiful music. Improve: Classical music is becoming extremely mainstream. It used to be as interesting as the jazz and folk programs, but now I rarely listen. Maybe the student involvement you are looking to increase could help with that. Eliminate Chatter. I tune out when the DJs are going on and on and on about the music they are about to play. On more than one occasion I have heard a DJ introduce a song for 15 minutes!!! I am not exaggerating.

Nancy Summers | July 3, 2010 3:46 pm
Everyone I know listens to the station, so it's hard for me to know who doesn't. I think that some self-promotion about the style of WTJU compared with other classical stations could be advertised and emphasized. I think the "handmade" quality of the station needs to be marketed as a plus.

Dave Rogers | July 3, 2010 12:43 pm
PROMOTE the station and its excellent variety more thoroughly with the assistance of the public affairs office. We need a promotional campaign that endorses and promotes the incredibly wonderful depth and breadth of our programming. New slogan that emphacizes the strengths of our variety and the experiences available. Expand the streaming! Use the web more aggressively for outreach and programming.

Elizabeth Benzinger | July 3, 2010 10:52 am
I personally think we should be continuing to do what we're already doing: bringing to the community the finest music of whatever genre we've chosen. On my show I regularly mention our other programming. Things like ads in other media, posters and schedules of programs in suitable places, the letters we send at fund-raising time probably help some. But, as I said above, I suspect the best advertising is word of mouth - hardly a day goes by that I don't tell someone, often someone new to the area, about WTJU.

Elizabeth | July 3, 2010 9:28 am
Fix basic things in the station that are broken-- get a nice 2nd chair instead of the squeaky one. Fix the old mac that's in the studio. Update the website. More support and training of new djs from management on basic broadcasting (e.g., no dead air, etc).

Liz Courain | July 3, 2010 9:06 am
I like the idea of dayparting. Once that has been accomplished the bands of music need to be advertised -- Drive with Jazz - Classical Lunchbox -- Folk at 5 or whatever... As long as there are mixed genres, it would be helpful to have "handles" to remind listeners what is happening when. Promote listening by streaming when advertising in Hook or C-ville.

Erik | July 3, 2010 8:56 am
I think there's an untapped potential listenership among those who cannot easily read if the station would introduce university lecture courses and reading aloud programs. I well remember a wonderful program on the Wisconsin state stations called "Chapter a Day." It was amazing how many good books could be presented in full that way over the course of a year.

Barclay Rives | July 3, 2010 8:36 am
Keep the same unique mix of programming by enthusiastic volunteer DJs

Don Stock | July 3, 2010 1:02 am
1. Advertise! Promote! I don't know anyone out here in the "real world" who is aware that WTJU even exists! Consider the sides of buses, McDonald's placemats (I wish I was kidding), booths at sporting events, a float in the Dogwood Parade, etc. 2. Change the slogan from "The Sound Choice..." to "University of Virginia Eclectic Radio". 3. Play an upbeat and engaging promo with appropriate music in the background for each phrase: "Classical in early morning and evening - Jazz in late morning and evening - Rock in the afternoon and at night - and all sorts of things on the weekend - University of Virginia Radio. Wtju.net. 91.1 FM. The Best of Everything".

Fletcher Stevens | July 3, 2010 12:12 am
Don't try to compete with commercial radio. Exploit your own niche ( Jazz, Folk, Americana, ect.). Air University activities.

Judith Thomas | July 2, 2010 11:31 pm
The station deserves a real marketing plan. It should be promoted on the UVa home page; the daily schedule should be linked to the UVA Arts page. The WTJU website is in desperate need of an upgrade - especially in terms of streaming! Web 2.0 features could easily be incorporated, allowing DJs and listeners to discuss the music. UVa is incredibly effective at marketing its brand; I can't help but think a little effort would go a long way with WTJU.

Willian Kestler | July 2, 2010 10:22 pm
More classical and jazz! It's ever more important since other public NPR/PRI stations - that have the most classical programming - are serving up more and more talk/yak and less music.

Deborah Murray | July 2, 2010 6:39 pm
First, enhanced promotion of the station. It still amazes me that WTJU is one of the best kept secrets in this community. Second, stronger signal.

Phyllis White | July 2, 2010 5:56 pm
The station has been woefully promoted. How can it be supported if people don't know about it? For instance the ad that's been in the Hook for a long time (barter for underwriting?) says absolutely nothing about the programming with plenty of space to do it. I've pointed it out to Chuck in the past and Burr more recently. EVERY WEEK, people could have been exposed to a few of the excellent programs provided. I've produced and promoted events since I was a teenager including concerts for WTJU and I know you have to be dogged and smart about promotion and WTJU hasn't had staff excelling in this area.

Judith Shatin | July 2, 2010 4:11 pm
Expand your classical music range to include more experimental music. Do more features on visiting musicians. Same for Rock -- more wide-ranging programming. Work with Cav Daily to have a feature each week on special upcoming music broadcasts; have a box on UVA top news for special features. Have a link to Arts Listings at UVA

Eric Wiland | July 2, 2010 3:32 pm
One word: internet. Podcasts, Archived shows, Archived live performances. Give the listener what she can't get elsewhere.

Lisa Reeder | July 2, 2010 2:49 pm
Play music that they enjoy. It seems there could be more 'urban' music included in the mix to appeal to younger listeners and to be more current on today's music.

Jeffrey Fisher | July 2, 2010 12:54 pm
Keep doing stuff that they can't get anywhere else. Have some character. Don't be generic. Given the ubiquity of iTunes and other Internet listening, it might make sense to promote in other large cities around the country, mainly with web advertising. That's off the top of my head. I have some experience in marketing, but I would need to think more about this. In principle, though, it seems to me that what you don't want is a brand that is indistinguishable from other brands. WTJU already has a lot of brand equity. Don't trade it in for milquetoast.

Mary Dykes | July 2, 2010 11:47 am
WTJU's strength is in community programming. I'm a classical music listener and value the non-network approach interspersed with local information.

Liz Rhodes | July 2, 2010 10:09 am
WTJU needs to work on Marketing and Sponsorship to building a stronger station with a better website, blog, better streaming, and podcasts. As someone who finds funds for a non-profit, my advice is GO OUT AND ASK FOR MONEY! Money will allow the station to move in a forward in technology - all of these things will increase and keep listeners.

Aaron Margosis | July 2, 2010 1:57 am
Increase visibility. E.g., co-sponsor events with other groups such as the Music Dept and make sure that WTJU91.1FM branding is visible. (How about advertising WTJU on WNRN?!) Promote individual programs more heavily (e.g., EVERYONE should know the name Prof. Bebop). Drop Demogoguery Now; Amy Goodman has the most grating voice on radio.

Jeff Roberts | July 2, 2010 1:36 am
You do have listeners, and many have been so for decades. They were attracted and have been kept. Did you want ask "How do we increase listenership?" Wet T-shirt contests; free trips to Daytona beach, and Atlantic City weekend packets for lottery winners would do this. Or did you want to further qualify the question with reference to your ostensible mission?

bob cassell | July 1, 2010 5:35 pm
Whatever you do, don't change. Another cookie cutter stamped out station is not what anybody needs. There is excess of such stations abound on the airwaves.

Gwen Loehr | July 1, 2010 12:16 pm
Devote more time to local news. You do a fantastic job getting local events covered. The diverse music speaks for itself.

Scott Cohen | July 1, 2010 11:49 am
Since when is listenership a measure of success for college radio? As an outcome, listener numbers is within the purview of commercial radio--not educational radio. The line seems to be blurred here.

Chris McRae | July 1, 2010 2:48 am
We've been told advertising is not a "silver bullet" for our problems, but we could do a whole lot more to get our names and shows out and about. We also used to publish a poster with the WTJU schedule. I used to live in group housing in the area, and the WTJU poster was always posted in the communal kitchen, where everyone could see it.

Michael Brooks | July 1, 2010 1:04 am
1) Barter advertising with area non-profits. Think out of the box… reach out to civic organizations, churches, synagogues, etc. 2) Plaster the town with bumper stickers. 3) Improve and promote your online stream. 4) Leverage social networking. 5) Make the website attractive and entertaining, not just informative. 6) Right smack in the header of every webpage it should state what is currently playing. Publishing a playlist in real-time should be mandatory for all programmers.

Kirsten Schofield | June 30, 2010 8:36 pm
Greater thought needs to be given to which program is placed where. When I had a daytime program, I consciously decided to play more accessible music that people listening midday might like; we should NOT be above taking a request and playing it gladly. We should take a look at the fund drive: which shows pulled in the most money? Play more of THAT. DJs should periodically do a fun theme or something like that to engage listeners; one show I really liked was the "Heaven and Hell" show. I listened way longer than I would have because I was curious which song would be next. People WANT to listen to the radio, but we have to be conscientious about engaging them.

Katherine Perdue | June 30, 2010 8:35 pm
One thing to do would be to let alumni know that they can listen to WTJU online. I found out from my dad who found out by driving through Charlottesville and hearing it on the radio. But I'm sure there are alumni who have fond memories of the station but aren't aware that they can listen to it. That would allow WTJU to keep listeners who move away after graduating. And as I mentioned above, telling students it exists would be a good start. Especially first year students who theoretically don't have cars and therefore probably don't have access to radio, but might well listen to local radio online if they knew they could.

James Ford | June 30, 2010 4:24 pm
Many of our volunteers have already begun the process of increasing our online presence through blogs, facebook, etc; if these efforts were given institutional support, such as integrating these efforts with the station's website, and continuing the efforts streamline our web broadcasts, it would greatly increase awareness of the station.

Terry Stegman | June 30, 2010 3:31 pm
Visuals around the area. I never SEE any signs/posters: "WTJU- (insert slogan here)"

Jane Foster | June 30, 2010 3:29 pm
Maybe you should have some ads or announcements in the local newspapers - I never do see anything about WTJU now that I think about it. Maybe there are lists of music lovers who attend concerts = Tuesday evening, Zephyrus, Orarorio, the Viginia Consort, etc.

Bill Davis | June 30, 2010 3:21 pm
TV and internet ads that deliver samples of the musical diversity heard on the station

Elizabeth Hull | June 30, 2010 2:52 pm
Give WTJU the marketing attention it deserves; promote the access to live internet listening on wtju.net outside the area. During the last fundraiser donors from Asia, Africa, and all over the United States were mentioned, and more can be done to reach outside the broadcast radius.

Janice Fischer | June 30, 2010 2:03 pm
Publicity. I found out about the station 20 years ago by pure chance and was delighted to find vocal music, opera, early music, and chamber music. However, many of my friends did not know about the station. Admittedly the location in Nelson County can be a problem but it's not insurmountable.

Walt Rodney | June 30, 2010 1:34 pm
I don't know if there is really a problem with the numbers of listeners. Arbitron is notoriously problematic, so throwing around those numbers to argue for specific changes makes the "professionals" look silly. TJU bumper stickers used to be a common sight. I rarely see them now. But they're a sort of "self-branding."

Claire Kaplan | June 30, 2010 1:03 pm
Air live concerts, when possible--for example, the University Symphony. Also, more in-studio performances.

Gary Westmoreland | June 30, 2010 12:09 pm
If it can be handled efficiently and cost effectively, I wish WTJU could broadcast special events and concerts during the year. This could involve community volunteers and students on an event basis.

Byron Robitaille | June 30, 2010 12:00 pm
wouldn't it be exciting to have a station where you could count on being surprised by the music, the programming wasn't two hours of this followed by two hours of that followed by two hours of something completely unlistenable. A lot of people have a wide range of musical tastes, and I'm sure a lot of dj's do as well- let 'em mix country with classical in the same show! or have teams of dj's with different expertise on the same show- do something surprising- and make it seem like the dj's are having fun and trying to communicate with the audience and each other, and not just showing up for their umpteenth show with the same tired theme after 20 years of being a volunteer dj. my hunch is that day parting won't be much help- you'll just be changing one tiny audience for another tiny audience. I am so glad I'm not Burr, Carol osr Marion, with the responsibility of trying to glean some useful information from our community input. The only positive note is that so few of us have put in our 2 cents worth, though I realize the forum is young. It makes my head hurt to read some of these ideas (partner with a station in a developing country!) Confuses me when I read "you can hardly hear it in your car" (I hear it all over albemarle and as far north as culpeper) and collapses me when I read "pay the music directors a nominal salary". Good luck OPA and Burr- you're gonna need it

Patricia Price | June 30, 2010 11:45 am
I believe the primary reason that WTJU’s listenership has declined is a total lack of marketing. It seems wishful thinking to stress underwriting, since the station already has a staff position totally dedicated to underwriting. It might be more appropriate to transform that position into a marketing position—perhaps with a marketing budget?

Lester H. Fink | June 30, 2010 11:12 am
Listeners are attracted by what they like, and kept by not loosing what they like! If you must make changes, remember that some listeners will be lost by what attracts others. I moved to VA 14 years ago, have been listening to your classical programs ever since, and have responded to your fund drives religiously. For me, less classical - less support; no classical, no support.

Shana Goldin-Perschbacher | June 30, 2010 10:12 am
I think you have dedicated listeners. I moved away two years ago and I would listen more often, but I have had some trouble with the Ogg Vorbis streaming. (I try to catch Nick Rubin's shows when he announces on Facebook that he's about to go on. Maybe more Facebook announcements would help!) Now that I live far away, I miss the station a lot! It's so unique and wonderful! I REALLY hope that you will not change your mode of operation to try to fit in with how most radio stations work these days. Your listeners LIKE that you don't cycle through the same songs every hour. People ENJOY being surprised by what they might hear. The DJ's are fun and funny, and we love that they are local people who sometimes make mistakes or run out of things to say. It's part of the appeal of a local station!

Bill Tetzeli | June 30, 2010 10:05 am
I'm withdrawing my support of any album rotation, whether it's controlled by the DJ's or not. In 2004 we came just shy of the 18,000 listeners Burr wants and have gone nearly as high a few other times. We didn't need no stinkin' album rotation then and we don't need it now. As far as getting goodies from record companies when they see us reporting their albums to the charts, the whole point of that is to create listenership. If we can manage (as we have in the past) to create that listenership through other means, that obviates the need for rotations. I still believe there should be ways both online and in real time that listeners and DJ's can challenge each other to expand their musical tastes and programming. But anything compulsory in the programming, no matter how mildly so, is completely unnecessary

mary jo ayers | June 30, 2010 7:17 am
For me and many other listeners in the Charlottesville community an increase in the classical and jazz programing would bring in more listeners. Perhaps a more formal news and weather break in the morning would be good.

Rick Mangione | June 30, 2010 2:16 am
implementing the first two suggestions without changing other aspects or the mission of the station

Jim Jones | June 29, 2010 11:13 pm
Send out the signal further. I can listen on my computer every night but I can't get on the radio everywhere. That would be nice. I could listen in the office all day long.

Leni Sorensen | June 29, 2010 9:44 pm
Is there a way to have the announcements acknowledge the wider C'ville/Albemarle County listenership - Most of us are not students or alumni - we just like the radio station - we don't care much about UVA itself.

Melissa | June 29, 2010 9:40 pm
Having blocked programming, not putting an organ specialist on at 7am on a weekday, which is prime drive time. Sunday is for organs. At certain times of day in Charlottesville there are four stations simultaneously playing classical music. Put a sign on the station. A big one, so that people know it exists. Have departments other than rock host outside events, dance parties, screenings, concerts, lectures, even...

Richard Leahy | June 29, 2010 9:38 pm
Get rid of 20-year old station promos!

Laura | June 29, 2010 8:57 pm
I think increasing your presence in the community will help by leaps and bounds! I also like the idea of tju being piped into the dining halls, and sports events, etc.

Cafe Lady | June 29, 2010 8:54 pm
PLAN - PLAN NOW - and leave it alone. Measure twice, cut once. If you're going to make some alterations to the format, do it, and let the listeners get used to it. Keep the communication (a forum) open so that listeners can communicate with WTJU. No one is going to like everything, but don't do things piecemeal. Listen to the listeners, plan accordingly, and then put the plan into action.

Joyce Dudek | June 29, 2010 7:56 pm
advertising, events, predictable schedule. Keep classical music, if only 6AM - 10AM. No talk radio. There is plenty of that already. No morning dual personalities. I do not want to hear yacking in the morning, just music please.

Laura Leavitt | June 29, 2010 5:26 pm
sponsor and llive broadcast more live music events

Joy Rayman | June 29, 2010 5:07 pm
perhaps holding more fundraising events at local venues with a variety of local artists. Advertise that WTJU plays music for true music lovers who are sick and tired of the mainstream crap that other local stations play.

Elizabeth Brickhouse | June 29, 2010 4:48 pm
Get the point across to students that listening to WTJU's unique blend of musical genres and very diverse DJs is an excellent way for them to discover music they just love and didn't even know existed!

Jennifer | June 29, 2010 3:59 pm
Improve the website to make it more inviting. Add more opportunities for interaction with DJs (blogs, chats, Facebook pages, webcam).

Marla Muntner | June 29, 2010 3:07 pm
keep playing dj-selected music, perhaps broadening genres covered include alternative news sources, such as Pacifica radio

David Soyka | June 29, 2010 1:57 pm
Publicize its existence. Ads in local papers. Sponsor community events. Put up WTJU posters of upcoming shows/events in local coffehouses/pizzerias (ever look at the wall in Christian's Pizza?) Develop email lists to send listeners program updates and local musical news of interest (possible position for student interns, business majors may be interested). Keep diverse programming, publicize this is the only place to get a unique menu of jazz, classical, rock and folk.

Mark Hineline | June 29, 2010 1:15 pm
Fund Drives at WTJU have always been things to look forward too instead of dread, due to the special programming and enthusiasm of the DJ's for the particular style or artist. Expanding Fund Drive programming to include public events or performances could attract listeners. WTJU cannot and should not expect to compete for listeners with mainstream radio- it has survived and flourished for 50 years without doing so. WTJU should strive to develop and keep an admittedly smaller, but highly devoted and regular audience- those who want nothing but mainstream rock can find that on any number of stations or other sources- WTJU will best be served by enhancing what makes it unique and different. Attempting to compete with WNRN or WWWV, etc is a path to mediocrity and failure.

Joey Conover | June 29, 2010 12:23 pm
Attracting: Marathons are great, psa recordings from cool musicians - update; cool stickers/gear Keeping: Keep ads off; keep personalities relaxed and real; music you cannot hear anywhere else

Adam | June 29, 2010 11:46 am
Block scheduling M-F, so listeners will know what genre to expect each day. The way things are currently, there is no continuity in the afternoon/evening. Despite what some folks have written, you should not expect folks to have to run to an on-line schedule to know what is coming up at noon on a Tuesday. As it now stands the noon time M-F schedule is soul Monday, folk Tuesday, world Wednesday, folk Thursday, and rock Friday. Ridiculous... In term on non-programming ways, use the Internet, and all that is available on it, for your benefit. The same can be said of print media. Co-sponsoring concerts, both UVa and elsewhere, is a great way to spread the word. Don't let NRN and the Corner sponsor concerts that are our bread and butter. Once the listeners are there, improve the on-air sound. Too many people in certain departments mumble, or are simply incoherent. There is some great music played on a number of shows, where the announcer drives me to turn off the station. Interact with your listeners, and make them feel as though they are part of the program. On-air giveaways are a small part of that equation, although there should be more of those as well.

Greg Raymond | June 29, 2010 11:10 am
Advertise

Nicole Radshaw | June 29, 2010 8:28 am
Continue to focus on students but don't forget about the community. It doesn't have to be just central Virginia. Reach out to alumni all over the globe.

Tes Slominski | June 29, 2010 12:33 am
First: do NOT try to compete with WNRN at its own game. Instead, strengthen WTJU where WNRN is weakest--or, more to the point, offer programming that presents alternatives. I think the current schedule is fairly well balanced in that folk shows rarely compete with Anne Williams, and the classical & jazz shows mostly only compete with NPR affiliates (I think?). So that leaves rock, which of course is the tricky genre. But it strikes me that there are an ever-increasing number of good C-ville rock bands, and I rarely hear live rock on WNRN. That's a niche WTJU could fill.

Michelle Vermillion | June 28, 2010 10:46 pm
WTJU needs to increase its visibility in Charlottesville. A step in that direction should involve allocation of funds for advertising/promotion in the Charlottesville area, so members of the community know what WTJU has to offer. If I hadn't been raised on a steady diet of public broadcasting, I probably wouldn't even know WTJU existed. I sought it out when I moved here, but that's because of my background. *I* came to WTJU more than WTJU came to me. An updated Web site and podcasting subscription would also be a forward move. (I assume podcasting subscription is unavailable as I've never been able to locate this option on WTJU's Web site.)

Kristin Szakos | June 28, 2010 10:00 pm
Text messages to listeners about when a show with the kind of music they like is on... I think the best ambassadors for listenership are folks who participate - DJ's, performers, volunteers, etc. I get Sandy Snyder's e-mails and Facebook info about her show almost every week, and it reminds me to listen. I love that WTJU has stuff I can't hear anywhere else. As a news junkie, I listen often to Radio IQ, but when I change the station it's only to WTJU, because it's not the national pap all the other stations have.

Pam Roland | June 28, 2010 9:45 pm
I'd say, keep doing what you are doing, unless you know you are losing listeners.

Daniel Ehnbom | June 28, 2010 9:03 pm
Keep doing what you are doing.

Neil Means | June 28, 2010 8:02 pm
Advertise, market, promote. Most people are not aware of WTJU. Figure out how to boost the internet presence.

Starrie Williamson | June 28, 2010 4:00 pm
Improve the programming, and rotate shows more often. There are too many shows that have been around too long that aren't attractive to younger listeners.

Bill Maisannes | June 28, 2010 1:21 pm
Turn the current controversies into a reason to listen to the station. "You've heard the arguments, now listen to what all the fuss is about."

Aaron Bailey | June 28, 2010 12:25 pm
Expand rock hours. The mid-afternoon hours are great and reflect a rich Cville/UVA history of talent and brilliant DJs and musicians. The later hours allow great home listening. We need both!! Direct interaction with the community could use a bit of improvement. Start by making a more official presence at high and low profile shows (rock, jazz, folk, whatever).

Vic Szabo | June 28, 2010 11:39 am
--Advertise what WTJU has to offer that other stations don't -- music that isn't diluted through an appeal to the lowest common denominator, programming that doesn't repeat the same songs over, and over, and over.... --Make archived shows available to the public on the station website. --Involvement in major community events. --More student involvement; after all, students make up almost half the town population most of the year. --Compress audio so that it attracts listeners browsing through stations while driving. It's a lot easier to dismiss WTJU when you can barely hear it in your car.

Art Thomas | June 28, 2010 9:25 am
One of the things that makes WTJU delightfully unique for me are the volunteer DJ's and their complete autonomy in selecting music. Is it too much to suggest that it is this autonomy that accounts for the high caliber of DJ's and thus the music they play? I'm wondering if listenership could increase by devoting, in some way or ways,a portion of each show to listener requests. Would DJ's be willing to share this power with listeners?

Nikki E | June 27, 2010 9:36 pm
More coomunity presence at local musice events like Fridays After Five, the Crozet Music Festival and maybe some musical benefit concerts. Most people who aren't affiliated with UVA know nothing about the station. Keep the focus on alternative radio for people who are sick of repetition and obnoxious djs.

Marcia Day Childress | June 27, 2010 8:27 pm
Get more students more involved in working at the station--indeed, put station management in their hands as, say, the University of Montana's radio station is, with lots of volunteers and a couple of paid student staffers. The students and their friends will expand listenership.

Thomas Pease | June 27, 2010 6:10 pm
Better training of on-air hosts, to make them sound better. Tighter breaks. The repertoire (music), esp. classical, is what makes WTJU different from WVTF.

Sandy Snyder | June 27, 2010 5:40 pm
The programming will keep them there. To attract them, advertise!! Ads on the WTJU facebook page (which I set up) have been incredibly effective at increasing the visibility of the station. The ad banner that I wrote has been seen almost one million times and cost less than $200 total (for ads run 3 different times for a total of about 20 days).

Anne Becker | June 27, 2010 3:39 pm
Get the word out. I'm astonished that the 30-somethings in my office are clueless about the radio station's existence let alone what it has to offer. WTJU really IS the sound choice in CVA but maybe it is time for a new slogan. Something that offers a little more info (WVTF has "classical, jazz, NPR" which about covers it). With apologies in advance for the lameness of this, how about "passion, expertise, and spontaneity across genres". How about drawing attention to the "block" nature of the programming, as in the folk block on Sat AM, then later the wonderful transition from afternoon rock to bent-rock, then world, then universal (living time), then back home to the USA...the depth of the station's personality is manifest not only in the mix of tunes in a given show, but in the flow of the day/night programming continuum as well. The evident respect the DJs have for each other's musical expertise knits the genres together.

Jay hertel | June 27, 2010 1:59 pm
Creating a block programming schedule is essential to increasing listenership. Some long time listeners may be upset at first about scheduling changes, but we need to give keep in mind that they are intelligent music lovers who will be able to figure out the new schedule. We also need to keep the programming of shows as independent as possible. This is our calling card and the reason why music "seekers" tune into WTJU.

Zoe | June 27, 2010 2:23 pm
Others have suggested more consistency and polling of listeners. I agree. WTJU now has to compete with WNRN, The Corner, Radio IQ, Pandora, digital radio, and iPods. However, mainstreaming will NOT increase listenership: that niche has been filled. WTJU needs to retain its unique qualities, among which is its LACK of boring repetition. Put more effort into getting the word out! The potential listeners are there.

Elizabeth Stark | June 27, 2010 11:46 am
-Rock during the day (This is how I first heard the station as a 1st year student). Why not jazz, classical or folk at night? It is really difficult for rock to schedule all its DJs so late at night. -Keep free form model. Possibly require x number of volunteer hours each week. This would get DJs into the station, and encourage better show prep. -More DJ training. Better on-air announcing. -More community events. Possibly a yearly fundraiser at the Pavilion? This would involve community, be a great fundraiser, and generate a listener and donor base.

Mark Quigg | June 26, 2010 7:19 pm
I am a consumer of your radio services, not a provider. You can keep original programming that is distinct from the offerings of standard commercial and standard NPR radio. The individual expertise and passion of your volunteer DJs is the greatest strength. Play to the strength.

Khristina VanHall | June 26, 2010 6:58 pm
First of all DONT SOUND LIKE EVERYONE ELSE! I am terrified you guys will change with more "rock" and sound just like every other repetitive station in this town. I ENJOY the variety, however a few comments. Move classical to earlier in the day, mornings perhaps, folk, rock and jazz in the after noon.

Anthony Gallo | June 25, 2010 10:31 am
First off, people need to know that the station exists - see above for ways to reach out. I agree that there needs to be more consistency in day-to-day programming. The biggest part of this should be consistent hours for programming instead of the current helter-skelter programming. I support a light rotation for "non-specialty" shows; however, there should be a set time for specialty shows each day, and, unfortunately, not every DJ can have a "specialty" show. This rotation should focus on ALBUMS not SONGS; specific albums should not be dictated for each show, but rather the DJ should be asked to choose from a collection of "focus" albums for the week (10? 20? the "new bin"?). For the rock department at least, this could mean mandating that a non-specialty DJ simply has to play 4 songs an hour from a collection of focus albums. Rules should be implemented for announcing so that the listener is aware of what is going on. No more than 4 songs should be played at a time without announcing. The DJ should be required to back announce what has been played and encouraged to announce what could be coming in the future.

Geof Carter | June 25, 2010 6:59 am
See above. Live blog during music programs, by which DJ and listeners can connect. (Idea borrowed from WFMU.)

Kirsten Miles | June 25, 2010 6:51 am
I think some movement towards consistency could be helpful, but any path the station takes needs to be creatively marketed. A good marketing strategy can smooth over many unusual and innovative station formats, and the creativity of college radio stations is a part of station identities. It might be challenging, but thoughtful management can retain a balance of creativity and consistency, and convey that to audiences in a sustainable fashion.

Jordan Taylor | June 25, 2010 2:39 am
Better, one-click streaming of the station. THe web presence has been improved but we need one-click access and ARCHIVED SHOWS so people can time shift their favorite shows. I love Black Circle Revolution, Radio Wowsville and Madame Psychosis but I always have to time-shift them from the Tape Vault.

Andrew Pratt | June 24, 2010 10:32 pm
Nothing can substitute for a coherent and well-organized selection of music and a commensurate quality presentation of the selected music. "If you build it, they will come..." This does *not* mean that there should be play lists dictated from on high; new announcers, or those who need a refresher in playlist selection and organization, could consult with a mentor or colleague to fine-tune their music lists. A more vigorous promotion of shows from ALL FOUR departments is essential. I have been extremely discouraged by the short shrift the Classical department has gotten in this whole reorganization. We are not wallpaper, and there is still a significant audience that will tune in to hear *quality* Classical programming (as on WTJU), in contrast to the monotonous, repetitive play lists of every other station that presents Classical music (much of it canned and shipped in from Minnesota).

Stuart Gilchrist | June 24, 2010 6:23 pm
Teach the subject. If you want to be on air you got to be able to perform. If you give your audience a good show they will listen and stay.

steve vargo | June 24, 2010 6:01 pm
keep on offering the wonderful variety of music and news offered by the station - definitely would not like to see the station go in a 'mainstream' direction. there is plenty of that already available.

Jessie Abbate | June 24, 2010 5:45 pm
How about using this very poll to put more rock, jazz, folK (i'm actually torn between what i listen to more) - and reduce the play time for classical/opera during popular times for listening? Ask what we like more often. And then respond to it. And tell us that the station might actually go under if we don't donate at least a week's beer money.

David Lee | June 24, 2010 4:51 pm
Invite regular input from listeners on some medium like this, and be sure to get feedback and results to them. Sponsor more music events.

U.Va. employee and music fan | June 24, 2010 4:38 pm
More rock during normal hours. Definitely no mandated repeating of songs. WTJU could do on-grounds events to draw attention.

Zachary Wheat | June 24, 2010 4:35 pm
I feel that without more consistency in day-to-day programming, the audience will largely be limited to "true believers" who are into very eclectic music, and the notion of free-form community radio. Our present approach probably makes it tough to attract and keep new listeners.

What kinds of community partnerships should WTJU involve itself in to reach more people?

Nick | July 23, 2010 5:36 pm
is the station allowed to trade underwriting for airplay in businesses (like restaurants, cafes, bars, etc)? or for poster/flyer space?

Scott Pettis | July 23, 2010 11:57 am
On site broadcasts at local events (see above).

Daniel J Holm | July 21, 2010 7:27 pm
Live music venues and festivals.

Philip Stafford | July 21, 2010 3:54 pm
Cross promotion or partnerships with the many music forums in town would be helpful. The WTJU Music Calendars already provide free advertising to many of these venues. I don't think it would be asking too much for some of these venues to put the WTJU logo on some of there printed material, or perhaps giving a "thank you" to WTJU during performances.

Brian Keena | July 20, 2010 10:52 pm
Any and all local concerts should have some WTJU presence. "Live at the Prism" was a great series...why not consider remote feeds. LOCAL community/public information programming.

bob bradley | July 20, 2010 12:58 pm
throw a wide net across the public/private partnership landscape. j

James Shelton | July 19, 2010 11:30 pm
Non profit groups only. Community organizations. Non religious charities that help people. Music groups such ad jazz and classical boards. Non profit member supported media such as Democracy Now!

Tim Ballo | July 17, 2010 9:00 pm
Sponsoring more music performances is one possibility.

Brian Rakita | July 17, 2010 6:10 pm
live broadcasts of local cool music would be nice

Nancy Deutsch | July 16, 2010 3:57 pm
events and venues that reach music lovers - e.g., venues such as The Southern and the Jefferson, events such as Fridays After Five, the Live Arts Gala, Planned Parenthood's 80s prom - events that attract young, active people who enjoy music (even the events are run by other non-profits who are fund-raising)

Peter Tschirhart | July 15, 2010 10:28 pm
Try and partner with some professional news and entertainment companies in Charlottesville. Get them to include WTJU workers/volunteers/DJs when relevant opportunity comes up. Say, have WTJU organize special Friday After Five broadcasts on the mall, have them appear on TV as special 18-25 media commentators, etc.

Thatcher Stone | July 15, 2010 9:09 am
alumni professors (love the classical) big brothers big sisters - nobody hates a child

eve schwartz | July 15, 2010 8:54 am
Look to some of the venues for live music: the Southern, the Jefferson, the Paramount, the Pavillion. TJU already does PSA's for their shows. Ask them to hang banners, run an ad in their programs (you already give them free advetising).

Valerie L'Herrou | July 14, 2010 7:25 pm
THE MUSIC RESOURCE CENTER!! the kids should also have access to the educational experience that is WTJU... and they will bring more diversity as to age, race, and socio-economic status. --there can also be highschool internships --Partnerships with university/community public affairs organizations--the women's center, the Miller center, Center for Politics, Foundation for Humanities, Rivanna Conservation Society, Lewis and Clark Exploratory Center, Local Food Hub, Virginia Organizing Project--they can all produce the kinds of 5-min public-affairs programs for free--PLUS bring their constituencies into our listenership.

Tom Tartaglino | July 14, 2010 8:13 am
I like that you are about the music. Partner with like people.

MW | July 13, 2010 10:49 pm
Advertising for Underwriting trades with the Paramount Theater, Oratorio Society, Chamber Music Festival, Charlottesville University Symphony Orchestra, etc. Listen and Learn programs with the City, County and Private Schools.

Ginny Chilton | July 13, 2010 8:39 pm
Can TJU go on the road? Broadcast live from a community event. You can either broadcast a live music performance, or interrupt a normal TJU program to give periodic updates live from a community event-- an AIDS walk, the Charlottesville film festival, etc. People there will see the TJU equipment and banners, and your presence will likely be encouraged by event staff, since you're promoting their event for free.

Patsy Goolsby | July 13, 2010 3:42 pm
Frequently publish the schedule in the Hook and the C'ville.

Don Harrison | July 12, 2010 11:58 pm
Whatever's going. But we should hook up with organizations like the Virginia Foundation for the Humanities and Blue Ridge Institute at Ferrum College to co-produce shows and events that highlight Virginia music history. The VFH and BRI have folk festivals every year- how about some live broadcasts?

Werner K. Sensbach | July 12, 2010 11:42 pm
Team up with Richmond classical stations like the Seminary station which has excellent high quality programming but unfortunately has a weak signal in Ch'ville or try to team up with NPR. There is strength in numbers!!

Susan C Scott | July 12, 2010 10:34 pm
Advertise the experience of working there as useful experience for jobs as well as a great volunteer opportunity. See if the hours of volunteering could be used as credit hours in the Music or Communications departments. Get the schedule into the Daily Progress.

Linn Harrison | July 12, 2010 6:00 pm
Not sure on this one.

Toni Barskile | July 12, 2010 3:59 pm
I don't know. Maybe outreach for local interns? Work w/Upward Bound in the summer to run a broadcasting course for high school students?

Beth Burnam | July 12, 2010 3:25 pm
Advertise in libraries, not only in Charlottesville but in rural areas where there's not a whole lot of choice for great music you don't own or know about. Have an internship program to boost radio innovation among college students--it doesn't need to involve pay if it's advertised creatively.

Sharon Defibaugh | July 12, 2010 2:37 pm
Have a community concert, with various types of music, held to raise money and get publicity for this great local resource.

Keith Alnwick | July 12, 2010 2:31 pm
The question is how can you get listeners to feel a sense of ownership? How can you get them off commercial radio, whether country, rock, latin, etc. and feel as invested as the students / music aficionados / local DJ's are. Forge connections with other similar / iconic / multiformat independent stations around the county - WMMT / Appalshop (KY), WFMU (NY), KBOO (Portland, OR).

Michael Holroyd | July 12, 2010 1:48 pm
No ideas.

Peter Hedlund | July 12, 2010 12:22 pm
Sponsor some sort of Local Food/Local Music event in C'ville.

Lynn Hedlund | July 12, 2010 12:02 pm
I think that advertising regularly in both the C'ville and Hook would reach a large portion of the community.

Dennis DaLuiso | July 12, 2010 11:51 am
TJU used to promote more live shows and had a signage presence in local venues. The station could promote shows in a manner more formalized than by depending on DJ's to do individual promotion on their shows. Open up the process more.

Carol chandross | July 12, 2010 11:17 am
Read the articles written by students and staff and townfolk. There are lots of suggestions. I was amazed at the response.

kate nesbitt | July 12, 2010 10:39 am
If Va TEch can afford 2 radio stations carrying NPR, etc. why can't UVA carry one good one?

Carla Arton | July 12, 2010 7:41 am
Library of Congress Recorded Sound Section in Culpeper. Curator is Matt Barton, mbarton@loc.gov. Have booths set up at the local events, summer festivals.

Joan Fenton | July 12, 2010 6:53 am
Have a sales force that solicits ads. Do PSA's that tell listeners how they can become sponsors. Let the business community know that WTJU will partner with them on events

Susanna Spencer | July 11, 2010 11:42 pm
no comment, but think lots of good ideas in others' comments.

Peter Henderson | July 11, 2010 6:58 pm
The Music Dept and other departments which discuss music as part of their curricula. Also performing groups in the community, both student and non-student. I would stay away from anything that compromises the integrity of the station. If fund-raising is down that is because it is down everywhere thanks to the economy. My own contributions are down, not because I love the station less but because I am strapped. If I ever get rich the first thing I'm going to do is write a fat check to WTJU in appreciation for the many nights they have brought me good music, good company, and good cheer.

Henry Wiencek | July 11, 2010 5:48 pm
Don't know.

Phyllis Binder | July 11, 2010 12:49 pm
Musical events, as has been done in the past, but perhaps to a greater degree. There are so many musical events in Charlottesville that this probably could be done more than it is now. Possibly partnership with a music venue in some form such as was done with the Prism Coffeehouse.

Steve Guion | July 11, 2010 9:56 am
Every possible one.

Aaron Zatcoff | July 10, 2010 4:20 pm
We should partner with other musical venues and providers to promote their concerts, offer tickets and comps to the deejays... have deejays interview performers who come through town. We need to reach out to schools, the discovery museum, and other music teachers/schools etc to attract those who want to love music. We present musical diversity at its best, but our deejays are mostly white. We should reach out to peoples of color and other ethnic groups and organzations, some of which is already being done (like Bruce on Radio Tropicale).

Prue Thorner | July 10, 2010 2:17 pm
Charlottesville Symphony Orchestra, University Jazz Band, Zephyrus and other choral groups, Black Voices, Virginia Consort.

Tim Beeghly | July 10, 2010 1:31 pm
Again, we need to market the station! We currently do marketing. We can join forces with a non-profit and help them with their own annual fundraising event. We have a huge cadre of volunteers that are ready, willing and very able to help in the community.

kathy kuhlmann | July 10, 2010 10:55 am
wtju is a fantastic radio station. we all get credit for listening as you learn so much about music, performers, venues. i listen to one program on wnrn and a couple on the public radio station. any other time my radio is on it is on tju.

Ruth Cross | July 10, 2010 10:48 am
Folk-dancecallendar, public service announcements of local musical offerings, etc. You know how. Just because the listnership for classical is smaller than for current pop, don't dismiss it. Classically inspired listeners are worth big bucks! are loyal.

Dan Goldberg | July 10, 2010 10:18 am
WTJU may have to do more "marketing" at public off grounds events. Booths at festivals and the like. Though I do not know if that is valuable and I certainly do not think wasting volunteer time is a positive step.

Jace Goodling | July 10, 2010 7:55 am
co-op with PVCC, underwrite local volunteer events

Mark Greenfield | July 9, 2010 8:11 pm
Be involved with all of the great local bands. Help them help you.

Guinevere Higgins | July 9, 2010 1:22 pm
Partner with the Music Resource Center, BRIMS, UVA music dept, other non-profit music organizations. Make TJU available for live concerts/broadcasting. Reach out to high school students, especially if they have aspirations to attend UVA.

A. Soroka | July 9, 2010 1:15 pm
Other arts organizations in Charlottesville are the natural partners for WTJU. Documentary programs on art produced with local galleries, hip-hop broadcasts from the Music Resource Center, live broadcasts of the Charlottesville-University Symphony, full-length natural history documentaries produced with local park services, gardening programs produced with the Piedmont Master Gardeners... the possibilities are endless. WTJU should be an attractive outlet for these organizations, far beyond underwriting and PSAs.

Michael Sokolowski | July 8, 2010 7:00 pm
Schools, musicians, patrons of the arts, people sponsoring musical events, teachers of music, local recording studios, music stores. Find the power people in every genre and get them excited about community radio. They'll help you network from there. Spotlight local talent and the talent that comes through town (you already do this, so keep it up and figure out ways to do it better).

David J. Simpson | July 8, 2010 5:41 pm
Continue allowing presenters to choose their own music, and encourage listener requests and suggestions for inclusion in future programs.

Mary Ann | July 8, 2010 3:28 pm
- Partnerships that lend themselves to programming opportunities. For example, partnering with local wineries and wine sellers for a series on wine that educates the listener and highlights specific wines on each program, along with suggested menus and music. Local wine sellers can then features those wines at a store display that provides menu cards/recipies/serving suggestions and music lists, as well as a listing of future programs and reference to the Web site where past programs are available for listening, and menus, etc., are available for downloading or printing. - Partner with local high schools to present their student music concerts, and archive on the Web site (along with the names of the performers) so friends and family, local and out of town, can listen whenever they like. (This also provides additional funding opportunities from parents, grandparents, both local and out of town.)

Ron Povich | July 8, 2010 2:19 pm
WTJU could expand it's connections to local businesses who are likely to remain or become underwriters, as well as to community organizations and agencies who could be served by our PSA capabilities.

Karen O'Brien | July 8, 2010 2:12 pm
Sponsor more live music in town and do live broadcasts - you all used to do that with the Prism and it was great. You've had local people reading their essays and commentary - do more of that perhaps. Or pose a question and inspire responses - e.g. a debate on the value of local radio versus canned centrally generated playlists.... ;)

Marietta McCarty | July 8, 2010 11:49 am
Doesn't U.Va. already have many community parterships in place that can be used? Some of my students at PVCC have hosted great shows and then gone on to major in music at the University.

Cyndy Williams | July 8, 2010 9:16 am
Maybe some community service getting them involved with the station. Go out & play at local businesses like some of the other stations do, maybe around the holidays & take up donations of food or items that families need.

Colin Campbell | July 7, 2010 10:14 pm
Presence at public events, namely concerts. Live remote broadcasts to reach out.

Valerie Matthews | July 7, 2010 8:12 pm
As above and the wonderful volunteers should speak out more.

William Shoup | July 7, 2010 6:32 pm
What is this MORE PEOPLE crap? Why not do some more live broadcasts like you did from the Prism. I have been astonished at some of the great music unexpectedly pouring forth from the Prism. The international shows, the eclectic shows, opera, pipe organ etc etc, where the heck are you going to get that sort of exposure from another rock station? Let`s face it WTJU provides exposure to stuff we don`t normally encounter. Are we poorer for the experience?

ned oldham | July 7, 2010 5:09 pm
arts organizations like LiveArts, Lighthouse, Bridge PAI--these are rich with individuals who have the knowledge to help create creative programs for wtju. How about the Virginia Folklife Center, who could be helpful in providing quality recordings and even in obtaining grants for folk programming.

Josh Krahn | July 7, 2010 4:36 pm
None. Don't focus on the "community" thing. That is a natural byproduct of the broadcast medium. Focus on the educational mandate of Uva. That is what gives WTJU the freedom to be unconventional and surprising, which, in turn, has made the station a jewel of the University. Don't ruin this by trying to please a broader swath of the public. Take the role of a curator. Be an art gallery of music. Get grants and endowments. Reach out to wealthy alumni. Reach out to patrons of the arts.

Margaret Lee | July 7, 2010 3:22 pm
Have pledge drives with local sponsors and donors providing prizes.

Peter Welch | July 7, 2010 3:17 pm
More live broadcasts in all genres. The live broadcasts from The Prism were great. Increase WTJU's presence at student events, local concerts, dances, etc. Have more WTJU fundraising concerts, dances, etc. Bring WTJU simulcasts back to the local cable access channel when they are not showing any programming. I actually had people tell me they heard my show on the TV.

Mike | July 7, 2010 1:58 pm
Work with music and arts groups. Work with other public broadcasters to not duplicate coverage

Cindy Benton-Groner | July 7, 2010 1:49 pm
Tap into Semester at Sea staff for increasing international coverage - news and music. You could have weekly five minute clips from the current voyage. In the past WTJU used to sponsor concerts. This should be revived.

Bob Girard | July 7, 2010 12:52 pm
Guest programmers. Facebook involvement. Live events. Sponsoring events. Getting students first year to participate. But don't dilute the programming. Learn from the different examples of Circuit City and Crutchfield to help determine the best course. And try to remember that there was once a station called WUVA.

Erika Herz | July 7, 2010 12:20 pm
Do live programming from various stages like C'ville Coffee and interviews with attendees enjoying the music.

Bridge Cox | July 7, 2010 11:10 am
There are plenty of community organizations and businesses that would love to be aligned with WTJU, it's just a matter of how we price that commitment and what we can do with it.

Marsha Burger | July 7, 2010 10:14 am
Friday's after Five annual chamber music weekend

Peter Brunjes | July 7, 2010 8:49 am
I think it has done well here since most of the community music groups seem to have links to the station

Rusty Trainham | July 7, 2010 12:26 am
Community outreach should include co-sponsorship with local businesses, other UVa departments, oither media, etc. This should include concert sponsorships, collaborations with local night clubs, special programs, such as a French festival, Italian festival, Japanese festival, Black History, etc. Advertising in other media also helps, i.e., student newspaper, community newspaper, local television, other radio stations.

Becky Calvert | July 6, 2010 6:53 pm
More concerts. I miss the old Prism Saturday night shows.

Content Sablinsky | July 6, 2010 6:22 pm
Possiby two organizations with which I am personally involved, namely, the Wednesday Music Club (of which I am President), and the Charlottesville Music Teachers Association.

Rick Kast | July 6, 2010 5:35 pm
I defer to the ideas already expressed many of which seem quite good.

matthew simon | July 6, 2010 4:20 pm
sponsor concerts. Charlottesville has such a wide variety of musical performances and VERY rarely are they associated with WTJU. Get with the venues!!!

Emily Sloan | July 6, 2010 3:28 pm
Concerts, events, picnics, fundraisers, benefits.

Alison Booth | July 6, 2010 3:09 pm
Oral history similar to the Story Corps project could produce biographies of local people of all kinds. Some could be focused on the histories of neighborhoods or regional towns.

Michaux Hood | July 6, 2010 1:51 pm
Partnerships with live venues, live streaming broadcasts from live venues.

Michael D. Mabry (Law 1991) | July 6, 2010 1:24 pm
Every time I visit Charlottesville I am duly impressed by how WTJU is so woven into the fabric of the community. I think the challenge for the Station is to extend beyond C’ville and reach out to the World. Targeted internet advertising should not be out of the question. Greater visibility on the University’s website and in alumni magazines would help. Reaching the World through the Internet requires increased attention to the web-based streams, which can be unreliable at times. Interfering with the Station’s programming content is definitively NOT the way to reach more people. WTJU’s programming, as currently constituted, is its greatest strength, as its devoted following attests. The greatest opportunity for the Station, I think, is to bring in listeners beyond the limits of its broadcast range.

Davis Salisbury | July 6, 2010 1:08 pm
All of the free concerts in town! As they are free, do they not fall into the range of events that WTJU can partner with? I am not an expert in non-profit rules and regulations, but it seems that the Fridays after Five events, and any other UVA free concert etc. could be fair game, with either broadcasts of said events provided by WTJU, which would involve a remote team of engineers, which could all be student-assisted or run (again, for credit). A regular concert series open to the public could even be created, either on grounds or not, with the specific purpose of providing students with the opportunity to learn audio-engineering and working with the musicians in a behind the scenes capacity. There are dozens of tasks that make a live performance go off well, and students would certainly find this exciting. So, a WTJU sponsored regular eveny, staffed by students and open to the community at large! This would create goodwill towards the University, the station, and give students valuable and exciting experience.

Brian Glover | July 6, 2010 10:45 am
See my comments on "How can WTJU do a better job of reaching potential student interns/volunteers?". Go out to where the music fans are.

kay slaughter | July 6, 2010 10:03 am
Could there be a partnership with Virginia NPR station? Reach out to local musicians/groups and their fans. Hold regular open houses when Bayley holds theirs or when there is the "downtown first fridays arts exhibits."

John Dean | July 6, 2010 12:15 am
The most obvious partnership for WTJU is with the music department at UVa. Also, any and all cultural / performance organizations in the local area. I believe the strength of the station is centered on music, and the station should look outward to the local music community to build a more substantial place for itself in that community. An off-the-top-of-my- head list of such organizations could include Live Arts, the Paramount Theater, the Wintergreen music festival, Ash Lawn Opera, Charlottesville Jazz Society, and various organizations or commercial venues promoting folk music or jazz performances. I believe the station would find immense support among local classical/jazz/folk musicians if they were encouraged to assist in the revitalization of the station.

David Robinson | July 5, 2010 10:44 pm
Sponsor public events that support WTJUs mission and UVA's mission. Remember: you're a media outlet. Act like one and broadcast news of local interest.

Cal Glattfelder | July 5, 2010 9:12 pm
not sure.

Malcolm Bell | July 5, 2010 7:08 pm
The station could limit public service announcements in classical programming to messages about performances of classical music in Cville, Waynesboro, Staunton, or interesting events in points farther afield like Richmond or DC (Virginia Opera, Washington Opera, for instance).

Sally Thomas | July 5, 2010 6:35 pm
PSAs could be a tool for getting charities and community organizations aware of WTJU, eager to put their news on WTJU, and spread the word to their membership to listen.

Harvey Liszt | July 5, 2010 5:55 pm
The local Chamber of Commerce, the Realtor's Association and other such trade groups should each have daily one-hour programs.

Ann Benner | July 5, 2010 5:32 pm
You could have a talk show about local non-profits where students are interns and volunteers.

Susie McRae | July 5, 2010 4:17 pm
How about providing feedback to the businesses that currently underwrite shows. Do you know how many people are tuning in to hear a particular show, any listener input on the businesses that advertise. Your marketing people could offer suggestions on promotions that the businesses and WTJU could do together.

greg wichelns | July 5, 2010 4:16 pm
Again, teach the peope how radio can enhance their lives. This is YOUR responsibility. What would TJ do?

Zack Perdue | July 5, 2010 3:58 pm
Live music venues such as The Southern, Paramount Theater.

Tina Eshleman | July 5, 2010 12:00 pm
I would look at organizations that align with students' interest -- Habitat for Humanity or the food bank or free clinic, for example -- as well as organizations that provide services students need, such as SARA and mental-health providers.

Bob Williamson | July 5, 2010 10:59 am
short appearances on shows by owners or managers of local venues about their places which would serve as advertising for them, and for which they could offer more discounts to TJU listeners

matthew kavanaugh | July 5, 2010 7:00 am
The Paramount. The Pavilion. The Jefferson.

Pete Marshall | July 4, 2010 6:45 pm
More live music, especially from local artists & groups, then tap into their support networks. I encouraged my live guests to let their fan base know they were going to be on.

Charles Choi | July 4, 2010 2:30 pm
Point examples that come to mind: * Work with Charlottesville City/Albemarle County to broadcast community meetings. * Work on cross-promotion of local community events.

Randy May | July 4, 2010 12:57 pm
Partner with other groups,music, theater, high school music, Independent movie, film festivals..There's plenty in this community to partner up with if you want some recognition or name association.

Christine buedel | July 4, 2010 11:54 am
More internet presence

Jay Kardan | July 4, 2010 9:58 am
Better coordination with the classical concert community in Charlottesville. Broadcasting live or recorded concerts would be a great idea, though it can be expensive.

Beth Hodsdon | July 4, 2010 9:42 am
Reach out to community music groups--broadcast performances, do more calendars, etc.

Marva Barnett | July 4, 2010 8:18 am
see above

Mary Anna Dunn | July 4, 2010 8:18 am
Oh please, reach out to the young musicians in our community. Partner with the Music Resource Center, the Charlottesville High School music programs (many of them award winning) The Youth Orchestra, The Blue Ridge School of Irish Music. Feature their music, provide volunteer opportunities and social opportunities. Identify your listeners by occupation and partner with them. In the fundraising question, I suggest teaming up with people with financial savvy. Do you have an enthusiastic supporter who works in finance, fundraising, or marketing? Invite that person to partner with a DJ for a marathon show. I know there are highly respected musicians in our community whose day jobs are in finance. GET THEM IN THERE.

Dave Rogers | July 3, 2010 12:43 pm
The main linkage needed right now is with Public Affairs to build a more effective promotional campaign.

Elizabeth Benzinger | July 3, 2010 10:52 am
There are many classical music events in the area, most of them generated right here. John Mitchell often interviews local musicians on his show; I have done this in the past. It's a lot of work but it should generate interest in the events. I would hope the organizers of these events appreciate the efforts the station makes and chooses to reciprocate, either in kind, with publicity for the radio station, or monetarily by sponsoring programming or by individual's contributing to our fund-raising efforts.

Liz Courain | July 3, 2010 9:06 am
Sponsor live music at Cville Coffee or other small venue we can afford. Ask staff or volunteers to attend the show and talk (very briefly) at the beginning about WTJU and invite people to listen (Paramount does this with sponsors and I find it very effective -- I have learned about some things of interest this way). Have non-traditional business cards made up with station contact info, call number, and "If you enjoy great music, try WTJU." Give a spot for the DJs to write in their name and show time. When a local group will be performing live at some future date, ask them to promote their appearance on their blog, Facebook, twitter and at live events.

Erik | July 3, 2010 8:56 am
I think a limited number of NPR programs or from Pacifica Radio or from some other syndicated source would be a plus. I also think that there's a potential among stores, restaurants, and other places that cater to university people and often have the radio station on in the background.

Fletcher Stevens | July 3, 2010 12:12 am
Local music organizations and venues.

Deborah Murray | July 2, 2010 6:39 pm
For a start, we should reach out to music professors and teachers, performing groups (symphony, municipal band, Tuesday Evening Concert Series, etc.)

Phyllis White | July 2, 2010 5:56 pm
Let's get creative about other sources of funding. How about an AD in the ALUMNI NEWS magazine? With 55 years of U.Va. alumni who might have appreciated WTJU, this might open up a large new segment of givers including lots of 'alternative' types who may have come into inheritances (like I will someday) whose heartstrings and pursestrings may be appealed to in support of WTJU. Also, I think this newer practice of requesting donations on a regular basis is a good idea and could be expanded and fine-tuned, e.g. promos for various music genres.

Judith Shatin | July 2, 2010 4:11 pm
Work with local instrumental groups to feature more local performers/composers. Also partner with groups such as PCA, Charlottesville Chamber Music Foundation, Music Resource Center.

Lisa Reeder | July 2, 2010 2:49 pm
Informal and formal sponsorship of local music scene - spotlight on local bands, bands coming to town, resident musicians of all types.

Jeffrey Fisher | July 2, 2010 12:54 pm
Maybe with other college radio stations around the country? Maybe with some promoters to do shows? Sponsor bringing Cake or OKGO or something?

Mary Dykes | July 2, 2010 11:47 am
Cover more local performances. Interview local performers on the air. Cover more university events including student productions. Carry the Miller Center Lectures, the Chamber Music Series, the Tuesday Evening Concert Series, etc. All these could be after the event but would attract listeners and help advertise various events that are on-going.

Liz Rhodes | July 2, 2010 10:09 am
WJTU needs to take advantage of a community that moves and works around partnerships and relationships with each other. They are so many groups WJTU can reach out to have joint events such as concerts or fundraisers. Events at the Paramount, the Jefferson, and working with organizations such as PCA. Exposure by partnerships is one of the greatest and free marketing techniques out there.

Jeff Roberts | July 2, 2010 1:36 am
Do you mean community or the UVA student community. These are distinct, as the current impetus for change would have it.

Gwen Loehr | July 1, 2010 12:16 pm
Education via all the local schools, not just the University. Offer internships to the high schools, CATEC and PVCC. Support the community as a whole. Community forums for local news/events.

Scott Cohen | July 1, 2010 11:49 am
Move the radio station to a location in the center of campus. Have a big window a la Good Morning America. (I'm only partly joking).

Michael Brooks | July 1, 2010 1:04 am
Expand gospel progamming on Sundays. Collaborate with local churches. Invite gospel choirs for live broadcast, or do live on-site broadcasting from area churches.

Katherine Perdue | June 30, 2010 8:35 pm
I found out about WTJU by going to concerts at the Prism, which sadly no longer exists. I think partnerships with local entertainment and concert venues would be beneficial for both groups.

James Ford | June 30, 2010 4:24 pm
There is plenty of opportunity for volunteers (especially student interns) to solicit underwriting from local businesses; speaking from firsthand experience, there has been very little institutional support for efforts to secure new underwriters for the stations programming. As I mentioned above, partnerships with student organizations would help

Terry Stegman | June 30, 2010 3:31 pm
Not my area of expertise. Maybe something with independent coffee shops.

Jane Foster | June 30, 2010 3:29 pm
I think most musical organizations in town would be happy to help WTJU with lists of supporters, with announcements to their members, etc. I shouldn't think there is any competition, that they value WTJU as a wonderful part of our cultural community.

Bill Davis | June 30, 2010 3:21 pm
Sponsor concerts and parties in different neighborhoods or communities

Elizabeth Hull | June 30, 2010 2:52 pm
Approach the various communities, including major donors, with the kind of attention and publicity that have been given to the University Art Museum and Madison House.

Janice Fischer | June 30, 2010 2:03 pm
Get involved with performing arts groups and not just those associated with UVA. It wouldn't hurt to reach out to them and to other schools in the area.

Walt Rodney | June 30, 2010 1:34 pm
Charlottesville is increasingly diverse. Link programs to community events and news.

Gary Westmoreland | June 30, 2010 12:09 pm
Partner with the Virginia Sports Radio Network for niche sports programming. In the UVA spring semester, the Virginia Sports Radio Network does not have an FM-affiliate broadcasting baseball and lacrosse games. To fill the gap, could WTJU broadcast select special games in UVA spring men and women sports? Examples could be a super-regional baseball final, a College World Series baseball game, and/or a semifinal or championship NCAA lacrosse game.

Shana Goldin-Perschbacher | June 30, 2010 10:12 am
I offered some ideas in the first answer that I think could help, for example, finding courses where students are working with people in the community, and having them create reports about the project. If community members are interviewed or featured, maybe they'll be more likely to listen to the show, and tune into the station more regularly.

Elizabeth Rinaca | June 30, 2010 9:29 am
How about reaching out to local public schools? I have found classical shows such as "The Early Music" show to be beneficial when teaching about the Baroque and Renaissance periods in history.

mary jo ayers | June 30, 2010 7:17 am
PERHAPS MORE INTERVIEWS AND LIVE MUSIC PROGRAMING.

Rick Mangione | June 30, 2010 2:16 am
operations should be exactly the same as the current format, with increased sharing of the benefits of its mission

Leni Sorensen | June 29, 2010 9:44 pm
Maybe with organizations such as the Quality Community Council or some of the foodies orgs, or Monticello -

Laura | June 29, 2010 8:57 pm
hook in with more local venues who already bring great music to town. have bands do live spots before the show. be present at local charlottesville events (have a booth, or remote broadcast at the city market, fridays after five, first fridays, parades, etc.)

Cafe Lady | June 29, 2010 8:54 pm
WTJU could really make some inroads by becoming a part of local businesses, theater, and creative venues. Sponsorship, public service announcements, and on-air spotlights of local and coming-to-town artists could provide a mutually beneficial arrangement.

Joyce Dudek | June 29, 2010 7:56 pm
local musicians, live broadcasts, a presence a local festivals and events. Sponsor for other non- profit events.

Laura Leavitt | June 29, 2010 5:26 pm
sponsor and live broadcast more live music events

Jennifer | June 29, 2010 3:59 pm
Co-present events at local venues. Offer mobile DJ services to community groups.

Marla Muntner | June 29, 2010 3:07 pm
sponsor local music and art events

David Soyka | June 29, 2010 1:57 pm
Local music events. Charitable events (e.g., run for breast cancer, maybe for putting a WTJU logo on a runner's shirt the charity can become an "underwriter" of a show for no charge).

Mark Hineline | June 29, 2010 1:15 pm
If possible, partner with Friday's After Five and local small music venues.

Joey Conover | June 29, 2010 12:23 pm
Broadcast live shows from the Pavilion, Jefferson Theater, Paramount Book festival - readings on the radio

Adam | June 29, 2010 11:46 am
Sponsor concerts/festivals/lectures in the Central VA area. It is not enough to be members from the community at the station, but actively involved with some events in the area. One example is you always hear about those great events at Ivy Creek Natural Area, but how about the station find a way to sponsor some of them?

wynne Stuart | June 29, 2010 11:16 am
Could interaction with local public radio help TJU increase its listening and donor bases?

Max Friedfeld | June 29, 2010 9:15 am
inviting more student performers, reaching out to musical organizations on grounds

Anna Stelow | June 29, 2010 6:47 am
UVA should make better use of the station. Lectures and student group performances should be broadcast.

Tes Slominski | June 29, 2010 12:33 am
WTJU has the potential to foster integration between the university and the community, and I think to some extent it always has fostered such a community. I think the best way to begin forging community partnerships would be to work toward strengthening a community of student and non-student WTJU volunteers--within all departments and across departments, so that rock isn't just students, and the other departments aren't just members of the outside community. Get the volunteers talking together en masse as a community, and ideas for outreach will fly thick and fast. Also, don't forget high school students and PVCC students. Reaching out to non-UVA students will only ever increase the station's listenership, fundraising capabilities, and pool of potential volunteers.

Michelle Vermillion | June 28, 2010 10:46 pm
Forge relationships where they may not already exist with live music venues in town, when there is a format compatibility. Ask venues/promoters to help spread the word of what WTJU offers listeners through its programming.

Kristin Szakos | June 28, 2010 10:00 pm
Community nonprofits

Pam Roland | June 28, 2010 9:45 pm
Perhaps partner with the local TV stations? I think the radio is a complement to them, not a threat. I can do things as I listen to WTJU; I often am stopped by the TV.

Starrie Williamson | June 28, 2010 4:00 pm
U.Va.

Bill Maisannes | June 28, 2010 1:21 pm
Alumni Association. Day of Caring. UVaClub of Charlottesville.

Aaron Bailey | June 28, 2010 12:25 pm
Partnerships w/ business of all sorts and music venues to encourage concert-going via giveaways?

Vic Szabo | June 28, 2010 11:39 am
UVA! It's astounding how disconnected the station is currently from the University that houses it.

anne metz | June 28, 2010 11:15 am
Utilizing the current set-up with media outlets. The Hook gives the station free advertising all the time. The station should use it more effectively instead of just running a general ad, why not make an ad for an upcoming events? It's a wasted opportunity!

Marcia Day Childress | June 27, 2010 8:27 pm
Be a visible presence around the university and in the community at various community events and activities.

Thomas Pease | June 27, 2010 6:10 pm
Partnerships with arts organizations within a wide range of central VA from Warrenton to Culpeper and over to Staunton.

Sandy Snyder | June 27, 2010 5:40 pm
Develop our relationships with the music venues in town - including the McIntire School of Music.

Anne Becker | June 27, 2010 3:39 pm
Does WTJU partner with the Music Resource Center, the next generation of radio listeners? Perhaps the station could have a presence at Fridays After Five (maybe that is a volunteer opportunity), a table with schedules and/or pencils to hand out? First Fridays art openings? Apologies if these are old already-done ideas...

Jay hertel | June 27, 2010 1:59 pm
WTJU should have a larger presence at concerts and festivals in the community. Like I mentioned with the on grounds music activities earlier, WTJU should be omnipresent at indie rock, folk, jazz, and classical events in the community.

Elizabeth Stark | June 27, 2010 11:46 am
-Concert venues, local bars, park events, events geared toward children, 2nd St Gallery, musician partnerships, and the Baily Museum. -Charlottesville has a great music scene and history. Solicit major gifts from the wealthy and the famous.

Mark Quigg | June 26, 2010 7:19 pm
Why don't youinvolve station with important community events? The Cville 10 miler. The annual first night of Virginia

Khristina VanHall | June 26, 2010 6:58 pm
local fests for one. I never see a banner anywhere

Anthony Gallo | June 25, 2010 10:31 am
local newspapers/blogs, music venues

Geof Carter | June 25, 2010 6:59 am
See above. Promote WTJU as a source of music education, in keeping with its academic

Kirsten Miles | June 25, 2010 6:51 am
WTJU might consider soliciting some research into successful and innovative strategies at other colleges, partner with local radio stations in terms of encouraging student interns opportunities to visit, potentially inviting on and off-campus community supporters to convene annual conferences to collaborate over successful strategies (for promoting non-profit activities, university events, etc.). Help in identifying target audiences and opportunity for audience feedback and participation holds more information and student volunteers and employees should have access to this information.

Jordan Taylor | June 25, 2010 2:39 am
Businesses that love us should be given a "Proud to play The TEEJ" in this establishment. Again, a nice design and some whimsy could promote a little more fellowship in the station. What about having local libraries featuring recently heard on WTJU tables for recent classical, jazz, folk programming? We need to be a significant presence at every concert venue in town.

Andrew Pratt | June 24, 2010 10:32 pm
Interested student or community volunteers should be paired with every venue that presents and every group that plays music, from JPJ to the Paramount to jazz clubs and student groups. The symbiotic promotion of the venues and of WTJU would be salutary for all.

Stuart Gilchrist | June 24, 2010 6:23 pm
Promote and sponsor music and arts events.

U.Va. employee and music fan | June 24, 2010 4:38 pm
They could "sponsor" shows at local venues and work with the local record shops more.

How could the music format of WTJU be improved?

Rose Ann | July 23, 2010 6:30 pm
Don't change it - unless students or others provide even more commentary about what we're listening to now. There's nothing else like WTJU, here or anywhere else I've lived. Just let more people know about it.

Katie Vogel | July 23, 2010 1:19 pm
I like the music format how it is now. I like the variety--classical, jazz, folk, rock, punk, etc.

stevie jay | July 23, 2010 12:21 pm
Please keep the music format the same as it's been for a long, long time. Our world is suffering with the process of STREAMLINING everything--removing the creative, human element, buffing out the "rough" edges. WTJU's most outstanding feature has always been its eclectic tastes and styles provided by its DJs. The recent proposal to change over to standard rotations and to otherwise start controling the programming was cause for alarm amongst thousands of Charlottesvillians who LOVE WTJU THE WAY IT IS! Please, PLEASE don't start fixing something that isn't broken, my friends! PLEASE! WTJU is a gem, complete with all its colors and textures and quirkiness--and frankly, we need more of that kind of diversity EVERYWHERE these days. We're all drowning in a sea of American Idol--we don't need any more slickness. Thank you, thank you!! Stevie Jay

Scott Pettis | July 23, 2010 11:57 am
I would STRONGLY urge not changing the format because of reasons cited above.

Daniel J Holm | July 21, 2010 7:27 pm
I feel the programming is very diverse. While I don't care for certain music, it doesn't turn me off completely. Perhaps some feel the same about my musical tastes, and I'm a loyal listener.

Philip Stafford | July 21, 2010 3:54 pm
Hard to imagine improving on such an interesting format of music.

George | July 21, 2010 2:11 pm
Try listing to other very successful stations that operate under very similar circumstances. WNCW, WXPN.

Brian Keena | July 20, 2010 10:52 pm
By leaving it alone. What are you implying? The format should be left to the control of the DJ. THAT is what makes WTJU great and unique. Tamper with that, and you've got another "Anystation" from "Anytown, USA."

James Shelton | July 19, 2010 11:30 pm
Keep it the same. Live what I heard.

William Hale | July 19, 2010 7:27 am
As above. We do not need to be preprogrammed, but we probably need to be a little less "wierd" in order to be more attractive to more people. I am not sure I am a good judge, but I find the rock programming occasionally wonderful, but generally unlistenable.

Tim Ballo | July 17, 2010 9:00 pm
I'm biased by my musical preferences, but a more equitable allotment of daytime programming hours between the four departments would help.

Brian Rakita | July 17, 2010 6:10 pm
Nothing comes to mind. I'm not a big fan of your classical or the M-T+F 2-4 shows, but I'm sure other people are, so more power to them.

richard f. jones | July 17, 2010 11:01 am
stop the chatter on reggae vibes............PLAY MORE MUSIC

Nancy Deutsch | July 16, 2010 3:57 pm
see above - keep announcer based programming and don't move to a play list format but could consider blocking genres by type of day

Peter Tschirhart | July 15, 2010 10:28 pm
I think that much is great as-is. Although I think it would not be a bad idea to add some non-music programming--whether that means news or opinion or some combination of those.

Michael Heny | July 15, 2010 9:23 pm
It really couldn't-- The open format allows the unexpected, unhoped for and necessary to happen. When you type in "Fiddler on the Roof" and "Sex Pistols" on Pandora you don't get "Gogol Bordello". That's what keeps us coming back to WTJU. There are some segments like the 30 second naturalist & the crank of dawn that I wish could be repeated a few times--they are excellent but I seem to miss them.

eve schwartz | July 15, 2010 8:54 am
I think the current format makes a great deal of sense, and it is actually fairly predictable. Most people's schedules M-F are routine (work, classes, etc) and weekends are variable. So, too, the station's schedule: weekday mornings are classical followed by jazz, followed by music that has its feet in two worlds, followed by rock, followed by news...Do not cut back classical or jazz programing. These are the genres with pedagogy behind them and as such are important to the educational mission of station. And if you would like to increase donations to the station, cutting the genre (classical) that attracts your most reliable and generous donors is illogical and counterproductive to your ultimate goals.

Valerie L'Herrou | July 14, 2010 7:25 pm
For the most part, I like the current programming blocks. They could use some tweaking, I suppose. I think this needs to be done with careful thought and input from the department directors. --I can't answer the radio-button question of which type of music I listen to most, b/c I listen to it all! --However, what might be useful, is to have a survey asking for PROPORTIONALLY which music they listen to most, and then, *would that change* if the music was at a different time. This could be done by multiple choice, or by ranking. --You could end up with a nice graph of when the various genres would be most listened to, which would be the most useful guide.

Tom Tartaglino | July 14, 2010 8:13 am
I am used to the format but if it were me you were catering to, I would like to hear a world beat type music around dinner time. Something up beat to cook to and entertain to.

Ginny Chilton | July 13, 2010 8:39 pm
It would be wonderful if it was easier for more students to get involved in creating and hosting their own shows. Other than that, I think TJU has a lot to be proud of in terms of their format. I like that it promotes a wide array of genres. Tuning in to TJU is such an easy, fun way to broaden your horizons. You never know what you're going to get, which is the opposite of your average radio station, and we should be proud of that! There are people who tune in to radio waiting to hear something familiar, something they already know. There are a million radio stations that serve that purpose; it's a good thing that our station is different.

Jocelyn Pace | July 13, 2010 7:52 pm
WPRB. Princeton's college radio station is phenomenal. They don't limit esoteric shows to the middle of the night, but you can hear anything from Tom Waits to funk to space opera at four in the afternoon. I have a three year old, I'm awake at four in the afternoon. My family visits the Philly area several times a year and we listen almost exclusively to WPRB while we're up there. We love it. We love the variety. We love the fact that we can hear Screamin' Jay Hawkins and PJ Harvey in the same set, followed by Dalek and The Boredoms. We like the garage band shows which play stuff from the 1950s and stuff that sounds like it was recorded in the 1960s, but actually just turned up last week. We like hearing rare funk tracks and b-sides from more popular bands of yesteryear. We like hearing things that we never would have expected to hear on any radio station, John Cage or something that possibly escaped from one of Bjork's nightmares. And we like opera, yes. And greek drinking songs. And Turkish dance music. Lots of variety, but never the same thing twice.

Lesley Myers | July 13, 2010 3:46 pm
This station is a true jewel--I've traveled in Asia and Europe, and traveled and lived across the USA, and it is unique. Do NOT go to playlists and all college rock format!! You will only alienate your current loyal listeners, and you won't get any new ones. Consider more live performances with local musicians--the Free Bridge Quintent, the UVA Jazz Ensemble, Oratorio Society members, Devin Sproule, Paul Curreri--we have so many great performers in Charlottesville!

C. Garges | July 13, 2010 10:10 am
More classical

Roger Clarke | July 13, 2010 4:15 am
The music format is wonderful as it is now. I would hate to see any music cut or disappeared. It is invaluable to be able to hear all these great genres of music! Please, please DO NOT cut or eradicate Classical Music or Jazz! These are sublime musical forms that teach all able to hear them. WTJU's expert djs in these musics are great treasures to us all as they share their love for music. And Rock and Folk must continue to have their substantial places, too, and room made for Blues, Soul, Gospel, World, Bluegrass, and Oldtime. So too must room be preserved for Chamber, Choral, Opera, Ecclesiastical, and Early Musics. Organically, WTJU's marvellous volunteers have arranged themselves into a balanced formation that allows all these genres and sub-genres to be heard. Indeed, the work of these fine volunteers weaves together a rich, vast and fascinating tapestry. It is incontestably a great cultural treasure and heritage for the University community. I listen to all of these musics, each and every one: I love best 20th Century Classical, Early Music, Chamber, Ecclesiastical, Opera, Choral, Organ, Pre-war Blues, Electric Blues, Rhythm and Blues, Early Rock 'n' Roll, Psychedelia, Garage, British Invasion, 60's Soul, Oldtime, Classic World Musics, Classic Folk, 60's Folk, Folk-Rock, Early 70's British Folk and their progeny, Canadian Folk, 60's and 70's Afro-Pop, so-called Blue note Jazz, Pre-war early Jazz, Electric Jazz, European Jazz, Fado, Samba, American Popular Song, Classic War-era Ballroom Dance, Broadway, all the alternative icons in the history of Rock, Experimental Electronic Music, the Classical Romantic pantheon, the Baroque, the Russian composers, Chiming-Guitar Folk-Rock, American Parlor, select Rockabilly, Countrypolitan, Singer-Songwriter, Classic Cowboy/Cowgirl Western music, Jazz-Funk, genre-exceeding Techno and Synth, and yes, even some exceptional Disco. Oh, and Joanna Newsom.

Don Harrison | July 12, 2010 11:58 pm
I love the lineup as it is. There are so many great shows currently running - too many to name - in all musical genres. But that's not to say we don't need to juice it up a bit. WTJU lost a big one when the "Live at the Prism Coffeehouse" went away. The station needs a big anchor show like that, featured in prime time - a live showcase, a variety hour. We need something that serves as an anchor show. Perhaps this would be a way for all four departments and a variety of student broadcasters to collaborate.

Werner K. Sensbach | July 12, 2010 11:42 pm
Establish more classical programs and make them a beloved and honored tradition like an all-Beethoven program on December 16th in honor of Beethoven's birthday, the Messiah broadcast, the Sunday Opera, the fantastic A Time for Singing, Michael Latskos Organ broadcasts, The Early Music Show, La Belle Music etc. and advertise them

Susan C Scott | July 12, 2010 10:34 pm
I like it the way it is. If too much is changed, it would run the risk of losing listeners like me who literally schedule their time to hear certain programs (such as opera on Sunday afternoons).

Ellen Contini-Morava | July 12, 2010 8:37 pm
It is already excellent and fulfills the educational mission of the university by broadening the range of music and ideas that people are exposed to on the air. Keep up the unique, eclectic mix of both music and news!

Linn Harrison | July 12, 2010 6:00 pm
I am sure it WON'T be improved by homogenizing it and dictating song rotations centrally. AS so mnay others have said, the unique programming and in depth understanding of musical genres shared by the DJs is key to TJU's strength. It offfers such an opportunity to learn about music you wuld not encounter otherwise. We don't need another commercial broadcasting experience.

Toni Barskile | July 12, 2010 3:59 pm
I really like most of the jazz programming and I like the fact that the djs are very knowledgeable about the music that they play. I enjoy the soulful situation show and would like more soul, r&b, and acid jazz/neo-soul programming. I also enjoy the eclectic women show, and some of the world music programming when I can catch it.

Beth Burnam | July 12, 2010 3:25 pm
Print a program on a refrigerator magnet. Stick to it.

Rob Sheffield | July 12, 2010 3:05 pm
The station's diversity is a treasure and an achievement. Most of what I know about classical, jazz and folk comes from WTJU--even though it was the rock that originally got me listening. That's just one of the ways the station extends the University's educational mission.

Virginia Daugherty | July 12, 2010 2:38 pm
I like it as it is. Any changes should be creative, and certainly not trying to make it like a commercial station.

Sharon Defibaugh | July 12, 2010 2:37 pm
I really enjoy the classical and folk music, since no one else much offers that choice. Hopefully WTJU would offer the same amount or more opportunities for that.

Keith Alnwick | July 12, 2010 2:31 pm
Balance and diversity are essential to and should be preserved at all costs. Nothing sounds like WTJU, nothing stimulates like WTJU. Different genres / programming blocks intertwining throughout the year and fundraising marathons are part of the stations DNA.

Bryan Wright | July 12, 2010 2:23 pm
If possible, through making it more diverse.

Michael Holroyd | July 12, 2010 1:48 pm
I'm not sure what the "music format" means here.

Peter Hedlund | July 12, 2010 12:22 pm
It's pretty good the way it is.

Lynn Hedlund | July 12, 2010 12:02 pm
I would give money to WTJU if it promised not to drastically change the music format.

Dennis DaLuiso | July 12, 2010 11:51 am
Chuck Taylor was a jazz DJ and loaded up the schedule to his taste. Stay neutral to this sort of thing.

Thom Pease | July 12, 2010 11:21 am
Actually, my other thought about the music is not necessarily that the classical, jazz or folk slots need to be improved or even dayparted. That is nice of course, but it does drive a wedge into an audience that could actually be integrated. CBC Two used to have a dynamic, eclectic format which moved freely from a Beethoven symphony to a folk song to a jazz piece. It was a interesting approach to radio, that I think stations should do more in the era of "shuffle" we live in. Plus it encourages cross-format experimentation.

Carol chandross | July 12, 2010 11:17 am
follow the advice of looking at other college campuses, one of the blogs stated a Boston school.

kate nesbitt | July 12, 2010 10:39 am
I think it works better when no more than 2 people share a show. It provides more consistency. Lately 4 people have been alternating and that is less successful. I like the varying hours and formats currently offered.

Michael Ludgate | July 12, 2010 10:14 am
Cut out the DJ plays what they want policy

Carla Arton | July 12, 2010 7:41 am
More variety.

Joan Fenton | July 12, 2010 6:53 am
Block out the times for types of music. I have no idea when something is on. I hit the button on my car and either stop at WTJU or go on, depending on what is on, but I have no times that I know I want to listen If I know folk was every day from 6-8pm, then I would know to turn my radio to the station at that time. WNRN has Acoustic Sunrise, and I know the only time I turn to that station is from 6-9

Mike Krueger | July 12, 2010 2:27 am
None of the suggestion for this that I have read have impressed me at all so I would suggest the bold step of pretty much keeping the format the way it is. If egos and mindless institutional imperatives make 'improvements' necessary than let them be modest in scope.

Susanna Spencer | July 11, 2010 11:42 pm
I don't listen to classical that much, though nothing wrong with it. love the music on late Friday night! Definitely should be consistent with schedule. People will tune in at same time.

Alfreda Melvin | July 11, 2010 9:59 pm
The current format has a great lot to recommend it, and we've always considered WTJU to be a little-recognized treasure of the personal in a plastic world. It would be a shame to lose that treasure. Perhaps a review of the format with regard to how it reflects the pace of a given day... uptempo during mornings as people rush to work, calming midday and late at night, playful and pleasant during rush hour, etc. The great advantage now is that DJ's offer what they love, and it shows. Also wondering if the DJ's could be encouraged to include more tasty bits of information about specific songs, artists or composers' lives or origins of songs to season the soup of the offerings.

J May | July 11, 2010 9:46 pm
I like it just the way it is. Perhaps a posting on the website of specific genres would encourage more listeners?

Peter Henderson | July 11, 2010 6:58 pm
It's just about perfect. But I miss the Show Show. And more free spirited deejays late at night. It's okay to have a little fun before we die. Also, I don't want to see more news and talk at the expense of music. There's already plenty of talk radio and news too. Don't try to be all things to all people. But the main thing to recognize is that WTJU is a rare gem among radio stations and has been for many years and it is really premature to start talking as if they are doing something wrong just because not everybody likes Mozart or jazz or because contributions everywhere are down in a rotten economy and WTJU is no different. I feel sorry for the announcers and staff who have done such a wonderful job and must feel like they have been judged and found wanting. Guys and gals, I love you all!

Henry Wiencek | July 11, 2010 5:48 pm
I like the eclectic mix you have. Something for everyone. I like the classical programming, blues, "In the Spirit," "Jumpin' On the Bed," "Vagabond Shoes."

Steve Guion | July 11, 2010 9:56 am
Don't be like all the other stations across the country. Expose your listeners to new, forgotten or ignored music. Be to music what UVA is to learning - teach people about the vast amount of wonderful music there is in this world. I already know more about Lil Wayne and Lady GaGa than I ever wanted to know! Teach me something else.

Pamela Blevins | July 11, 2010 8:46 am
Increase the classical programming and offer documentaries about music and the people who create it and perform it.Show the connections between serious music and pop music and how the two are not so distantly related.

Vern Buchanan | July 11, 2010 7:59 am
Not real crazy about the type of latino stuff on Friday night . It sound too much like commercial radio . With that exception this is a diamond of a format .

Lori Derr | July 10, 2010 8:03 pm
Please keep the diversity for one thing. The majority of the DJs are excellent, but a few need more mentoring before they should be allowed to broadcast independently

Aaron Zatcoff | July 10, 2010 4:20 pm
Have regular departmental sharing, listening sessions and meetings to discuss current music that interests us and the public. Have trainings to upgrade deejay skills, teach us better how to make promotional announcements.

kevin burns | July 10, 2010 3:42 pm
Mostly by leaving it alone. What i like most about the staion is the incredible diversity that i find there. Though my preferred genres are folk and rock i greatly enjoy the jazz and classical music mixed in and the fact that hearing the same music twice in one day is not likely to happen on there. My favorite music is new music, something i'm hearing for the first time, and i get lots of that on WTJU. Maximizing the number of different shows and styles of music is what i want to see in the future. Please keep up the good work that the station has been doing for the last 30 years.

Prue Thorner | July 10, 2010 2:17 pm
Less talking on the classical shows. Fewer PSAs.

Tim Beeghly | July 10, 2010 1:31 pm
I believe with better training and more interaction with dj's with their PD at 1 or 2 required dept. meetings. That could enhance training through the mentor process.

Ruth Cross | July 10, 2010 10:48 am
It would be hard to improve on full-length opera every Sunday afternoon, among other programming. "If it ain't broke..."

Dan Goldberg | July 10, 2010 10:18 am
I really like the format as it is. It may be possible to mix up the formats a little more, if done in a way that is not too confusing.

t davis | July 10, 2010 8:26 am
Please, pretty please keep your early morning classical programming, and the early evening classical programming during the early part of the week. I remember years ago the station played folk on Sunday afternoons; bring that back! More classical and more folk! Form a partnership with WNRN and leave the rock and indie music -- which WNRN does really, really well -- and let WTJU become THE station for classical, folk/traditional, reggae and jazz music.

Jace Goodling | July 10, 2010 7:55 am
WTJU is already pone of the top college stations I have heard, with its variety, etc..

Mark Greenfield | July 9, 2010 8:11 pm
I have always thought, in my 23 years in the area, that your radio staion is the best at diversity. Will milk toast music listeners tune in? Nope, there is enough commercial radio for them to listen to. Should they? Yep, they might have their horizons expanded. But, narrow minded folks tend to stay narrow minded. Are you an institution of higher learning or are you going to teach to the median?

Clarice Schermerhorn | July 9, 2010 5:13 pm
I don't think changing the format is going to help bring in more listeners. The diversity of music heard on WTJU is the great strength of the station, and dropping classical, or moving rock to late at night, is not going to get you where you want to go.

Will Harvey | July 9, 2010 4:22 pm
I think it would be hard to improve on a format that educates listeners to so many forms of music. I do occassionally turn the volume down, and soemtimes I turn it up. I turn to another channel between 4-5 P.M. because I can go online during the day to find breaking news w/o commentary that I don't need.

A. Soroka | July 9, 2010 1:15 pm
It can't. The hourly schedule can and should be tweaked to produce the best listening experience possible, but the free-form nature of programming and the wide and diverse musical presentations are the soul of WTJU. Period.

Michael Sokolowski | July 8, 2010 7:00 pm
I do agree that the schedule either needs to be easier for listeners to remember, or the shifting programming needs to be reinforced more by on-air statements. Promote special on-air events more. While I love the individuality of the jocks, they should somehow unite more under the overall umbrella. Help each other out, across genres, time slots, etc. Put more overall promotional energy and enthusiasm into your daily efforts.

john costanza | July 8, 2010 6:03 pm
the format is great just like it is. i like the fact that you get a broad range of music. every possible style of music, no matter its age, should be presented if possible.

David J. Simpson | July 8, 2010 5:41 pm
Have genres at regular time-sots 7 days a week. Classical early a.m. as now, evenings 5.0-7.0 or 8.0 pm. Good jazz,swing, popular/show-tunes say 9.0 am to midday. Hard rock, alternative/world, folk midday to 4.0pm and 8.0pm on. News 4.0-5.0pm but for heaven's sake get rid of the rubbish now being pureyed. Why not back to the BBC World News?

Matt Ulibarri | July 8, 2010 5:00 pm
I don't know, but I do know that implementing playlists would be a step backward.

Woody Parrish | July 8, 2010 4:57 pm
The current schedule works pretty well for me. I have favorite shows in Jazz, Rock, and Classical genres. You may find ways to improve on it, but cancelling claccical programming, and only playing rock when I'm in bed, asleep, is not going to make this listener happy.

Mary Ann | July 8, 2010 3:28 pm
- Don't change or limit the genre or content of programs. The diversity and eclectic nature of the programming is what makes WTJU unique in the area! Let that be your identity! It fits with your Vision Statement (... "full service public radio station" ...) and your Mission Statement ("To present ... diverse programming ..."). - Consider adding more non-music programs, such as a local "marketplace" program thet highlights topics from Darden, as well as local business news, problems/solutions, upcoming challanges, topics of interest, and success stories.

Ron Povich | July 8, 2010 2:19 pm
The musical offerings are pretty awesome. WTJU offers some cross-genre and/or eclectic programming; these offerings could be increased on weekends.

Karen O'Brien | July 8, 2010 2:12 pm
DO NOT CHANGE THE EXISTING FORMAT. it is fine - the wealth of knowledge and idiosyncrasies that the individual DJs bring is your strength. The only thing I'd add would be some more space for students - Fri and Sat nights, or a student news or call-in show.

Marietta McCarty | July 8, 2010 11:49 am
I like it. I like being surprised and hearing vinyl and unsung classical pieces and LEARNING about music. I like the democratic feel of volunteer participation and their freedom to play the music they know well and love. I like its spirit and refusal to bow to mass mediocrity.

Cyndy Williams | July 8, 2010 9:16 am
I love that there are every type of music on throughout the day. I'm sure there is room for even more variety, but don't do away with what you have, just add to it & mix it up some.

Jeff Carlin | July 8, 2010 8:44 am
The genre-hopping, while enjoyable to me, is confusing to many people. There should be consistency from day to day in the type of programming heard at a given time. I also think that while I enjoy much of the classical programming on WTJU, I would rather hear more music from actively changing and evolving styles (i.e., rock and its offshoots around the world, and to a lesser extent, jazz and folk/"roots"). Sure, lots of great music was made during the 18th century, but an innovative, cutting-edge institution should be highlighting more current/recent music (or at least some clever and interesting aspect of the "old" stuff). I don't see much possibility for that with classical music (and would welcome more "edgy" 20th-century composers among WTJU programming). Maybe I'm a "rockist", but that's because that's where I hear musical innovation happening, so rock, hip hop, electronica, etc. are what I think WTJU should be focusing on. Oh, and the BBC and Democracy Now are unnecessary -- canned news programs are not WTJU's niche! Leave those for other stations (which already have them) and play more music!

Colin Campbell | July 7, 2010 10:14 pm
Again, better scheduling of different genres is absolutely key. But now is the time to reinvent WTJU entirely, or to, as the new GM seems to want, duplicate a relatively successful station from another market. Each department - folk, rock, jazz and classical - have their place, and more importantly to those worried about the bottom line, a preexisting fan base who contribute. Classical, it should be noted, is particularly financially supported.

Sarah (A & S, 1984) | July 7, 2010 9:34 pm
Frankly, I would hate to see the format changed. I love turning on TJU and hearing music that I cannot hear anyplace else. There are few true college stations left in this country and I would hate to see WTJU go the way of set play lists. I have not listened to commercial radio since discovering WTJU as an undergraduate and will not continue to listen if I cannot tell the difference between TJU and commercial stations.

Valerie Matthews | July 7, 2010 8:12 pm
Music department and musical groups' participation.

William Shoup | July 7, 2010 6:32 pm
Continue to engender creativity. The same-old same-old will just take WTJU to the same mediocre level as WNRN which would be improved if it were turned into a 24 hour traffic report station.

Bev Ogilvie | July 7, 2010 5:16 pm
I love it just the way it is!

ned oldham | July 7, 2010 5:09 pm
Allow off-studio production, and encourage creative editing. Wtju could become a breeding ground for shows that attract national attention. Take the current Garage Sale (when Jimmy the Truth is at the mic); or Radio Fredonia; these could be held up as examples of strong personality-based shows that also showcase really cool music; for interns to be challenged to work toward being entertaining hosts.

Josh Krahn | July 7, 2010 4:36 pm
More contemporary (meaning currently active artists) during daytime hours. Also more music that is avant-garde or otherwise trailblazing. This is where the music department could be a great partner. I would vote for more Rock hours, but that's just my personal taste.

Margaret Lee | July 7, 2010 3:22 pm
More classical music.

Peter Welch | July 7, 2010 3:17 pm
The programming on WTJU is fine as is. Perhaps some slight tweaking of the schedule but that's it.

Swami Jyoti | July 7, 2010 2:38 pm
fine as is

Mike | July 7, 2010 1:58 pm
More consistent format. Drop classical and most jazz.

Cindy Benton-Groner | July 7, 2010 1:49 pm
I personally would like more world music and less rock. More programs that cut across set categories that highlight innovative music. More special programming as in fundraisers.

Bob Girard | July 7, 2010 12:52 pm
It's difficult to remember our youth, but WTJU deserves credit for expanding the musical boundaries of EVERYONE who tunes in or has ever tuned in. The station may well be among the smartest stations in the world for that reason. If you try to formalize or "formula-ize" programming with who knows what then you know you'll likely kill it & its listener base. The power of this station resides in the creativity and quirkiness of its programmers and its programming. I've seen lots of stations fiddle with formatting w/o ever finding an audience. Don't lose what you have in pursuit of something you probably won't get.

Bridge Cox | July 7, 2010 11:10 am
I do agree that maybe more coherent blocks of genre would be good. I believe the word Burr is using is called "striping." I've often heard complaints from the community about not knowing when to listen, however, that also shows the unwillingness of the public to put forth the effort which doesn't bode well for anything that takes effort. For instance, slip on shoes are far more popular than ever these days. Why? Because tying your shoes just takes sooo much effort.

Marsha Burger | July 7, 2010 10:14 am
I like the current format. Especially the Sunday early morning classical show.

Peter Brunjes | July 7, 2010 8:49 am
I love it as is. I turn on WTJU never knowing what to expect, hoping to find something different and out of the ordinary.. something that will teach me about new music. I'm rarely disappointed.

Rusty Trainham | July 7, 2010 12:26 am
Knowledge and creativity are the keys. The best DJs should be on the air, and in the right time slots (a marketing survey can help determine the right time slots). Historically, WTJU's diversity has been its strong point, and its listeners have greatly appreciated that diversity. Having classical, folk, jazz, rock, and spoken word coming from a single antenna is a rare and remarkable phenomenon, especially when it is done well, as historically WTJU has.

Benjie and Bob O'Connell | July 6, 2010 8:46 pm
We like the mix.

Becky Calvert | July 6, 2010 6:53 pm
It can't be. WTJU is incredibly diverse and should be treasured. I don't always care for particular formats myself, but I just because I don't like them doesn't mean others don't. There is all kinds of music out there and alot of what gets played on WTJU you simply cannot hear anywhere else. Tinkering with the basic format is just wrong. Instituting a playlist of any sort is wrong. WRONG. It would ruin the beauty of WTJU. If I had to change anything, I would cut down on the folk and 'americana' that I can hear elsehwhere.

Content Sablinsky | July 6, 2010 6:22 pm
I have no comments on this.

Rick Kast | July 6, 2010 5:35 pm
Although my interest are primarily in classical music and jazz, I think the current mix is fine.

Richard Guy Wilson | July 6, 2010 3:34 pm
keep the classical....make more of it and get rid of some of the silly stuff you have now.

Sally C. Booker | July 6, 2010 3:19 pm
I am disheartened to learn of the proposed changes to WTJU.  I hope you appreciate that this radio station is a gem and a sweeping overhaul in programming would be disastrous. 

Lynne and Steve Bair | July 6, 2010 2:19 pm
More not less classical music.

Michaux Hood | July 6, 2010 1:51 pm
I was a DJ (briefly) at WTJU and looking back on that experience I felt that there could have been improved mentorship/ guidance for choosing a play list that fit with the station mission. (of course can see how the mission needs defining first). This is not in support of being given a required playlist, but rather top down guidance - clarify the mission and provide training for current and new DJs on how to support that mission through the programming they choose.

Michael D. Mabry (Law 1991) | July 6, 2010 1:24 pm
I do not particularly think that the music format is in need of improvement. I certainly think that suggestions to mainstream the music format – such as the introduction of playlists – would be severely detrimental to programming quality. I trust WTJU’s all-volunteer DJs – they are smart, knowledgeable and musically sophisticated. When Prof. Bebop or the Contessa or Atlantic Weekly or Radio Wowsville wants me to hear a song, I listen with open ears and appreciate the work they have put into the selection. More to the point – but again unstated – is why you think the format needs to be improved? Indeed, the whole premise behind the “change is needed” argument is very opaque, and the absence of any concrete proposal on this website undermines its credibility. And no, the PowerPoint doesn't count as "concrete."

Davis Salisbury | July 6, 2010 1:08 pm
There is no simple answer to this, as any change deprives the station of something, but obviously change is coming and is necessary. I would increase Rock programming, as this is the bridge to the students. It has been relegated to very limited (and mostly late) hours for a long time. Any notion that other stations in town are essentially already providing adequate "rock" programming are false: none of these stations play rock music that is as diverse or high-quality as WTJU. I am not going to go into too much detail, but really there is just no comparison. WTJU Rock DJ alums such as Rob Sheffield, Stephen Malkmus, James McNew, Joe Gross, etc. etc., have gone on to become successful musicians and critics. Not just cool people, but critically respected and cutting-edge contributors in their field who are paid to be just that. This is a tremendous legacy and points to the fact that WTJU Rock DJs are trend-setters and critically accomplished at what they do already. If you look at what they play, they are generally ahead of the curve, so why drag them back to the pack? They play a lot of music that is currently popular, but apply an academic and critical eye to it, so that music that is without a reasonable amount of artisic merit is generally not going to get played. Still, the shows are enjoyable and full of great, accessible music. I believe all of the DJs, Classical, Jazz, and Folk included, provide this service at WTJU. Watering that aspect down does not seem to be the solution to me.

Hal Dean | July 6, 2010 10:58 am
LESS Roots music. Enough already. Recognize that appealing to young people is essential - young folks who have wide-ranging tastes, have grown up in an era when anyone can easily learn all there is to know about any type of music, any musician.

Brian Glover | July 6, 2010 10:45 am
Don't mess with it! WTJU is one of the finest free-form stations in the country (second only to WFMU, IMHO). I listen to WTJU because I want to be surprised by intelligent DJs who know more than I do. Trust them.

kay slaughter | July 6, 2010 10:03 am
I like the current format and the individuality of different programs. However, I often forget what programs are on when so any effort to remind us when our favorites are likely to be heard would be appreciated.

Ana Askew | December 31, 1969 7:00 pm
I strongly prefer the eclectic programming, and non-mainstream music, and allowing dj's to bring in music to share that is in the genre for their programs..When I want to listen to mainstream music with repetitive programs and play lists, I know where to find those stations..wtju as it has been is a jewel, with it's variety and the passions of it's dj's. I particularly like folk, irish/british isles music, world music,as well as classical.on occasion, I have enjoyed the live music by local artists..Don't fix what is not broken.I would build on the eclectic strengths.do more in that direction.

John Dean | July 6, 2010 12:15 am
The freedom of DJs to share the music they love is one of the station's greatest strengths. Don't lose that! I do think, though, that the station may need to specialize more. I don't think it's the go-to place for alternative rock anymore. Also, I can agree with the station management that the schedule may need to be more predictable. But please don't change it by inserting a lot of public affairs or other talk-radio programming. In the morning, for example, my wife always tunes in WTJU on the way to work because there's excellent classical music instead of the news. This makes WTJU unique. You'll never be able to out-do NPR. Keep to what the station does best (music), and keep the programming local!

David Robinson | July 5, 2010 10:44 pm
It's an amazingly unique product already. The format is the last thing that needs to change. There are precious few stations in this country that have such a unique offering. You cannot get that back once you loose it.

Cal Glattfelder | July 5, 2010 9:12 pm
Let the djs continue to play what they want without repetition being forced on them. Certain shows should not be moved around, such as Friday 2pm reggae which is such a great way to let us knowthe weekend is here.

Malcolm Bell | July 5, 2010 7:08 pm
More classical programming! On Thursday evenings, for instance.

Sally Thomas | July 5, 2010 6:35 pm
It's very good, now. It could easily be harmed. For example, interrupting an opera or classical music piece to put some news report on the air top of the hour is a horrible idea. If I want to hear the news, I know where to get the news and it's not on WTJU. For the rare privilege of listening to uncut, uninterrupted classical music, WTJU is unique. It also would be a serious mistake to make anything repetitive. WTJU is so wonderful precisely because it is not repetitive. Even the best music is ruined by hearing it too often, in my opinion.

Harvey Liszt | July 5, 2010 5:55 pm
As Rick Mantione of the Blacksburg PBS station said in his comment, the music format of WTJU isn't broken so don't try to fix it.

Ann Benner | July 5, 2010 5:32 pm
I wouldn't touch it.

Susie McRae | July 5, 2010 4:17 pm
I think the music format is okay. It's eclectic and I like turning my radio on and hearing something unexpected. For those people who want to know what to expect, again, make it easier for people to know the schedule. If you don't want to print them, how about giving out the next day's schedule on the air a couple of times per day.

greg wichelns | July 5, 2010 4:16 pm
Its pretty good as is. maybe less banjo. :) Seriously though, I often tell people how fortunate I am to have such a station just up the street from where I live. What speakes to me; Sat and Sun mornings, Thursday evenings, Friday evenings.

Zack Perdue | July 5, 2010 3:58 pm
WTJU is currently the best station I know of. A little less rock would suit me. More programs that focus on an individual would be good. I loved the Mike Seegar retrospective. There was an excellent show on Vic Chesnutt.

Tina Eshleman | July 5, 2010 12:00 pm
I would like to see some more popular music played during the day. Not heavy metal, but more indie rock. NPR has been doing a great job of spotlighting some of those artists. I do like the idea of regularly shining a light on local/Virginia performers and doing shows that would give listeners a preview and raise interest in going to see them perform.

Bob Williamson | July 5, 2010 10:59 am
This comment is more of a don't worsen the morning shows by hamstringing the dj's with playlists. They each have their own styles that work just fine....

Jenny Wyss | July 5, 2010 8:58 am
Schedule blocks - make it easier for people to know what genre they'll find when they tune in.

matthew kavanaugh | July 5, 2010 7:00 am
Well, do not introduce repetition and commercial style formats ... That is exactly why people do listen to TJU.

Diana Khachadourian | July 4, 2010 4:00 pm
KEEP IT THE WAY IT IS!!! The programming is wonderful. Odly enough, I love Opera, Jazz and Rock. The folk programming - well, not so much. Sorry, but Dar Williams singing Sea Shantys just doesn't do it for me.

Charles Choi | July 4, 2010 2:30 pm
WTJU should remain committed to independent music programming by announcers and reject proposals that move towards preset playlist programming. With online distribution, the terrestrial broadcast limitation of the 24-hour day can be broken, and the opportunity for WTJU to provide much more programming outside of music should be embraced.

Randy May | July 4, 2010 12:57 pm
The format in place has been arrived at over time and does have a continuity of its own. Criticism has been given to its unpredictability and changeability. But who is having a problem? Will more rock in the afternoon and evening gain listeners.What kind? Can giving up classical programs make it more appealing? To who? a 3wv listener? Without Rhythm and Romance will more students tune in on tuesday mornings? The product this station puts out is superior to all others in this community, difficulty will be found in trying to appease all the different tastes and opinions that are floating around now. One thing is certain, the tj lives up to its mission statement in "diverse programming" and that is its strength. Never think trading away this quality will gain you anything lasting or significant. To give up this strength for obvious weakness and homogenization is a poor strategy. Market yourself to this community and on the web to gain more like minded listeners!!

jackie kendall | July 4, 2010 12:08 pm
Keep all the formats free-form. The brilliance of TJU is the creative and eclectic nature of the station. Your Rock DJs are among the best in the country. I listen via the internet due to the dearth of even halfway decent radio in my area.

Christine buedel | July 4, 2010 11:54 am
Do not get rid of free form programming. I listen on the net because there is nothing like this where I live. Your Rock programming is cool. If you don't axe the free form rock I will donate at the next fundraiser

Jay Kardan | July 4, 2010 9:58 am
I don't believe there's much room for improvement here. All of the suggested changes seem aimed at making WTJU more like other radio stations. This is a fundamental mistake. It seems that the university is uncomfortable with its possession of a uniquely valuable jewel and wants to trade it in on something more ordinary. What makes WTJU precious is its announcers' absolute freedom to choose the music they broadcast. Even five required playlist rotation songs an hour would ruin this characteristic. Five songs represents a huge chunk of broadcast time: between 20 and 30 percent. As a listener, I don't want to hear songs from a playlist. I want to be exposed to the individual taste of the announcer.

Beth Hodsdon | July 4, 2010 9:42 am
I enjoy what I hear very much, especially the early music (Baroque and earlier), folk, blues and gospel, and mainline jazz programming (e.g., Nick at Nine, Stephascope. I don't see a need for improvement with these shows.

Marva Barnett | July 4, 2010 8:18 am
As I said, I like the electic nature of the music format. If WTJU becomes more like all the other radio stations around, why bother to tune there. I appreciate the detailed reading of program notes for jazz recordings, but I would stay tuned more if there were more music and less talking.

Mary Anna Dunn | July 4, 2010 8:18 am
Try to look within genres to figure out what in that genre appeals to people and what does not. There are particular shows I ALWAYS tune out, even though I generally like the genre. That said, please do not try to make the programming more uniform as you have been discussing. You have assumed we don't LIKE hearing a somewhat different show each day, but I LOVE That. Love Nick at Nine. Love Left of Cool. If people can remember when their favorite TV show comes on, they can remember when their favorite radio show comes on. Post the individual DJ's playlist in real time, but do not prescribe playlists. Becoming more mainstream is not going to help this station. It will hasten the demise because we already have plenty of mainstream public stations.

Dave Rogers | July 3, 2010 12:43 pm
Promote the schedule more pervasively and more effectively. Create more informative show descriptions for the public and PUBLICIZE!

Elizabeth Benzinger | July 3, 2010 10:52 am
I'll go along with whatever is decided, as long as Classical maintains a presence. It sounds as if evening classical is a thing of the past. Saturday is a day without classical music on WTJU. I do listen to jazz programs sometimes but I never turn my radio on to WTJU on Saturday.

Elizabeth | July 3, 2010 9:28 am
Increase the number of rock hours and make them at better times, when more people are listening

Don Stock | July 3, 2010 1:02 am
Arrgh, it can't be! Stop saying that!!!

Fletcher Stevens | July 3, 2010 12:12 am
I started listening to WTJU thirty plus years ago. I enjoyed hearing music I had never heard before. It was a musical education for me. Shows like professor Bebop, the bartender, got me to realize the music that influenced current acts. Try to tie the popular music with alternative forms of music.

Judith Thomas | July 2, 2010 11:31 pm
How could anyone think that repetitive programming would somehow create a better product? What a terrible idea. WTJU's eclecticism is its greatest strength, drawing as it does on the knowledge and creativity of of its DJs. I love turning on the radio and being surprised by new genres, new sounds. It's an educational experience no matter when I happen to listen. I hate the idea of pre-programming or even day-parting. If it were like the other local FM stations, I wouldn't bother listening, period.

Willian Kestler | July 2, 2010 10:22 pm
Well, I listen at any hour except between 12 and 6PM because I stopped listening to currently popular music 30 years ago. However, since you have to please multiple audiences, I don't expect that WTJU could program more jazz and classical which are my favorites.

Judy Serkes | July 2, 2010 9:50 pm
I like it just the way it is. Lots of variety.

Deborah Murray | July 2, 2010 6:39 pm
The appeal of WTJU is its unique and diverse programming, which I believe should be retained. I do agree that there could be some smoothing out of the schedule so that it is more "user friendly" to the listener, but this could be done with relatively modest changes.

Phyllis White | July 2, 2010 5:56 pm
Though mostly unemployed for 1 1/2 years I would make a pledge - as perhaps others might - if the programming only went through limited readjustments which might be beneficial.

Judith Shatin | July 2, 2010 4:11 pm
Make it all easily available via podcast so students can listen whenever.

Eric Wiland | July 2, 2010 3:32 pm
There is MUCH more room for screwing up what's good than there is for improving what's there. The quality of the format rests almost entirely upon the expertise of the volunteers. As it should be. (More rock programming wouldn't be a bad idea, either.)

Lisa Reeder | July 2, 2010 2:49 pm
Consistency among hours of the day would be easier for listeners to follow. For instance, folk programming from 10 to 2 under one banner, but with different DJs spinning each day (the title Folk and Beyond would fit, for instance). Fewer show titles to keep track of, clearer presentation of scheduling.

Jeffrey Fisher | July 2, 2010 12:54 pm
I'm not entirely sure that it could.

Mary Dykes | July 2, 2010 11:47 am
More classical music. Discussions on musical topics. Interviews with performers.

Liz Rhodes | July 2, 2010 10:09 am
Consistency and keeping all genres on the air during the day.

Aaron Margosis | July 2, 2010 1:57 am
For M-F, the blocks should be the same every day; don't have Classical at 5pm on Monday but something else on Thursday. THIS IS NOT TO SAY THAT DJS NEED TO PLAY FROM ROTATIONS. Instead of sprinkling "currents" all over the week and interrupting the flow of DJs' shows, create a new show called "WTJU Currents" during, say, M-F 4-5pm (after dumping Pacifica's "news" program). "WTJU Currents" would be the top tracks of the station, compiled by program/music directors with input from DJs. That way it becomes an identifiable, highlightable show.

Jeff Roberts | July 2, 2010 1:36 am
It doesn't need to be improved. How would you improve the format of the Tuesday Evening Concert series...use 'repetition' in the answer please?

Kendra Eshleman | July 1, 2010 7:26 pm
What makes WTJU so great is the incredible diversity on its airwaves. Whatever you do, don't turn WTJU into a bland, homogeneous station of the kind I can find anywhere on the dial.

bob cassell | July 1, 2010 5:35 pm
By letting dj's play what they want.

Gwen Loehr | July 1, 2010 12:16 pm
Keep it the way it is. Let the dj's decide what to play. That keeps it unique! That's why we love WTJU!

Scott Cohen | July 1, 2010 11:49 am
Free form is the only legitimate format for college radio today. Otherwise the station is just like any other commercial radio station. Challenging listeners the should the primary goal of the station in the same way that challenging students should be the intellectual goals of the university.

Bill Traylor | July 1, 2010 9:57 am
The parts contributed by the extraordinarily dedicated and knowledgeable cast of DJ characters have always made for a greater whole in terms of station strength and distinction.

Chris McRae | July 1, 2010 2:48 am
I don't find the current format confusing. Perhaps if more DJ's would make audio promotions for their shows, we could help our audience be less confused.

Michael Brooks | July 1, 2010 1:04 am
For one thing, don’t tell DJ’s what to play. Be programmer centric, not genre centric. Don’t focus on what music goes in what time slot, focus on the quality of the programmer. All that matters is for the programmer to be knowledgeable and entertaining. Here’s an anecdote that some WTJU alum may remember. I tuned in one night circa 1986 and heard music that was completely out of context. A DJ was playing Neil Sedaka, Burt Bacharach and like pop music in a rock slot. “Sacrilege” I cried and complained to the rock director (it may have been Brenda Dunlap at the time). I was told to be more open minded and give him a chance. I did, and it opened my horizons. This DJ understood songwriting and educated me about music I wrote off as “fluff”. The moral, great programmers make great radio and maintain listeners.

Jeff Romano | June 30, 2010 10:00 pm
It can't. The format is like no other station. It is a jewel we hold dear in this town. Don't mess with it.

Kirsten Schofield | June 30, 2010 8:36 pm
Greater consistency is key. We do rock from 2-4 M-Th, but then 12-2 on Friday. That's really confusing. "Folk" means something unrealistically broad. Rock shouldn't cede hours to folk, and the proposed "specialty" shows will only serve to further confuse listeners. There's a better way to do it than we're doing it right now, but it is most certainly NOT the proposed plan.

Katherine Perdue | June 30, 2010 8:35 pm
I love the music format of WTJU. I think it should be left alone. It's consistently varied and interesting. It's led to a number of CD purchases that I would never have found on my own. I think it's one of WTJU's greatest strengths.

James Ford | June 30, 2010 4:24 pm
The content of the programming at WTJU is not the problem; the problem is the way it's presented and promoted. Soliciting opinions from listeners and volunteers about their ideal schedule, and then deriving a compromised schedule based on that, would be far preferable than eliminating the majority of existing programming (the proposal which is currently the only one allowed at the table in our discussions thus far).

Terry Stegman | June 30, 2010 3:31 pm
When I moved here five years ago, I scanned my way through the local stations to find one that sounded like WTJU! Why would I want to change it?

Jane Foster | June 30, 2010 3:29 pm
I am happy with the classical music in the morning from 6 to 9 - it is an important part of my day. I do listen to folk music all Saturday. and Sunday evening Walking Blues, and Early Music Monday evening and Walk Right In Tuesday noon, and some evening programs now and then. In fact, my radio is tuned in only to WTJU most of the time. I would be happy to keep it just as it is.

Bill Davis | June 30, 2010 3:21 pm
I love almost all the music I hear on WTJU. And, I trust the DJs to play something interesting even within the genres I'm not as fond of. I wouldn't mind more non-music programs - poetry, commentaries, stories, puclic affairs, comedy, etc.

Elizabeth Hull | June 30, 2010 2:52 pm
Solidify Rock in the afternoons, when it can reach out into Corner and Downtown businesses. When this was the case WTJU was heard everywhere around town.

Janice Fischer | June 30, 2010 2:03 pm
My only suggestion would be to make sure the name and descriptions of the programs are accurate. Don't promise Bach, then play Scriabin.

Walt Rodney | June 30, 2010 1:34 pm
More world music.

Virginia Germino | June 30, 2010 10:26 am
Don't reduce the quirky local flavor; don't copy the trite menus of other stations, or the supporters who give most will drift away. Our announcers know more about more music than any of those worthy souls on NPR stations who struggle through repetitive, abbreviated, dumbed-down classical lists. Keep our imaginative volunteers happy.

Shana Goldin-Perschbacher | June 30, 2010 10:12 am
Please don't change the format!!!!! I shudder imagining WTJU turning into a station that sounds like WNRN. NRN may be community-funded and have no commercials, but there is nothing "local"-sounding about that station. It could be any Clear Channel station, anywhere in the country. It would be an enormous mistake to shift to a programming format more like them. You would lose your identity as a local, community-based station.

Elizabeth Rinaca | June 30, 2010 9:29 am
I like the format the way it is.

Louis Harpster | June 30, 2010 8:06 am
In many respects, I enjoy things as they are now. For my own tastes, I would increase classical and folk programming. I especial like the Saturday evening programs devoted to world music.

mary jo ayers | June 30, 2010 7:17 am
more jazz and classical offerings

Rick Mangione | June 30, 2010 2:16 am
Not possible- there cannot be any direction imposed without resulting failure

Leni Sorensen | June 29, 2010 9:44 pm
I love it just as it is - oddball, eclectic, deep, spontanious

Richard Leahy | June 29, 2010 9:38 pm
Does ANYONE really listen to "Rhythm and Romance"? Good Lord, what a bore. I also think all the rock shows (except the excellent shows dedicated to specific performers in the marathon) are entirely too ironic or affectatously cool, but maybe that's what student-run rock programming is? Isn't there any more thoughtful way of rock programming?

Laura | June 29, 2010 8:57 pm
the format is great! maybe mix up the blocks a bit, so occasionally you hear rock during the day, and classical at night.

Cafe Lady | June 29, 2010 8:54 pm
Some continuity in the M-F format is in order, but do not eliminate any department. There are too many wonderful shows in each department that would be sorely missed if they suddenly disappeared. This could negatively effect future donations.

Susanna | June 29, 2010 7:56 pm
Maybe a little less Classical, but even that has a variety and eclectic quality that is more appealing than even other public radio stations'(Gamut comes to mind). I enjoy the variety: Straight, No Chaser, Danza Latina, Professor BeBop, All That Jazz, Sunset Road, Radio Freedonia, Rhythm and Romance, Walking Blues, The Eclectic Woman Show, Soulful Situation. Maybe more Klezmer, Yiddish, vaudeville, early jazz and early blues? Maybe fewer news stories. The up and coming artists the students are learning about in Joel Rubin's Klezmer Ensemble class are compelling and entertaining.

Joyce Dudek | June 29, 2010 7:56 pm
Regular daily schedule every day. morning classical, day time folk, then jazz and rock.

Laura Leavitt | June 29, 2010 5:26 pm
It doesn't need to be "improved"

Jennifer | June 29, 2010 3:59 pm
I think that a diverse line-up of programming on a college station like WTJU is what really makes it unique. Just because a certain type of music "tests well" with some listeners, doesn't mean that it should be cause for changing the entire format.

David Soyka | June 29, 2010 1:57 pm
I think it's fine the way it is. I understand the need to perhaps better organize the schedule so certain genres consistently appear at certain times, and also perhaps that alternating DJs for a given show need to present a consistent "voice." But free-form is WTJU's brand, and it's a distinctive identity that hasn't been sufficiently marketed, particularly in the C'ville radio market where you have listeners who think WNRN or The Corner represents diverse programming.

Jim Mandell | June 29, 2010 1:31 pm
The format is not what makes it magical. It is the DJs, their passion and encyclopedic knowledge of all the world's music. As long as there is some temporal structure to the format (as there is now) so that classical, jazz, folk, and rock fans know when to tune in,it will work.

Mark Hineline | June 29, 2010 1:15 pm
It would be difficult to change the programming significantly without potentially losing committed and financially contributing listeners. Keep the format schedule consistent M-F as it is currently, with additional or different programming on the weekends, such as radio journalism or special broadcasts.

Joey Conover | June 29, 2010 12:23 pm
Less classical - that's on NPR More marathon format - intense on one type of music/musician

Adam | June 29, 2010 11:46 am
While the weekend schedule is pretty good (although Saturday afternoon/evening could be improved), there needs to be block scheduling done M-F. Perhaps something along the lines of: 3-6 am BBC 6-10 am Classical (2 hour blocks) 10-Noon Jazz Noon-1 pm Public Affairs 1-4 pm Folk 4-5 pm News (does not have to be Democracy Now, but an actual news program) 5-8 pm Jazz 8-10 pm Specialty (Soulful Situation, Reggae Vibration, Eclectic Woman, Folk & Beyond, Radio Tropicale, Professor Bebop etc...) 10 pm-3 am Rock Or something like that

wynne Stuart | June 29, 2010 11:16 am
I have thought it was good already, in that it is eclectic and lets the smart volunteers of our community range broadly in sharing their music knowledge.

Greg Raymond | June 29, 2010 11:10 am
WTJU is fine just as it is. Please do not change. I could not disagree more with the statement "Repetition is radio's strong point" That is so wrong.

Thomas and Lynda Terrill | June 29, 2010 10:15 am
In our 35 years of listening to public radio (Utah, Colorado, DC, VA), we've enjoyed every station, but WTJU is the by far the best station we've ever listened to and supported. The eclectic music format is stunning. We love how each of the announcers brings his or her own interests and knowledge to the show. The only thing that might improve the the music format is to encourage more announcers to join and so add different genres; there is room for all.

Diane Reynolds | June 29, 2010 9:44 am
I love the classical music, and Winston Barham is so knowledgeable. I have learned so much. Please do not cancel any of the classical music. I enjoy it online.

Nicole Radshaw | June 29, 2010 8:28 am
I don't think you need to improve anything. This is the only place that I can learn about ALL different types of music and not what gets paid to be played. I listen to WTJU because of the fabulous programming.

Tes Slominski | June 29, 2010 12:33 am
Maintain consistency of genre from day to day. This is already mostly in place--so that I know if I tune in online in the early evening, I know I'm going to get folk programming (for example). Within departments, listeners might appreciate knowing by time slot whether they'll be tuning in to pre-20th century 'classical' music or contemporary music, or singer-songwriter folk or 'world' music. That might be a little trickier, because there are only so many hours in a day....

Michelle Vermillion | June 28, 2010 10:46 pm
I hope that classical music programming will remain available in the morning and evening. I am unaware of any other station in the area that offers classical at these times of the day, so there's no competition. Additional classical programming into the late evening on some nights would also be nice, again, since there is no other local station offering that.

Kristin Szakos | June 28, 2010 10:00 pm
I like the eclectic nature of it now.

Pam Roland | June 28, 2010 9:45 pm
I think the variety currently offered just exemplifies the diversity of our community---which makes it so lovable and unique. While I may not listen to the Rock Marathon, I understand there are younger audiences who enjoy it and I'm willing to wait (patiently!) until their marathon is over. :)

Daniel Ehnbom | June 28, 2010 9:03 pm
I can't imagine changing it.

Neil Means | June 28, 2010 8:02 pm
The format is great. Variety and unpredictability are WTJU's strengths. Do not narrow the genres and repeat songs over and over. Repetition and predictability are the reasons I don't listen to most radio stations. And although I personally don't listen to classical, I support classical programming on TJU.

Starrie Williamson | June 28, 2010 4:00 pm
Play newer types of music such as electronic music at earlier hours.

Bill Maisannes | June 28, 2010 1:21 pm
Retain all genres. Leave conceptual space in any reformatting for cross-genre programs.

Aaron Bailey | June 28, 2010 12:25 pm
The music format at TJU is actually very good as is. The problem is that TJU isn't known as well as it should be, and that the current awesome programming isn't heard.

Vic Szabo | June 28, 2010 11:39 am
--Regulate block programming so that the same genres match the same times every day of the week. --Increase rock and classical hours, as well as specialty programming; decrease folk and jazz, which are relatively niche genres.

anne metz | June 28, 2010 11:15 am
KEEP DAYTIME ROCK PROGRAMMING!!

Nikki E | June 27, 2010 9:36 pm
I listen every day from 8:30 to 5:30, so get the full spectrum from Classical to Democracy Now. The only time I turn off WTJU at work is when the rock programming is too discordant to think straight, which is at least once a week. I would love to hear more new rock that isn't like that, but is also not on the commercial stations or WNRN. And I DO NOT want more repetition of songs and/or artists. The main reason I have listened to WTJU for 30 years (and pledged consistently for 25) is because I never hear anything overplayed.

Marcia Day Childress | June 27, 2010 8:27 pm
More classical programming. More classical programming. More classical programming. More classical programming. More classical programming. Even as other stations that broadcast to Charlottesville have curtailed their classical music offerings, WTJU should increase its classical programming. More classical programming. More classical programming. More classical programming. There's too little of it in our world. More classical programming. More classical programming. Please.

Thomas Pease | June 27, 2010 6:10 pm
Classical should be maintained throughout morning and afternoon drive, as WTJU is the only option of its kind in this area. The last thing I want when I'm in traffic is talking heads or rock. (And I'm under 40). Keep the early music program!

Sandy Snyder | June 27, 2010 5:40 pm
I agree that the block format should be more uniform so that people know what they will hear at the same time every weekday. Otherwise, the programming is already excellent. As my English teachers used to say, you cannot have "very" excellent! (but, if you could, I'd say we were already there, too).

Anne Becker | June 27, 2010 3:39 pm
WTJU's stellar roster of DJs has evolved over time (half a century!). The way to ensure continued quality is surely to continue to nurture the sometimes messy process of evolution. The music format seems just fine to me, appropriately placed around the clock...listeners who want to hear WNRN or 106.1 programming already have 2 places to go. Do we really expect people to abandon those stations for a few pop tunes here & there?

Jay hertel | June 27, 2010 1:59 pm
1) Block programming is essential. My suggestion: classical early to midmorning, folk late morning to early afternoon, rock midafternoon, jazz/blues early evening, rock late night, speciality programming primarily on the weekend. 2) All 4 departments (especially rock) need to have a consistent presence during a normal person's waking hours. 3) Having a handful of CDs for each department that are in rotation each week is reasonable, but the DJs should be able to pick which songs they play from the selected CDs. The CDs selected for rotation should be picked by a committee in each department made up primarily of DJs. The number of required cuts should not exceed 3 per hour.

Elizabeth Stark | June 27, 2010 11:46 am
-More DJ training. Consistent block scheduling. Rock either during the day or at 9. I am old and I like to sleep. -Require all DJs to volunteer their time (1-2 hours per week). -Recognize all the amazing volunteers that make the station what it is. -Rock has the most free form of all the stations formats. Maybe ask DJs to work more within genres. They should stray from the genre, but keep it more focused, like Professor Beebop. -Scheduling needs to curated better. Have the classical, jazz, folk and rock shows that segway into each other be more related.

Mark Quigg | June 26, 2010 7:19 pm
The students often offer the most uneven material. Extend shows like prof bebop and zebra show info evening. Counterprogram to NPR stations. Don't copy them

Khristina VanHall | June 26, 2010 6:58 pm
AGAIN!!! DONT SOUND LIKE EVERYONE ELSE! I am terrifed you guys will change with more "rock" and sound just like every other repetative station in this town. I ENJOY the variety, however a few comments. Move classical to earlier in the day, mornings perhaps, folk, rock and jazz in the after noon.

Bill Tetzeli | June 26, 2010 3:31 pm
On the topic of music rotation: I think Marian Anderfuren proposed a possible meeting of the minds Thursday night that got little notice. She said that the different music departments should get together regularly and each decide within themselves which artists to promote on a weekly basis and figure out how to schedule that play throughout the week. What I like about it is it puts much more of the choice of what to play back in the DJs' hands. It's a compromise, to be sure. The individual DJ loses 100% autonomy. But instead of having a record company or a music director shove a CD down a DJ's throat with no input, it allows the DJ take part in the choosing and the give and take. If another DJ's choice ends up being promoted they know that maybe next week theirs will be the preferred artist. The quality of the choices will be proportional to the participation of the individual DJ's. Is it ideal? Of course not. But no one questions the need to increase listenership. One means of increasing is to strengthen relations with record companies so they will give things such as CDs and tickets to give away, or through other forms of cooperation. Burr said several times Thursday night that he wants to avoid a quid pro quo relationship, which of course would be anathema, and that record companies would work with WTJU simply out of gratitude for being included in the rotation but without trying to dictate play. If that's true, fine. Burr's been a professional in this field for 30 years and obviously knows something about it. I would prefer there not be a rotation, period, and still hold out hope that what we'd expect in return for a rotation can be achieved by other means. But if it absolutely has to be, then let the DJ's decide it for themselves. We're a naturally curious bunch, we're eager to learn from each other and will likely come up with more interesting music if many heads and tastes are put together deciding what to play than if it's one already overworked music director.

Anthony Gallo | June 25, 2010 10:31 am
see above - consistent hours each day for programming, rock not being late at night (how does that compete with NRN and the Corner? how does that encourage students?), training for announcing

Geof Carter | June 25, 2010 6:59 am
Devote more air time to music. Air more "rock" music during daylight and evening hours. Celebrate and promote awareness of eclecticism as the sould of free-form radio. Playlists are for sheep!

Kirsten Miles | June 25, 2010 6:51 am
WTJU needs to thoughtfully craft an identity. It is quite possible that a very creative slant to the listenership could be retained, but without audience participation and polling, and greater efforts at community involvement, the music choices will be made by DJ's in a vacuum, satisfying the employees without an understanding of the listener impact. Consistency does not have to equate to restricted choices. NPR radio includes folk music, jazz and classic music, but it is possible for a patron to plan to tune in to preferred music. A plan for the music of WTJU should include the kind of polling that this survey includes, however, it is likely that greater polling questions should ask time of day of listenership, and potentially even time of preferred genre of music, in planning for station changes. A music schedule might not be as important as developing an interactive listener-response plan. I am not convinced that the area needs one more monochrome station, and further polling to identify what listeners (and perhaps campus listeners in particular?) want from a station might be prudent.

Jordan Taylor | June 25, 2010 2:39 am
I think the day-parting is essential. Every genre should have a part of the day where they expect a decent number of listeners. It needs to be consistent and EVERY DAY. It has been difficult to explain to interested people when rock programming is on during the day (well it's mon-thurs. from 2-4, but 12-2 on friday, but then 2-4 on saturday, and you know, the nights after 11).

C. Wiegand | June 25, 2010 12:07 am
DO NOT turn to programmed music. THE BEST thing about TJU, what sets it apart from all others, is the DJ's individual personalities and tastes. (Listen to the stream from Arizona!)

Andrew Pratt | June 24, 2010 10:32 pm
A regularization of hours over the course of the week would make sense (at least for M-F), but with a proper sensitivity to long-standing traditions and audiences. WTJU is the only station to have regular Classical programming between 5-9 pm (M-W), serving an important (and reliably generous) audience. Eliminating this tradition entirely will result in a significant backlash and reduction in revenue for the station. (This is fact: I have heard from many of my longtime regular listeners, who are devastated and/or outraged by the proposed switch from Classical to early evening Jazz, and have vowed that--should the change go through-- they will stop contributing to the station.) Rather than eliminate all evening Classical, the shows should be condensed into the 5-7 pm time slot across the week (M-F), with Jazz from 7-9 pm. Likewise, leave morning Jazz where it is, and afternoon Rock where it is, but *regularize* the hours across the week. The schedule does not need to be hacked to pieces with a machete, but rather molded by the scalpel of a skilled plastic surgeon.

steve vargo | June 24, 2010 6:01 pm
maybe a consistent daily 'flow' of genre...

David Lee | June 24, 2010 4:51 pm
1. Schedule a particular genre at the same time of day, M-F. 2. Have that same genre have a second M-F time slot some other time of day. This will make it easier to attract and hold DJ's because DJ's will be limited in when they can work. 3. Have each time slot not more than two hours. Three hours is too long for most DJ's to prep for each week. One and a half hours is just too short to get a groove going. 4. Don't split shows between DJ's. Consistency is better. 5. Improve DJ on-air quality. Require a signed contract re duties to station apart from announcing. Enforce rules meticulously.

U.Va. employee and music fan | June 24, 2010 4:38 pm
Let DJs continue to have autonomy but increase rock without sacrificing other genres. Every time I tune in (awake hours of 8 a.m. to 9 p.m.) there is almost never rock on air.

Increasing Revenue:

How could twice-yearly on-air fundraisers be more effective?

Davis Salisbury | July 6, 2010 1:08 pm
Hmmm. I think the 4 times a year fundraisers were actually more successful. Giving each department its own week is great to me, but if it is two-times a year I would still do it with department-led sections. The general approach of letting each DJ make an effort in their allotted timeslot does not seem very effective, but that is with the scheduling as it exists. If you change the formatting I will not be pledging most likely, so I don't have much to comment on there other than that increasing student involvement and awareness of WTJU and following through on some of the website improvements and interactive events mentioned above will improve donations more than any other changes to the bi-annual on-air fundraisers will. To be frank, if you gamble on changing the station's formatting, you may achieve a slight improvement in the on-air giving or you could fail miserably, only time would tell, but the change would be due to the format, not what you change about the fundraisers. As stated, all of the other issues are more pressing than deciding on how to change the on-air fundraisers.

Tes Slominski | June 29, 2010 12:33 am
Maintain usual programming and fundraise during it, with special shows still following the genre guidelines. Maybe this already happens, but if it doesn't, it should.

Jay hertel | June 27, 2010 1:59 pm
1) Try to get matching grants from major donors during the fundraisers. 2) Every time someone logs onto the web broadcast, they should have to listen to a brief fundraising pitch directing them to the strategically placed "donate online" button (not just during marathons). 3) The station should start working with the UVA Development Office to build an endowment and should discretely communicate with long time donors about estate planning.

steve vargo | June 24, 2010 6:01 pm
coincide them with related live concerts on UVA grounds (with a moderate admission fee to support the station)

Jessie Abbate | June 24, 2010 5:45 pm
more "how much would you save by making a PB&J sandwich for lunch - would you do it if you could donate the money to keep listening to your favorite station in cville?"

U.Va. employee and music fan | June 24, 2010 4:38 pm
Make it more fun!

What are your ideas about strategically reaching out to potential underwriters?

Nick | July 23, 2010 5:36 pm
wtju could reach more potential underwriters simply by being more aggressive and looking for partnering opportunities - and staying on top of developments in the local business world.

Daniel J Holm | July 21, 2010 7:27 pm
Buying local is in. Capitalize on that.

Brian Keena | July 20, 2010 10:52 pm
As long as WTJU does not start airing commercials. At WTJU's "underwriting" page on their website, how about including a "ballpark" figure for what it costs to be an underwriter. Day sponsorship?

James Shelton | July 19, 2010 11:30 pm
Non corporate local businesses only. This works for WRIR in Richmond. Write it into the Charter.

Bill Sublette | July 19, 2010 6:54 pm
Conduct a marketing campaign to raise awareness that WTJU reaches a very influential audience. More should be done to show potential underwriters that the station is a great way to reach opinion leaders.

Tim Ballo | July 17, 2010 9:00 pm
WTJU's four distinct genres present an opportunity to reach out to four groups of underwriters. It shouldn't be that hard to identify local businesses whose clients typically favor one of these genres and target those establishments as potential underwriters.

Anthony Kerr | July 16, 2010 8:35 pm
To increase revenue: All donations to WTJU and the athletics department should be taxed at a very small rate, perhaps 1%. The tax on donations to WTJU should be given to the athletics department and the tax on donations to the athletics department should be given to WTJU.

Peter Tschirhart | July 15, 2010 10:28 pm
Maybe take some cues from NPR. Have underwriter announcements? Underwriter days? Other than that, this is a perpetual challenge.

Thatcher Stone | July 15, 2010 9:09 am
I am an alum of the station and a contributor to the U. NO ONE HAS EVER CALLED ME AND ASKED FOR A NICKEL. You guys are doing NOTHING on fundraising, and need to go over to the Development office in the Rotunda and get some ideas. You are really, really, missing the boat here. Given the participation from UVA alumni globally, this is dereliction of duty and inexcusable.

eve schwartz | July 15, 2010 8:54 am
If you increase listenership, you will be able to recruit underwriters more easily.

Valerie L'Herrou | July 14, 2010 7:25 pm
--Talk to current underwriters for feedback --create a packet with rates based on listenership times as well as genres/specific shows. --Many businesses in cville have supported TJU for years b/c they love it. Others may never have heard of it, esp if they're new. --And, many new/small businesses may like the idea of getting their business out on the airwaves for less than it costs for commercial/NPR. This can be a selling point.

Tom Tartaglino | July 14, 2010 8:13 am
Perhaps you need a salesman.

MW | July 13, 2010 10:49 pm
What does it cost to underwrite a show? Are all genres the same? Do some time slots cost more than others? Part of our DJ training should include the economics of running the station.

Roger Clarke | July 13, 2010 4:15 am
Harness UVa's two business schools to the work of increasing the underwriting of WTJU. Specifically, create undergraduate and graduate credit-bearing internships to achieve this.

Werner K. Sensbach | July 12, 2010 11:42 pm
Use emailing and flyers for UVA affiliated households. Use the expertise of the UVA Development Office. That staff has proven its mettle in at least two highly successful campaigns. Ask incoming President Sullivan what her experience is with classical radio stations at the universities she has served before coming to UVA

Susan C Scott | July 12, 2010 10:34 pm
Do you announce underwriters' by name? For example, VA Integrative Medicine sponsors the People's Pharmacy on NPR on Saturdays, and it is reaching a lot of listeners.

Linn Harrison | July 12, 2010 6:00 pm
I don't have specific suggestions.

Toni Barskile | July 12, 2010 3:59 pm
I don't have any ideas right now. Does WTJU have a sales force?

Beth Burnam | July 12, 2010 3:25 pm
TJU is quintessentially Charlottesville; reach out to the companies that depend on that unique Charlotesville environment. Like realtors.

Virginia Daugherty | July 12, 2010 2:38 pm
Have salespeople who go out in the community like any other business representatives.

Michael Holroyd | July 12, 2010 1:48 pm
I would focus on trying to get lots of local business to donate small amounts in exchange for on-air recognition instead of trying to find someone to foot most of the bill.

Dennis DaLuiso | July 12, 2010 11:51 am
The underwriting pitch doesn't really seem like it offers competitive bene-fits. Just because it is similar in some respects to WNRN, WJMU & WVTU doesn't mean that their underwriting benefits are any better. You need to offer benefits that are exceptional in someway. Many of us would prefer to go with TJU.

Carol chandross | July 12, 2010 11:17 am
See the other letters suggesting business support.

kate nesbitt | July 12, 2010 10:39 am
How NPR stations do it? Can you copy aspects of their fundraising? Can you sell t shirts and mugs year round? I'd buy well designed stuff. Get the architecture students to design stuff for you as a short term project...

Michael Ludgate | July 12, 2010 10:14 am
You need an audience

Joan Fenton | July 12, 2010 6:53 am
I am co-chair of the Downtown Business Association of Charlottesville. . Our organization, and myself as a business person, have never been approached by anyone at WTJU to sponsor anything at the station. Again, if there were a block time for a type of music I would be far more likely to be willing to be a sponsor.

Susanna Spencer | July 11, 2010 11:42 pm
Not sure, except you seem to focus mostly as though listeners are in C'ville. I live in Madison. Think many of the suggestions others have offered are "on the money!" Also, the best way to get money is to ASK! And get your dj's and volunteers involved.

Alfreda Melvin | July 11, 2010 9:59 pm
A solid advertising/PR campaign that describes what makes WTJU unique and special, directed both at the community and the underwriters could only help. Interview the DJ's to learn what draws them to the music they play; get print in interviews, promote, promote, promote.

Peter Henderson | July 11, 2010 6:58 pm
First, maintain the qualities that make WTJU such a distinguished station. THEN, look for sponsors to whom the audience for such a station would be attractive. Students in the Commerce and Business Schools are often given real or imaginary businesses and assigned to design marketing plans for them. Why not give them WTJU as an exercise. But it should be made clear that the task is to market the wonderful station we have now, not to design a more 'marketable' station by dumbing down the programming.

Henry Wiencek | July 11, 2010 5:48 pm
Don't know.

Phyllis Binder | July 11, 2010 12:49 pm
I would think UVA money raisers would have good ideas about this and experience to go with it. Obvious targets are professors, alums and people involved in music who have financial resources.

Steve Guion | July 11, 2010 9:56 am
Not my area of expertise.

Vern Buchanan | July 11, 2010 7:59 am
If you cant reach the outside world its not in their best interest .

Aaron Zatcoff | July 10, 2010 4:20 pm
Contact businesses personally with a sort of press kit to identify the musical product we provide and benefits to the businesses and to the audiences we reach. We should be obtaining grants - we used to present a Jazz Concert Series when we had no paid staff, and we got some grants from Meet The Composer and other organizations. We should expand on that.

Prue Thorner | July 10, 2010 2:17 pm
Get financial companies in the area to be underwriters - Smith Barney, Bank of America, SNL, etc. Offer families the opportunity to have a day of their own when they are acknowledged three times during the day on a birthday, anniversary, or in honor of someone.

Tim Beeghly | July 10, 2010 1:31 pm
Promising them more visability of the station in the community. Underwriting specific months a couple of times each academic year that would have specific themes apart from the fundraisers. Having specific premium underwriters dedicated to sponsor a dept.'s fundraising show. Again, more marketing coverage of the specific marathon getting people excited about underwriting and pledging I might add.

Ruth Cross | July 10, 2010 10:48 am
Harvard airs a "commercial" between selections. I am not suggesting WTJU imitate Harvard, because WHRV lacks the unique focusing of each program on a period, instrument, etc. But I would not object to a single "message" between selections if that is what it takes to keep classical on air.

Dan Goldberg | July 10, 2010 10:18 am
Working through foundation organizations may help, I believe there are organizations that put grantors and grantees together. Possibly some public involvement with local artists may help too.

Jace Goodling | July 10, 2010 7:55 am
all it takes is an email these days, Einstein! Get creative! Come on, how angered would Thos. Jefferson be at the frustration you are facing by such a simpleton question.

Mark Greenfield | July 9, 2010 8:11 pm
Use your unique, eclectic nature to twist some arms. I am betting that your listership has more expendable cash than the typical prepneck that makes up a lot of Albemarle. Hip advertisers would understand.

Will Harvey | July 9, 2010 4:22 pm
I don't know what efforts are made now, and I don't think that pretending that a station is commercial free when there are sponsors metioned on a continuous basis makes much sense. Perhaps a plug every hour would be worthwhile to sponsors, and doing a survey of potential sponsors to find out what would be attractive to them would make sense.

Michael Sokolowski | July 8, 2010 7:00 pm
"Strategically" implies cunning or trickery. Infuse the kind of energy and passion that the best DJs have for their shows into the management and, most importantly, the community and academic presence of the station. If a local corporate entity or monied individual will consider underwriting programming if they themselves love the station. Someone is going to get their tax-deductible contribution; people love helping their community. Again, it starts with the product (which you have) and the outreach (which you really don't have).

David J. Simpson | July 8, 2010 5:41 pm
Ask them nicely and persuade them how good it would be for their image. If they are reluctant ro support one particlar type of music (in case it could offend some of their customers), let them share their contribution between different/ preferred genres.

Woody Parrish | July 8, 2010 4:57 pm
I think on-air announcements of underwriting opportunities during the shows potential sponsors are already listening to is the best way to reach them. I became an underwriter out of my enthusiasm for Reggae Vibrations. I never thought of it as effective allocation of marketing resources, but as a way to support something that has value to me. To my knowledge, I have never gotten new business as a result of being mentioned on the radio, but I have had people thank me for helping maintain something they also value.

Mary Ann | July 8, 2010 3:28 pm
Apply for grants! You need to have a business plan, articulate specific projects/programs and/or needs (e.g., new equipment/upgrades) and itemize the benefits provided and to whom they are provides (e.g., students, local community in general or specific groups). For example, look at the Annenberg Foundation (www.annenbergfoundation.org/grants_database) under the Arts, Culture and Humanities, and Civic and Community program areas. Also, check out Bank of America Philanthropic Management - Virginia area, and, if you want to try to sindicate any program, the NEA.

Ron Povich | July 8, 2010 2:19 pm
Enlist the support of student volunteers to augment the outreach already being done by staff.

Karen O'Brien | July 8, 2010 2:12 pm
NPR and PBS clearly are struggling with this too - to the point where "underwriters" are listed in such a way that it is almost like advertisements...

Marietta McCarty | July 8, 2010 11:49 am
Use a professional grant writer on staff at the University. In this town, the possibilites are endless. My guess is that many people have lacked imagination and dropped their ball to bring the station to this unnecessary crossroads.

Sheryl Hayes | July 8, 2010 9:38 am
Borrow from NPR stations: have day sponsorships

Jeff Carlin | July 8, 2010 8:44 am
I'm no marketing expert, so I can't really say, but it seems fairly simple to convince one of the many businesses that listen to WTJU regularly to underwrite a program.

Colin Campbell | July 7, 2010 10:14 pm
Better market research for different types of programming, allowing WTJU staff to go to businesses armed with information about who they'd be reaching and what businesses are most likely to target WTJU listeners effectively. Be less conservative in crafting underwriting messages - listeners don't care too much if they sound more like ads, provided they don't last long.

Sarah (A & S, 1984) | July 7, 2010 9:34 pm
I am not a business woman. Is the station in such bad financial shape that the University is no longer willing to provide this amazing community service to Charlottesville?

Valerie Matthews | July 7, 2010 8:12 pm
Possibly volunteers have connections?

ned oldham | July 7, 2010 5:09 pm
show that it is a hotbed of production creativity and an amazing living archive of musical knowledge.

Josh Krahn | July 7, 2010 4:36 pm
WTJU streams globally online. So don't limit underwriters to local business. Also sell underwriting AGGRESSIVELY. My understanding is there is a paid staff member devoted to underwriting. Are they earning their salt??

Margaret Lee | July 7, 2010 3:22 pm
Take some tips from WNRN. I truly don't know!

Peter Welch | July 7, 2010 3:17 pm
Work harder at acquiring underwriting. If getting businesses to pay for underwriting is difficult in tough economic times then barter underwriting for WTJU promotion at local businesses.

Swami Jyoti | July 7, 2010 2:38 pm
successful C'ville businesses, doctors, lawyers and others with good income

Cindy Benton-Groner | July 7, 2010 1:49 pm
Challenge the students in the McIntire School of Commerce to help you with this. Adopt day sponsors as NPR does.

Bob Girard | July 7, 2010 12:52 pm
Punch up their participation. Advertise locally to "adopt" a program. How much does it cost to be an underwriter? How is that "public" radio and WNRN can survive in this sea and this station seems to be doing an ugly self-dissolve. Apparently the school doesn't offer Sales 101. You have to offer something to have any hope of selling it.

Erika Herz | July 7, 2010 12:20 pm
Find companies that are "heart and soul" of Charlottesville like Bodos and offer very affordable sponsorship options since they don't spend on advertising.

Bridge Cox | July 7, 2010 11:10 am
unfortunately, this is where I would suggest having someone more professional come in and take care of this. I do not know the first thing about underwriting and in terms of acquiring money from the public, I feel that we could use some sort of guru/wise guy that can stray us into the right underwriting/fundraising path.

Peter Brunjes | July 7, 2010 8:49 am
You need a development person to cultivate donors and advertisers.

Rusty Trainham | July 7, 2010 12:26 am
Local businesses who tune in to WTJU during their business hours are very apt to underwrite programs, so a survey of local business listening desires might be in order. Also, businesses will underwrite the station if there is a clear return of benefit for doing so. Issuing "membership" cards to donating ilsteners with discount priviledges can steer extra customers to local businesses. This will encourage underwriting.

Becky Calvert | July 6, 2010 6:53 pm
Reach out to them?

Content Sablinsky | July 6, 2010 6:22 pm
There are difficulties here in Charlottesville. There are too many organizations chasing too few dollars. With the economy in its current condition, it's hard to suggest ways to interest potential new underwriters, but possibly some kind of large-scale fund-raising event would be effective.

Rick Kast | July 6, 2010 5:35 pm
If the current quality programming to a limited audience of musical cognoscenti is preserved it would be best to look to more philanthropic organizations, rather than businesses looking to have their underwriting recognized by a big audience.

Emily Sloan | July 6, 2010 3:28 pm
Go out there and talk to them! Have we really tried this yet?

Michaux Hood | July 6, 2010 1:51 pm
Choose to be a community radio station supported partially by UVa as an arts initiative, rather than a UVa radio station. I own a small business, who works with other small business, and I'm more likely to donate to / support such a station rather than give to a UVa oriented station, and I think many of my clients would say the same. UVa is percieved as self supporting/ not in need of our donations.

Michael D. Mabry (Law 1991) | July 6, 2010 1:24 pm
When I listen to WTJU on the Internet, I pay attention when Crutchfield is announced as a show sponsor, and I patronize them. Underwriters should know that WTJU has a national and international listenership that is obviously passionate about music and culture. I think it is pretty safe to say that there is no other radio station in Charlottesville – public or commercial – that can make that claim. There are only a handful of radio stations in America that can make that claim, and they are overwhelmingly public radio stations with independent formatting. WTJU is one of them. At least for now.

Davis Salisbury | July 6, 2010 1:08 pm
Well, this again is tricky. If you rejigger all of the formatting you are going to have to try to explain to all of the current underwriters why you have done this. Many of them will understand if it is just about money, but this will not keep them from pulling out. I don't believe many of them do it for the opportunity to get a ton of customers, they do it to support the programming and its benefit to the community. Many comments in the various forums related to the massive changes proposed bear this out. As far as general ways to increase underwriting, it is a small town. Increasing the amount of WTJU-sponsored events, and improving the website streaming capabilies, will go along way to making underwriting more attractive. I do not think the changes in programming will change much at all. Again, if students were allowed to receive credit for doing research or contributing to this cause it would help. If businesses thought that students were taking an active interest, then a new incentive would be achieved.

Brian Glover | July 6, 2010 10:45 am
I'm no good at this sort of thing. Sorry.

kay slaughter | July 6, 2010 10:03 am
Reach out to community groups such as TUESDAY EVENING CONCERT SERIES (advertise) Charlottesville-Albemarle Community Foundation (small foundations) Develop email and mailing lists.

John Dean | July 6, 2010 12:15 am
This is a difficult issue, which I know little about. WTJU is a non-commercial station, and people don't listen so that they can hear ads. Ideally, UVa would fund the station at a higher level but that is not going to happen. Are there any foundations that would provide funds to a unique station like WTJU? I do believe that if the station created a more visible presence for itself in the community, and re-captured its former place in the local music scene, that local businesses would be more attracted to the idea of underwriting. I guess what I'm saying is that the station has to re-vitalize its place in the community to make its advertising spots more valuable.

Cal Glattfelder | July 5, 2010 9:12 pm
get in touch with alumni!

Malcolm Bell | July 5, 2010 7:08 pm
If the programs are strong and concentrate on the music, I would hope that underwriters would come forward.

Sally Thomas | July 5, 2010 6:35 pm
Utilize the testimonials that this threat has provoked! This is a well-appreciated, unique gem in our midst. It isn't repetitive or mind-numbing, so the listeners are ready to pay attention to an underwriter's message, as long as the message is as well-crafted as the music. (But that requires some improvements in the writing of those messages.)

Harvey Liszt | July 5, 2010 5:55 pm
Fire all the DJ's and hire an expensive marketing consultant with a new "vision" of the station. Oh wait, you already did that.

Phil Stokes | July 5, 2010 5:38 pm
Radio is a medium in transition, it's unbearable to listen to commercial radio because of the ads. You've got to present programming that is distinctly different than any other local station. If your donors are convinced that your programming makes a cultural contribution they will continue to support it. Students and rock fans will not donate much money to a radio station no matter what you do.

Ann Benner | July 5, 2010 5:32 pm
Not my area of expertise.

Susie McRae | July 5, 2010 4:17 pm
One of the best things about underwriting at WTJU is the low cost. It might be more beneficial to the station if you got the businesses to do a better job promoting you...like a sticker for the front of a shop of business or car window. Increasing your listenership is good for both the station and potentially the business as more people hear the "ad." How about an ad on the station featuring businesses or a business that is currently ad...I mean underwriting and why they do it.

greg wichelns | July 5, 2010 4:16 pm
????????????? grants for doing something different

Zack Perdue | July 5, 2010 3:58 pm
Sadly, classical, jazz and folk are not particularly lucrative musical genres. Similarly, the music venues that feature such music are not know for their solvency (think of Gravity Lounge, Starr Hill, the Prism). I think individual contributors will be the mainstay of your financial support.

Tina Eshleman | July 5, 2010 12:00 pm
Give restaurants and retail shops an incentive to play WTJU and display WTJU flyers or bumper stickers.

Gary Westmoreland | July 5, 2010 11:47 am
Please consider having a mobile broadcast at underwriters place of business by WTJU.

Jenny Wyss | July 5, 2010 8:58 am
Identify some long-time supporters who have made larger or cumulatively larger gifts and specifically ask them for major gift support. Approach corporations not just as underwriters but also for grants through their corporate support divisions or foundations.

matthew kavanaugh | July 5, 2010 7:00 am
Hold live jazz fest, folk jams, etc. at Pavilion; do the same at the Paramount for classical

Charles Choi | July 4, 2010 2:30 pm
WTJU management should already be doing this. That this question is being placed on an open survey reflects failure by WTJU management to address this.

Randy May | July 4, 2010 12:57 pm
Maybe the underwriting department needs look at more blanket mailings to area businesses and follow up in person. Once again, if more people know about it,more will be willing to take advantage of underwriting options

Jay Kardan | July 4, 2010 9:58 am
Heightening the profile of WTJU generally (with advertising, etc.) would make it easier to solicit underwriting. Businesses would be more interested in supporting something that already has a "buzz" in the community.

Beth Hodsdon | July 4, 2010 9:42 am
As mentioned above, involve McIntyre and Darden students in maketing/underwriting projects for course credit

Marva Barnett | July 4, 2010 8:18 am
I would echo many of the excellent suggestions already offered. Why not take some cues from WTVF, which does a much better job of highlighting VT than WTJU does of highlighting UVa?

Mary Anna Dunn | July 4, 2010 8:18 am
Underwriters see this as a marketing opportunity as much as a community service. Help them identify their niche at UVA. What type of listener does their product appeal to? Find out what your listens do professionally. Get your listeners to become underwriters. Provide day sponsor opportunities for small businesses.

Dave Rogers | July 3, 2010 12:43 pm
How about creating a structure of "Friends of TJU" for a higher level donation. We would need some higher level of perks, but that could attract larger donations.

Elizabeth Benzinger | July 3, 2010 10:52 am
Person to person is surely best. I can think of several businesses I would like to approach about underwriting, but I cannot do it right now when the station itself and all classical programming seem to be in limbo.

Liz Courain | July 3, 2010 9:06 am
Not sure, but here are some questions -- Who are the natural constituents of this radio station? As students become more involved, this will lead to more underwriters, as students provide big business. Also, parents of student volunteers are potential donors.

Fletcher Stevens | July 3, 2010 12:12 am
Try to tie to university and area activities.

Willian Kestler | July 2, 2010 10:22 pm
Make the affordability of a mention cheap to start with and increase it every year. If businesses see result, the increases will hold

Phyllis White | July 2, 2010 5:56 pm
When as a UVA student I worked at the Cavalier Daily, the ads were sold on commission. Perhaps this should be done with underwriting eliminating a rather expensive position I'm sure. Back in around 1993 when I became the first paid administrator, the folks at the Development office repeatedly tried to hire me away from WTJU (they were impressed with my organizational skills and the way I reported to them) and I recall some WTJU fans in the office there. Maybe they would have some ideas also.

Eric Wiland | July 2, 2010 3:32 pm
The University should market the station to prospective students. (See below).

Lisa Reeder | July 2, 2010 2:49 pm
There is a lot of underwriting in this town -- how about UVa student organizations as underwriters? Advertises them, asks them to help drive listenership, gets them on the air.

Jeffrey Fisher | July 2, 2010 12:54 pm
You need to take an arts-humanities angle, not a professional training for work in radio angle. In my humble opinion.

Liz Rhodes | July 2, 2010 10:09 am
Go door to door, don't send emails or just ask people to come to you. Call up previous sponsors, talk to them, create relationships with businesses, go see them face to face, ask for money, tell people what they are providing for. Stop being so passive- take a hint from WNRN.

Aaron Margosis | July 2, 2010 1:57 am
Increase outreach to UVA and WTJU alumni. Expand the station's streaming capabilities (and when someone connects to the stream, start with a reminder about contributing to WTJU). Nobody has ever reached out to alumni for financial support or anything else. Everyone sees the passion unleashed by the proposed changes; station alumni are just as passionate.

Rick Friend | July 1, 2010 6:00 pm
Have the paid employees beat the street to drum up underwriters and let the volunteer DJs play what they want.

Gwen Loehr | July 1, 2010 12:16 pm
You'll find potential underwriters through these types of questionaires.

Scott Cohen | July 1, 2010 11:49 am
Free local underwriting for new businesses in the area. Welcome new businesses to the area and the airwaves with 1 year of underwriting with no strings attached. A large portion will

Chris McRae | July 1, 2010 2:48 am
I used to work in a local business and made decsions of which station(s) to support with our meagre advertising dollars. Public radio was a great option, but WTJU is much more strict than other public stations in what we can and can't say in advertising. Wish we could level the playing field here a bit.

James Ford | June 30, 2010 4:24 pm
There are tons of local business that would love to help support WTJU during the marathons; asking them to play the station in their stores or workplaces during the marathon (& providing them with schedules, bumperstickers etc for their patrons / employees) is a great gateway to increasing overall listenership and community support, and we will already have a sturdy relationship with them on which to build when we solicit underwriting from them.

Terry Stegman | June 30, 2010 3:31 pm
Again, not my area, but be careful! Remember what Tina Brown did to the New Yorker? It's never quite regained its character. Also, check out Morning Joe on MSNBC-they actually have a BAG of Starbuck's coffee sitting on the desk during the show-talk about going off the deep end with sponsorship!

Jane Foster | June 30, 2010 3:29 pm
That is something I hope the new director and the University personnel can help with - most of the volunteers are not business people and only have a few contacts with potential underwriters.

Bill Davis | June 30, 2010 3:21 pm
Initiate a campaign where listeners can plug their place of employment for a chance to win some kind of prize or premium.

Elizabeth Hull | June 30, 2010 2:52 pm
Basic salesmanship and fundraising.

Janice Fischer | June 30, 2010 2:03 pm
Do it. Also take out ads in the programs of performing arts groups.Also, it wouldn't hurt to become more of a presence on Facebook and other social networks.

Walt Rodney | June 30, 2010 1:34 pm
Create a menu and list prices in an easily seen format (on the web page). Create endowments for specific programs with long histories. Seriously.

Virginia Germino | June 30, 2010 10:26 am
Maybe the Paramount folks might have some ideas about some kind of benefit that would acquaint more newer residents who support worthwhile cultural endeavors.

Rick Mangione | June 30, 2010 2:16 am
describing the success stories of current and former volunteers

Melissa | June 29, 2010 9:40 pm
Hit up people with good taste for a single show that is relevant to their customer base. It isn't that hard. Underwriting is not that expensive and repeats the business's name over and over for an hour.

Laura | June 29, 2010 8:57 pm
setting up better levels of sponsorship, so smaller local businesses are more likely to underwrite.

Cafe Lady | June 29, 2010 8:54 pm
Hire a fundraiser - what we have isn't working.

Susanna | June 29, 2010 7:56 pm
Demonstrate how WTJU is different than the other rock and roll/pop stations that play the same songs over and over again. Keep one foot in the university world, and another in the community with your programs and DJs, as you are doing now.

Joyce Dudek | June 29, 2010 7:56 pm
Hire a fundraiser!!!!!!!!!!!

Marla Muntner | June 29, 2010 3:07 pm
demonstrate that your audience includes community members outside of UVA

David Soyka | June 29, 2010 1:57 pm
Sell, sell, sell. Underwriters need to know, if they don't already, that they are hitting multiple audiences, students, faculty, the community at large, people who have taste in music that have the taste to appreciate what the underwriters have to offer.

Mark Hineline | June 29, 2010 1:15 pm
Solicit current underwriter's to contribute artist/music suggestions for the show that they underwrite; have DJ's contact local businesses that might be willing to become underwriters- this could be a shared responsibility, taking a couple of hours per week and rotating among DJ's of each department, or the responsibility of the director of each department. Print flyers/bumper stickers/coffee mugs, etc with WTJU and the underwriter's name included.

Joey Conover | June 29, 2010 12:23 pm
I appreciate businesses supporting the radio, especially because it feels very local and makes me feel I am supporting real people. Get businesses to give a deal to listeners of WTJU, eg 5% discount at Market Street Market on March 5 if you can name a certain song or something. Add a field to this forum/WTJU website for people to fill in businesses (by category/name) they frequent to get some data. Me: Breadworks, IY, Reids, Market St Market, Main Street Market, C&O, Mas, Bizou, Himalayan Fusion, etc. Honestly, I think bigger underwriters might be more effective though. Like a big grant from some heavy hitters in Cville who like to listen to WTJU. Who knows big pockets who listen to WTJU in their car? Or employers where employees listen to WTJU at work all day? Get employees to submit to website and then solicit companies.

Adam | June 29, 2010 11:46 am
Every program on WTJU should have at least one underwriter. If potential underwriters know we have a block schedule, and each program will thematically somehow flow into the next one, then underwriters will know people will keep WTJU on throughout the day, or least likely tune in the next day at the same time.

Max Friedfeld | June 29, 2010 9:15 am
partnering with the music department to hold maybe live concerts (in old cabell) broadcasted on the air. at these events, you could also try to approach the audience about potential donations

Neil Means | June 28, 2010 8:02 pm
I'm sure more could be done to reach out to underwriters. But don't go overboard, like WNRN, which brags about "no commercials" and then has 15 minutes of underwriter promos or whatever euphemism they use.

Robyn Kells | June 28, 2010 7:32 pm
I'm going to include "donors" in that group, because WTJU's long-range development efforts have been virtually nil from what I have seen. Reaching out to alumni who gave to WTJU with station news and opportunities for input...increasing our visibility in UVa publications such as the alum assoc magazine and various schools' publications...highlighting WTJU on the music department's homepage and on the main development/campaign/fundraising pages...all these things will help strengthen revenue and create a more stable donor base, both of which will make the station more attractive to underwriters.

Bill Maisannes | June 28, 2010 1:21 pm
Identify major donors from your current annual giving pool. Solicit major gifts, not just annual pledges.

Aaron Bailey | June 28, 2010 12:25 pm
Assuring a more prominent presence around town might encourage potential underwriters to get behind your station.

Marcia Day Childress | June 27, 2010 8:27 pm
Seek donors for and write a grant to fund WTJU student internship programs, for UVA undergrads and for high school students.

Jay hertel | June 27, 2010 1:59 pm
Ask every volunteer for a list of 3 potential businesses in the area to approach about underwriting and then follow-up with each of them.

Zoe | June 27, 2010 2:23 pm
The cheapest way is to simply make announcements on-air, as WVTF does. As a business person, i need to be reminded! This is another thing that students can do: market research, then direct targeting of businesses that cater to the markets of different shows.

Elizabeth Stark | June 27, 2010 11:46 am
-First, increase listenership. Students are a huge part of the listening community, and can provide valuable sets of ears to up number of listeners. -Next, improve website, and online presence. This gives TJU a better "brand." Define the station in the ways it is different form other local stations. -Contact local businesses that appeal to the university community and cultural institutions.

Khristina VanHall | June 26, 2010 6:58 pm
This is where student in the business school can help greatly. Have those students work on projects to help find and reach underwriters. Its great experience and great resume fodder.

Jordan Taylor | June 25, 2010 2:39 am
I hate to point out that most every business in town knows and is annoyed by Mike Friend's WNRN. He CAMPS OUT until they will buy 1000 bucks of underwriting just to get him out of the place. I have heard this from at least four businesses. It might not seem like a page out of Dale Carnegie but it gets underwriting.

Stuart Gilchrist | June 24, 2010 6:23 pm
see above

Jessie Abbate | June 24, 2010 5:45 pm
show-specific advertising?

David Lee | June 24, 2010 4:51 pm
Aggressively go after more underwriters.

U.Va. employee and music fan | June 24, 2010 4:38 pm
Talk to businesses that listeners probably would support. Record stores for rock shows, restaurants for jazz shows, etc.

Additional Comments:

Rose Ann | July 23, 2010 6:30 pm
If you remove - please, no - or reduce your classical/opera/vocal, our contributions will be decreased or will disappear accordingly. Again, there's nothing quite like WTJU.

artlover | July 23, 2010 6:05 pm
The announcers' plan is on the table, and the new station managers' plan is shelved --a just tribute to cooperative planning and collegiality. But what is this surviving mandate for the new General Manager to "freshen, sharpen and focus the content"? That language as vague, shifting and slick as this survives from the shelved plan serves to continue the OPA's/GM's aggressive agenda to first pursue music-content changes before first implementing marketing/fundraising/back office changes. Imposing freshen-sharpen-focus techniques upon music programming could give WTJU a loud, fast, garish, slick gloss --a grotesque aesthetic and a false setting that would inevitably cheapen the integrity and devotion of the dj-specialists' work, and drive away listeners. But it could be applied with success to a new Journalism Desk initiative that might model itself upon the exemplary "Democracy Now" format or perhaps the example of the BBC's "Interview", "Assignment", or "From Our Correspondent" programs. It's been long clear that WTJU needs to expand its long-form journalism efforts. Currently, participation in the production of the "Virginia News" program is nonsensically restricted to students only, and the end-product all too often suffers from their overcommitted schedules: pre-packaged, formulaic, lacking relevance, non-critical, shallow. The very finest short journalism programs at WTJU were done by Bess Murray and by Dona Hildebrand, and their models should be followed, going forward. "The Crank of Dawn" is legend, and an enduring model. The Theatre Department (and regional theatres) should embark upon a programme of classic radio theatre, to be aired regularly. These word-based realms are inherently fresh, sharp, focused --not slick, rote, 'branded'. They increase participation, relevancy and learning. The longforms can be immediately slotted into currently off-air or slick-shallow-BBC overnight hours. A word regarding the current PSA in-house talent: substance: B-; style: C-. Please 'focus' and 'freshen' there.

ifmusicbethefoodoflove | July 23, 2010 4:30 pm
Fundraisers can be made more productive by 1)increasing the currently very narrow web listenership (currently severely constrained by low bandwidth and little or no podcast capabilities) by a factor of 50 to 100, by building-out a sophisticated archiving/podcasting capability; 2) small, targeted ad buys in music trade magazines and websites/websearch results; 3) ad buys in the local alternative newspapers; 4) remote-broadcast events around the University and community; 5) install a yearly $1-$2 'arts investment' check-off for all students' Arts Dollars, to go to WTJU; 6) initiate on-grounds WTJU dj-ed dance-parties with Arts Dollars admission; 7) increase students' Arts Dollars allotments; 8) create a fee-based WTJU DeeJay-ing service composed of members from all four music departments; 9) the on-air fundraising marathon could mirror the normal schedule, but the four departments could compete in a friendly and spirited way for the highest totals; 10) aggressively institute a "text-your-donation" function into each marathon; 11) elevate the aesthetic desirability of the marathon t-shirt; 12) in exchange for a donation, give the donor a certain number of 'virtual votes' that he/she may then cast for his/her favorite shows via web/texting, etc.; 13) have each of WTJU's four music departments caucus yearly to place the name (or two) of a dj in nomination for paid slots in the 'first-year short course program'; 14) by the same process, have dj's regularly nominated to create a 50 minute lecture/music lesson and/or a 70 minute lecture/music lesson, and make these available through relevant academic departments of the College and through the School of Continuing Education.

Katherine Greiner | July 23, 2010 3:52 pm
I've written in with my comments before, but I just want to say I am listening to my favorite WTJU show-- Reggae Vibrations-- and am so happy to be enjoying the music that keeps me listening to WTJU and to hear mention that Pete Marshall is back. It feels like management is being responsive to comments made at the public meeting, and I'm feeling appreciative. Thank you!

Christopher Javor | July 23, 2010 2:54 pm
I have lived here for twenty seven years and listened to WTJU regularly to the programming I like. At times I have listened to other programs and find that I get an education...even the programs I normally listen to the same happens. I feel the volunteers have a passion for what they play no matter what the genre and in playing their favorite music it means something to them and they are sharing themselves. I am sure there needs to be changes, but I am so habituated to the station as it is it seems all right to me. I feel that it is unique in how it is and I definitely would not like to see the diversity which it presents to be inhibited.

Katie Vogel | July 23, 2010 1:19 pm
I have grown up with WTJU and still listen in even though I no longer live in Charlottesville. The reason I love it is because it's nothing like other stations I've heard...I love the variety, the djs are so sincere in their love for what they're playing, etc. I understand the need for progress, but I would be really upset to see the entire format and mission of WTJU to change. I support the extension to students because I think they're are students would love WTJU...but just because WTJU wants to reach out to students doesn't mean it has to change it's format. I think a lot of UVA students would like the variety of music on WTJU. Offering internships is something that will grab students attention...the chance to be in a studio, get to know the equipment, getting to guest dj.

stevie jay | July 23, 2010 12:21 pm
Please keep the music format the same as it's been for a long, long time. Our world is suffering with the process of STREAMLINING everything--removing the creative, human element, buffing out the "rough" edges. WTJU's most outstanding feature has always been its eclectic tastes and styles provided by its DJs. The recent proposal to change over to standard rotations and to otherwise start controling the programming was cause for alarm amongst thousands of Charlottesvillians who LOVE WTJU THE WAY IT IS! Please, PLEASE don't start fixing something that isn't broken, my friends! PLEASE! WTJU is a gem, complete with all its colors and textures and quirkiness--and frankly, we need more of that kind of diversity EVERYWHERE these days. We're all drowning in a sea of American Idol--we don't need any more slickness. Thank you, thank you!! Stevie Jay

Scott Pettis | July 23, 2010 11:57 am
People still remember and discuss the quality of college radio stations from even 25 years ago (e.g., WGTB) that produced quality jazz, rock, folk, and classical. Isn't that what you want for your station?

listenersince72 | July 23, 2010 12:49 am
It's plain that WTJU's budgetary gap can be drawn towards closure without resorting to any large format changes, by implementing the ideas gathered in this forum. We are given to understand that WTJU is a $360,000-a-year operation, this large figure having been accumulated in just the last several years as several paid positions have been added. But can't interns perform much or all of, say, the Public Service Announcements position? And do so with comparable or enhanced outcomes? Must the General Manager/Station Director position of an all-volunteer station be quite so highly remunerative? Couldn't the Business Manager position be similarly trimmed and the function bolstered with interns? Such changes could bring the yearly station cost down by $50,000 or more -- a savings that would go far in closing the yearly gap. All of WTJU's stellar features -- volunteer dj's with unexcelled enthusiasm and knowledge, a well-maintained music library vastly enhanced by dj's personal collections, minimal but sonically quite good equipment, a lean but quite functional facility -- such stellar qualities go chronically underfunded even as these 'competitively' paid positions have mushroomed in the last half-decade or so. Which would be worse? That a review acknowledges that the paid positions are not optimally or sustainably sized, or that the intellectual and cultural heritage of the station -- it's music, beauty, and diversity -- is torn asunder in a miserable quest to 1)pay these salaries and 2)'break even'?

Scott Shisler | July 22, 2010 6:29 pm
As someone sagely mentioned, some time ago... most of the questions here reflect the inadequacy of promoting the unique qualities that WTJU has possessed for decades. A wake-up call should have been when the microbursts silenced the broadcasts, weeks ago: what would life in CVille be like without this radio station? Untenable, that's what. Radio is immediate, and local. 24/7, the volunteers that keep the music and information alive never cease to educate, entertain, and amaze. That's why I listen... and find television less-and-less necessary.

James Shelton | July 22, 2010 12:53 pm
[phone] Discovered WTJU a few months ago and listens whenever he's in Cville. It's a unique offering - he'd be disappointed if it changed to "payola" top-40 programming - there's already too much of it. Keep the community DJs choosing the music, and continue encouraging involvement of community artists.

Diane Fiery | July 22, 2010 12:45 pm
[phone] Couldn't have lived in Albemarle Co. for 50 years without WTJU, especially classical programming. UVA should retain its multi-genre station - it's phenomenal. Please don't change anything.

Kate | July 22, 2010 12:35 pm
[phone] Has enjoyed WTJU for many years, especially classical music - don't lose it!

Kat Gursky | July 22, 2010 12:33 pm
[phone] Has enjoyed classical programming on WTJU for 20 years. Likes classical during drive time and especially enjoys Just a Few Friends, Early Music Show, and Mitchell with Music. UVA should offer cultural experience and retail WTJU's classical programming as the roots of culture.

Cordelia Plunkett | July 22, 2010 12:28 pm
[phone] Fan of classical music programs. Shocked to hear WTJU was considering doing away with classical altogether and wishes to express support for its continuation.

Philip Stafford | July 21, 2010 3:54 pm
I am a graduate of the University and resident of Charlottesville. In my opinion, WTJU is one of the very few activities where the University makes a conscious effort to provide something of value to the community. For the most part I see UVA taking advantage of the community and giving very little back. I am not interested in more UVA sports - they are a negative influence on our town. Whereas WTJU provides positive influence, culture, and life to our town.

George | July 21, 2010 2:11 pm
For such an eclectic city, Charlottesville has become well known for having a major void in it's lack of a decent radio station. WTJU has a wide open market to take advantage of. We are talking about the music. There is so much music being produced and yet the Charlottesville air waves are all about commercialism, except WTJU which is it's own special station that caters to a fraction of the potential audience.

Brian Keena | July 20, 2010 10:52 pm
WTJU is one of the reasons we moved to the Charlottesville area in '95, chosing it over Lynchburg or Lexington. Having multi-formatted programming is very out-of-the-box and (unfortunately) a rarity. The area does not need another Americana, NPR, Classic Rock or Soft Rock/Contemporary station. We don't need to sound like everyplace else. WTJU is the voice, for so many, of this unique town. Please don't mess with the programming! Let's focus our efforts on marketing, increasing student involvement and fundraising. Thank you.

James Shelton | July 19, 2010 11:30 pm
Thanks for having great radio in Charlottesville.

Bill Sublette | July 19, 2010 6:54 pm
Whatever you do, stay true to the station's core culture and brand. An essential element of the brand is that this is a place on the dial where you can expect the unexpected.

Mike Wright | July 19, 2010 5:25 pm
I did not answer the specific questions above as I am mostly in agreement with the announcers' plan on these topics, and have nothing further to add to many of the good ideas expressed already. As a former WTJU listener, contributor & DJ, I do want to express my opinion: Please stay true to the first 2 bullets of the station's mission statement, and the 50+ year "free-form" legacy which I believe enables their realization. The station needs to be financially viable, and I believe it can be by exploring many of the good ideas proposed here; however, if playlists, rotations, and automated programming are required to do so, then I for one would say "may WTJU rest in peace". Thanks for soliciting input and trying to keep WTJU alive and vibrant; I am hopefully that it will be a successful effort.

anna magee | July 19, 2010 9:37 am
WTJU is an incredible asset to the Charlottesville community. To have such a broad range of programs streaming out daily with high quality music is something I would hate to lose. Radio has, for the most part, become filled with commerciials and really bland music. In this desert of cultured listening, WTJU is a radio-oasis (along with Radio IQ). Keep up the good work!

William Hale | July 19, 2010 7:27 am
I have regularly contributed several hundred dollars to WTJU over the course of each year, far more than I contribute to any other media or other non-profit other than my church. Without WTJU my life would be much poorer, but I realize that we probably cannot sustain the station by being proudly "wierd." The question is how much of the wonderfully "abnormal" quality needs to go in order to be more palatable to a larger audience, and a larger audience is probably inevitable if we are to survive, unless a student/educational imperative is found. Again, I think a much more streamlined and easily understood schedule would be most helpful in this goal. Thanks for all your good work. William Hale

Neil Means | July 18, 2010 12:03 pm
Maybe you already do this, but the real market value of services provided by volunteers should be tracked and included in your accounting. That is, the salaries, benefits, taxes, insurance, etc that it would take to operate with all professionals should be included in the operating budget costs. And the same figures should be included on the revenue side as in-kind donations by the volunteers. Unfortunately, in our world, if a value is not expressed in dollars, it tends to be overlooked. And some funding sources may allow those in-kind donations to be used as matching funds.

Tim Ballo | July 17, 2010 9:00 pm
Others have said it far more eloquently than I can, but WTJU was extremely important to my development as a music listener, a musician, and a person. I heard music on WTJU that was unlike anything I had heard in my life to that point, and I doubt I would ever have given such music a chance without its loving presentation by WTJU's dedicated volunteers (leaving aside the impossibility of ever finding such a broad spectrum of sounds on my own). WTJU was a factor in my decision to live in C'ville after graduation, and I can't even imagine the city and the university without the station's freedom and character intact. Rather than abandoning what makes WTJU special, the University needs to recognize and capitalize on the station's true strength: the dedication and depth of musical knowledge of its volunteer staff.

richard f. jones | July 17, 2010 11:01 am
THE CURRENT MIX IS IMPRESSIVE AND QUITE VARIED. I MOVED HERE IN 1972 TO ATTEND GRAD SCHOOL. I WAS AN AVID LISTENER OF JONATHAN SWARTZ IN MANHATTAN WHO DID NOT PLAY FROM A CORPORATE PLAY LIST. I HAVE CONTINUED TO LISTEN TO TJU PRECISELY BECAUSE EACH DJ PLAYS HIS/ HER CHOICES. WHAT A WEALTH OF PLEASANT SURPRISES EVERY DAY!

Anthony Kerr | July 16, 2010 8:52 pm
I strongly support WTJU's current classical music programming. Ever since one of the local NPR stations discontinued its excellent classical music program because it could no longer afford to buy it from NPR, WTJU has been the only source of serious classical music in Charlottesville. Please don't let UVA and Charlottesville become a musical desert -- keep the current classical program in place. (Yes, the other NPR station has some classical music, but a rather wishy-washy selection.)

Anthony Kerr | July 16, 2010 8:52 pm
I strongly support WTJU's current classical music programming. Ever since one of the local NPR stations discontinued its excellent classical music program because it could no longer afford to buy it from NPR, WTJU has been the only source of serious classical music in Charlottesville. Please don't let UVA and Charlottesville become a musical desert -- keep the current classical program in place. (Yes, the other NPR station has some classical music, but a rather wishy-washy selection.)

jeanne.tabscott | July 16, 2010 6:42 pm
Were it not for the classical programming weekday mornings, three evenings, Sunday, and Sunday morning Gospel music, I would not be a TJU listener. I enjoy jazz and BBC news at times too. The opportunity to tune in when other stations are too full of talk, talk, talk is most welcome. I appreceiate the current programing; its variety and time slots work for me. I hope any changes will not eliminate at least the morning classical music. Not being familiar with the UVA campus scene and curriculum, I cannot comment on ways to engage students as listeners and participants, though the many responses you have received contain lots of ideas to explore.

Peter Tschirhart | July 15, 2010 10:28 pm
The more you make participation competitive and (as they say about living on the Lawn) an "honor," the more I think WTJU will be a success.

Tufara Waller Muhammad | July 15, 2010 2:18 pm
I  first started listening to WTJU a while ago when I was traveling throughout the southeast.  Now, I listen online all the time to WTJU. I truly love the  diversity of the formatting of WTJU. I recently was told that there are going to be some changes to the format and programming of the station. I have always felt like WTJU was the voice of the people. Please don't change the format. I don't live in Charlottesville, but I'm listening online.  Please keep WTJU 'Free Form.'

Thatcher Stone | July 15, 2010 9:09 am
What about an alumni weekend? I spent three years volunteering at the station and loved every minute of it. I can now talk to anyone, anyplace, about anything, and get a laugh, courtesy of those years, including Ronald Reagan in a bathroom on the campaign trail in 1979. You need to CAPITALIZE on these positive feelings. I have not gotten a single mailing from WTJU since I graduated. THAT"S INEXCUSABLE. 32 Years!!!!!!!!

Marybeth Collins | July 15, 2010 12:15 am
Give more kudos to the deejays at WTJU who create their own playlists and educate the public from their own personal experience. As stated above, they are a treasure trove of musical knowledge, wisdom and insight and, as recent weeks have demonstrated, responsible for making WTJU into a real jewel of a radio station in this community. In my opinion, they are not shown enough appreciation.

Valerie L'Herrou | July 14, 2010 7:25 pm
--TJU has a dedicated audience. The station may have been languishing a little lately, but that's true of radio overall. Buffing up its brand, and making it easier to find--rather than whacking it into another shape that will cause it to lose its existing listenership--is what's needed. --I almost never listen to WNRN. I can't stand the repetition, the compression, or the commercials (that's what they are). I won't listen if WTJU becomes NRN-lite.

Tom Tartaglino | July 14, 2010 8:13 am
I am an artist and a loyal listener. WTJU is a place where I go to enjoy artfull music. There really isn't anyplace else. If you start play lists and commercialization you will loose me and my friends. Don't you realize what you have? Should mankind let a great whale go extinct because of demographics.

Art Thomas | July 14, 2010 7:21 am
At the town hall meeting there was a man who claimed to represent someone who wanted to purchase the radio station and leave it in its free-form format. He spoke in an off putting way, but we should learn more about this person's intentions. We should remain skeptical of Burr et al.despite their sincere intentions. Their salaries are paid by the university and the university owns the license and has the power to shut down or radically change the format of this station no matter how many of us object. It seems obvious that WTJU is a low priority concern for those who run UVa and probably always will be. Can the station really compete in importance to athletics, the med, business or engineering schools? When the cuts continue to come as this economy continues to tank, WTJU must be in the easily expendable category. And though the public affairs person says the station is not for sale, it very well may be if this economy continues to worsen. In any case the purchase of the station by an individual or a group of individuals who are devoted to this station and its unique format ought to be considered. If three former DJ's can travel 200 miles to inform the town hall meeting that they contacted 70 alumni and raised $20,000, then much is possible. In the right private hands, WTJU could raise its own money and secure its own future rather than being a political football and a small fish in a very large pond. It would have its own pond with its own uncertainties and problems and could still could be a part of campus life and Charlottesville. There is something uplifting and quite satisfying in the knowledge that every penny you receive comes from people who see value in what you offer and give of their own free choice. You can't say that about funds from the CPB or UVa as these funds -taxes- were forcibly taken from all of us. And whether any of us want to give or not, choice and consent are tragically missing from this equation. And what is the soul of WTJU if it is not free choice?

Ginny Chilton | July 13, 2010 8:39 pm
I think it's important to involve more students. That said, I want to remind the station of its objectives, quoting directly: "to present original, rich, and diverse programming of music and other forms of expression free from the direct constraints of commercial interests, reflecting the broadest educational goals of the University," and, "To provide the University and surrounding communities with a significant alternative to other broadcast media within the station's service area." Let's be sure that, in our effort to improve the station, we don't sacrifice our objectives.

Jocelyn Pace | July 13, 2010 7:52 pm
During the day, I tune into WTJU only after being turned off by whatever song/show is on WNRN or The Corner. If WTJU were more actively playing something different, something I never hear on the radio, something not boring, I'd make WTJU my primary station. Too often this dial change happens when WTJU is playing jazz. And I quickly move on. I don't listen to jazz, especially when I'm in the car and need to stay awake.

Kenny | July 13, 2010 6:49 pm
I've commented once, but it occurs to me to add a note about the educational function of the station. I owe my knowledge of and interest in classical music of all sorts to my college radio station, years ago. I arrived at college knowing little music beyond (stone-age, given the era) rock and folk. But the music made available to me by my college radio station--in such then-obscure-to-me areas as early music, chamber music, lieder, opera, 20th-century compositions--fed and nourished my general hunger for knowledge, an appetite I suspect is not uncommon among people of college age. Is it not possible that the alternatives to the most familiar, popular contemporary music currently offered by WTJU might be serving a similar function for UVA students?

Nancy McAdams | July 13, 2010 5:17 pm
[phone] has been listening to WTJU for 11 years and supports the station financially; would hate to see any genre done away with, especially classical and jazz; please keep balanced programming, and no talk shows!

Henry Frasier | July 13, 2010 5:15 pm
[phone] wife and he love classical music and follow it around the radio dial - starting the day with WTJU - and listen to classical via the internet when local broadcasts not available; suggests station could be a repeater for a classical station in Wake Forest NC if UVA ever wants to sell WTJU.

Jimbo Cary | July 13, 2010 5:08 pm
[phone] was at town hall meeting on Monday night and is concerned that so much stock is put into Arbitron ratings when they are based on the listening habits of only 150 people.

Chris Rigby | July 13, 2010 5:04 pm
[phone] supports continuing classical programming; listens to old-time folk as well.

Angela Andrews | July 13, 2010 5:02 pm
[phone] "Dear University of Virginia: Please find a way to keep WTJU going forever the way it is."

Snowden Hall | July 13, 2010 4:59 pm
[phone] enjoys classical programming; please don't change the lineup too much; enjoys world music as well.

Jean Brandis | July 13, 2010 4:58 pm
[phone] please keep morning and evening classical programming alive - it's hard to find anywhere else!

James Overton | July 13, 2010 4:56 pm
[phone] UVA has of late become money-driven; implores UVA to recognize the artistic merit of WTJU - it's appreciated and respected nationally; let it be a reminder of how things used to be at UVA.

C. Garges | July 13, 2010 10:10 am
I have listened to the classical side of your program for 10 years. The volunteers do a great job in promoting understanding of classical music. Students need the peacefulness of classical music even though they may not realize it. Having it available leads to exposure. Please keep the classical part of your program.

Helen Marr | July 13, 2010 8:58 am
I listen to WTJU every day of the week and I have supported the station every year since I moved here in 2002. As an ethnomusicoloist/folklorist,I find it offers a rich array of music that does not exist on any other area radio station. The DJ's for Jazz & Folk & World Music are passionate, knowledgeable, dedicated; they add immeasurably to the listener's experience (i.e. The Rum Cove/"Soulful Situation" or Kevin Donleavy/"Atlantic Weekly" (not sure if that's the correct name of his show). WTJU is a treasure. Our community would be much the poorer if it becomes homogenized/mainstreamed.

Roger Clarke | July 13, 2010 4:15 am
WTJU can do well financially without changing its free-form format. Rather, the current format will succeed by further marketing efforts. It is a grievous mistake to propose to take a slash-and-burn approach to this great University Community resource. This undeserved threat of dismantling has been sudden and unannounced, even surreptitious. Let OPA, the new GM of WTJU, and other UVa administrative actors undertake, going forward, to further build WTJU rather than tear it down. First, let OPA's administrators continue the period of input and discussion regarding WTJU through the end of August, or longer. Secondly, let the incoming UVa administration become properly oriented, and then be permitted to become fully informed and able to consider the matter appropriately. Let OPA acknowlege its errors, and apologize to WTJU. Let the administration work with and not against WTJU. Let WTJU be given time to show that it can begin to substantially and rapidly close its deficit before format changes are considered. There are many ways to increase student involvement, increase listenership, and increase revenues. Let them be tried.

Don Harrison | July 12, 2010 11:58 pm
I support the Announcer's Plan.

Werner K. Sensbach | July 12, 2010 11:42 pm
During the meeting at Zehmer Hall on July 12, 2010, WTJU gave many convincing reasons why this student run radio station should be kept going. Those who question its need and viability are not unfeeling philistines, but responsible circumspect administrators, board members and alumni who watch out for fiscal responsibility and keep an eye on the bottom line. We may remember that Thomas Jefferson had his troubles with the VA Legislature who questioned his fanciful designs for the University Grounds. When James Madison presented the final plans to the Legislative Committee, he apparently grew tired of explaining the design and simply stated:"Mr. Jefferson wants it that way!" Thomas Jefferson loved classical music and enjoyed playing the violin in trios with his wife Martha and Baron v. Geismar, a Hessian Army officer who, imprisoned in the Hessian camp at Barracks Road,was nevertheless a frequent guest at Monticello and made a gift of "all my music"to Jefferson when he finally was returned to Germany. If we ask why do we need music, why do we need jazz, why do we need classical tunes, why do we need WTJU, one wishes for someone to stand up and say:"Mr Jefferson would have wanted it that way!"

peter griffin | July 12, 2010 10:27 pm
I HAVE CONTRIBUTED REGULARLY TO WTJU. IF THE FORMAT IS CHANGED AND THERE IS A LARGE TURNOVER OF DJ'S I WILL NOT CONTRIBUTE FURTHER.

Linn Harrison | July 12, 2010 6:00 pm
I hope that the station management and university administration will recognize the unique resource that TJU represents, and not destroy it in the process of dealing with the fiscal issues.

Rita Seale | July 12, 2010 5:17 pm
Finding the classical music I like/when* I like it has not been a problem. *In the evenings. I do hope there are folks around who can offer helpful suggestions. Student involvement seems very necessary - also a more **forceful** plea for funds during the fund-raisers. One positive outcome for the recent publicity may be increased financial support. When we first came to C'ville 52(!!) years ago, WTJU was the ONLY station playing classical music. The FM station aired baseball games. Good Luck, 'TJU.

Beth Burnam | July 12, 2010 3:25 pm
It frightens me to think WTJU might close down as there have been times in the last 20 years when it's the only thing clearly keeping me in this part of the country. It's an underutilized resource for the University, the students, and the surrounding communities but that could be changed if just some of the great ideas on this forum were introduced.

Rob Sheffield | July 12, 2010 3:05 pm
WTJU is a uniquely eclectic mix of different music styles, but that doesn't detract from its identity. That IS its identity, and that's what makes it the University's most valuable cultural asset. It serves as the University's liasion to the outside world, and really should be celebrated as such.

Virginia Daugherty | July 12, 2010 2:38 pm
I support the Volunteer Announcers Plan. Please do not change the format until you implement a plan for better promotion and advertisement of WTJU.

Keith Alnwick | July 12, 2010 2:31 pm
Radio should be filled with meaningful rituals and traditions and a healthy dose of the unknown. If you can nurture both sides of the equation - on the one hand, a stable and diverse programming schedule, on the other, live events and continued freedom of expression - WTJU is living up to its mission and is worthy of the money being spent to maintain it.

David Sariti | July 12, 2010 12:34 pm
Compared to the classical music programming on WTJU, comparable programming on other local stations downright smacks of Top 40 radio. Keep the great programming!

Sam Freilich | July 12, 2010 12:27 pm
[phone] don't change programming; the public radio stations have begun to sound the same - keep WTJU unique.

Claire Mellow | July 12, 2010 12:24 pm
[phone] doesn't watch TV, listens every day to classical, jazz and rock; agrees with presenting each genre at the same time each day.

Peter Hedlund | July 12, 2010 12:22 pm
Better digital presence: improve website, develop Mobile app. More local news/feature programming.

Jane Alexander Carr | July 12, 2010 12:21 pm
[phone] please don't eliminate classical programming.

Carolyn Silver | July 12, 2010 12:15 pm
[phone] why would anyone want to change WTJU's programming?; like everything exactly as it is.

Sarah Hembley | July 12, 2010 12:13 pm
[phone] passionate supporter of classical and may other shows; would be very unhappy with any change!

Carol Chandross | July 12, 2010 12:07 pm
[phone] please keep classical programming.

Marsha Frick | July 12, 2010 12:05 pm
[phone] dismayed to hear that program changes are being considered; morning classical and Sunday opera are the best -- add more.

Eric McKenzie | July 12, 2010 12:02 pm
[phone] Has been going to UVA's Tuesday Evening Concerts for years; classical is all he listens to.

Lynn Hedlund | July 12, 2010 12:02 pm
It is laudable to try and include more students in the operation/programming of WTJU, but to change the music format would be giving up on independent radio and then WTJU would have no soul.

Thad Gerry | July 12, 2010 11:59 am
[phone] 30-year listener; mission statement doesn't say anything about generating revenue; volunteers are the best station asset; get students to raise funds through advice from Business School.

Dennis DaLuiso | July 12, 2010 11:51 am
You might consider offering academic credit for station work by students in the theatre and radio production curricula, as does WJMU.

Carol chandross | July 12, 2010 11:17 am
Best wishes tonight for a good turnout. Unfortunately I can't be there. But don't do anything rash and above all keep classical music.

Kate Nesbitt | July 12, 2010 11:17 am
Wait for the students to return.

kate nesbitt | July 12, 2010 10:39 am
I love WTJU and will pledge $50 if you leave the station format substantially alone. Yours, Kate Nesbitt

Michael Ludgate | July 12, 2010 10:14 am
I have been in the radio business all my life. Even have a degree in Broadcast/Marketing from Syracuse University. I was instrumental in creating 3WV so I have some experience to draw on.

Kenny | July 12, 2010 9:33 am
I have relied on WTJU's classical programming for 35 years--and I'm embarrassed to admit that I have not yet contributed financially, though the current crisis is causing me to see the error of my ways, and I vow to change! I was also unaware, until reading this morning's Daily Progress article, that the projected change included eliminating classical music entirely! No other station provides classical programming like WTJU's, including its emphases on vocal and operatic music, chamber music, etc., presented by knowledgeable announcers. Perhaps the loss of my listenership (especially given its previously non-paying status!) doesn't matter to the powers that be; on the other hand, I wonder how many like me are out there in the community.

Terri Long | July 12, 2010 8:57 am
I have such great affection for every bit of WTJU! I learn so much from the DJs and welcome the varied programming and familiar voices each time I tune in, which is every day. Please do not distort this unique sound choice. I am listening, do not disturb.

Carla Arton | July 12, 2010 7:41 am
Better reception distance.

David Callihan | July 12, 2010 7:13 am
Keep the Grateful Dead and Phriends show...but integrate this type of music into normal everyday programming along with the suggestions above.

Martin Schwartz | July 12, 2010 6:55 am
WTJU is the now only station that plays classical music in our area. Classical is the main reason I listen. Lose the classical and you will lose me.

Joan Fenton | July 12, 2010 6:53 am
The station has great potential that has yet to be met. I worked as a student at WXPN in Phila, and it was the best part of my college experience, and afterwards hosted traditional music radio shows for over 15 years. In grad school, when WUNC went on air, I started a show that still airs weekly. I think you need to have a program in place that allows students to have air time.

Mike Krueger | July 12, 2010 2:27 am
UVA has no business being in the radio business. Its station should be not only technically non-commercial but philosophically non-commercial. Simply a resource for ordinary community members to share their love and knowledge of music with others. It should contribute to the traditional role of a university in providing a haven for marginal culture while also making that culture freely available to all, with the understanding that the larger society is thereby enriched. It should do what it does well and not try to do what others do better. It is an excellent institution, don't screw it up.

Susanna Spencer | July 11, 2010 11:42 pm
The creativity and uniqueness of the programming is your biggest selling point! Please, please don't become just like most stations. we have enough of those as it is. I don't even understand why someone would think that's the option you should take.

Alfreda Melvin | July 11, 2010 9:59 pm
I urge caution with regard to changing too much too fast! Some things, once broken, can never be repaired.

Peter Henderson | July 11, 2010 6:58 pm
I am sad that this station which has been so distinguished for so many years has been found wanting because donations are off in the middle of a recession, or because they have too many community members contributing their time, expertise and enthusiasm for free, or because some unscientific survey didn't come up with a large enough listener number. Whenever you bring in a new manager there's a tendency to make changes for the sake of change, and perhaps that will be done. Though I have never worked at WTJU I have many fond memories of as a listener over the years and from time to time I have called in to discuss a piece of music with one of the friendly and dedicated announcers. I have donated when I could afford to. I hope the University will have the good sense to spare the life of WTJU as we know it, a distinctive cultural asset of UVA and the surrounding community.

Henry Wiencek | July 11, 2010 5:48 pm
You have some of the best classical programming on the air. That's why I listen and that's why I've donated. I think the classical programming is the core. During the week when your classical programming is off the air in the daytime, I listen online to other stations.

Liz Chaldekas | July 11, 2010 3:57 pm
In the last 15 years that my husband and I have lived and worked in this area, we have been continually impressed with the uniqueness of WTJU. Nowhere else have we found the eclectic and electric mix of programming as here at WTJU. Sometimes we hear pieces that we have never heard before. Sometimes we hear pieces we might not like. However, nowhere else can we hear local musicians and singers. This is a great advantage for the large and mixed community of musicians in Charlottesville. How else could the listeners make decisions about where to go for concerts and to music venues as well as restaurants and other local businesses. I have continued support of the station because it is not “talk” radio that wakes me up in the morning. It is not the blaring of commercials or obnoxious DJs going on about the latest music sensations. I get to hear classical, jazz, folk, rock and “new” music with knowledgeable, committed and lively announcers. Please keep the classical and jazz programming which is not available elsewhere at such high quality. I know I always learn something new and often hear something completely different, that other stations would not play.

Phyllis Binder | July 11, 2010 12:49 pm
The appeal of WTJU (and other stations like it which have been sold to commercial companies) is the originality of music selection, the caring involvement of the DJ's who play and discuss it, and the opportunity to learn about and enjoy the music without advertisements and major distractions. It would be a tremendous and incalculable loss to the community to give this up.

Steve Guion | July 11, 2010 9:56 am
Radio Wowsville rocks!

Pamela Blevins | July 11, 2010 8:46 am
If you are thinking of eliminating classical music, you will be making a grave mistake and you will be shortchanging young people by denying them access to music that matters and endures long after the latest pop fad had faded.

Mike Evans | July 11, 2010 8:15 am
I like our programing just as it is. 1 more hour of jazz in the AM would be nice. Your uninterrurted classical is much better than PBS in Richmond where they talk too much.

Vern Buchanan | July 11, 2010 7:59 am
You guys are looking bottom line but the beauty of this station is in its diversity . I moved her 25 years ago already aware of TJUs folk comittment . I have raise my kid & eaten our meals listening to its diversity . Its the 1st button on my radio & if you screw with it too much you will be making a huge mistake . Dont be one of the SKY PEOPLE . I love it & will continue to support it . Sincerely Vern Buchanan

Phyllis Olin | July 11, 2010 1:06 am
[phone] Don’t change morning classical; opera fan; WTJU classical is very important

Herbert Acuram (spelling uncertain) | July 11, 2010 1:02 am
[phone] more classical; likes country and bluegrass

Robert Epstein | July 11, 2010 12:53 am
[phone] Medical school faculty; increase classical music.

Tina Millard | July 11, 2010 12:51 am
[phone] Don’t drop opera.

Jack Lawry | July 11, 2010 12:50 am
[phone] long time listener, especially of classical and jazz; keep up the good work—thanks to the volunteers; NO talk shows.

Jim Bolling | July 11, 2010 12:48 am
[phone] strong supporter of classical music; it is educational programming

Eleanor Abbott | July 11, 2010 12:47 am
[phone] Don’t reduce classical; especially likes Sunday classical music; please don’t change the schedule.

Patricia Forest | July 11, 2010 12:46 am
[phone] treasures opera, chamber music, early music shows; willing to pay annual member fee.

Rick Walkenschmidt | July 11, 2010 12:44 am
[phone] WTJU has expert classical announcers; provides a good opportunity to expose children to classical music.

Michael Cresson | July 11, 2010 12:39 am
[phone] Works at UVA Hospital and listens to TJU. Likes morning classical.

Catherine Brooks | July 11, 2010 12:24 am
[phone] Keep classical – hosts are wonderful; WTJU adds to the cultural life of our community.

Ruth Tiger | July 11, 2010 12:20 am
[phone] WTJU is a valuable community resource; more classical!

David Harris | July 11, 2010 12:15 am
[phone] Likes shows and DJs; WTJU is educational; offers creativity and ethnomusicology.

Woods Stringefellow | July 11, 2010 12:11 am
[phone] Listener for 40 years; WTJU is the only station he listens to—keep classical as is.

Alan Barker | July 11, 2010 12:05 am
[phone] vote for classical music, especially Sunday Opera—loves the two legendary hosts.

William O’Brien | July 11, 2010 12:03 am
[phone] Retired UVA faculty; supporter of WTJU and WVTF; loves classical music daily and on Sunday morning.

Matt Uleberry (spelling uncertain) | July 11, 2010 12:01 am
[phone] New listener; WTJU gives a good break from his iPod; keep what WTJU has.

Eileen Mitchell | July 10, 2010 11:59 pm
[phone] Listens to morning jazz, not a big fan of rock, but glad the students have it. Not a big fan of Democracy Now.

Aaron Zatcoff | July 10, 2010 4:20 pm
WTJU is a vibrant sonic art museum that lives in the on-air programming we provide. We are the only source for art music in central Virginia. Where else can we hear Miles Davis, John Coltrane, Charlie Parker, etc? Where will they hear Baaba Maal, King Sunny Ade, Salif Keita, Fela Kuti, etc. We need to lead the community by educating ourselves and then the listening audience, not just reflecting popular tastes which are mostly commercial.

kevin burns | July 10, 2010 3:42 pm
Please do not destroy the wonderful variety and diversity now on the air by introducing rotating playlists, pop music that is available everywhere else, paid advertising, and by trying to control the artistic freedom the djs now have. The key to keeping WTJU interesting and listened to is to appreciate and continue the long tradition of cultural diversity there.

Eric Pierce | July 10, 2010 1:54 pm
Love: DemocracyNow, Sunshine Daydream, and Fri/Sat Blues. Hope some of these programs can continue. Thanks and good luck! I have been a donor in the past but this year has been a difficult one, as I'm sure you're aware.

Tim Beeghly | July 10, 2010 1:31 pm
WTJU has been a great asset to the university & central Virginia community. We all agree that WTJU has slipped a little in recent years in raising revenue. Some of that is normal from the worst recession in decades. Some of the blame is from within the station including DJ's, PD's, and the previous GM. We can reverse the downward trend in revenue by embracing changes that do not destroy the identity of the music at WTJU but promote the new and improved 91.1FM the Sound Choice in Central Virginia. It is time for the OPA to stand up and be part of this solution that includes maintaining the very unique character of what WTJU is.

Ruth Cross | July 10, 2010 10:48 am
Instead of burnishing the gem that is WTJU, please do not consider the cowardly and unimaginative alternative of dumbing it down.

patricia dougherty | July 10, 2010 10:18 am
As a pianist and teacher, I especially enjoy the classical programming on WTJU. I would strongly support continuing or even expanding this classical offering.

Jace Goodling | July 10, 2010 7:55 am
UVA is on the cusp of throwqing the baby out with the bath water in the biggest way ever. Programs are already suffering because of the discord created by the threat of changing to a commercial format. Cannot UVA see the value of the gem that is (and has been) WTJU for so many years?

Frank Saxon | July 9, 2010 11:53 pm
I would hate for WTJU to become just another setlist driven radio station. The appeal for me (and I'm sure many others) of this station is the joy of "discovering" new music. Without the exposure given to the different types of music that's available to me through WTJU (and nowhere else in this region) I honestly don't know where I'd find it. Please allow your DJs to continue to expose the listeners to their eclectic tastes. Thank you.

Mark Greenfield | July 9, 2010 8:11 pm
I must tell you that your station is one unique and wonderful part of C'ville. I would be very sad to see you change things up. I know many of your DJs and they take great pride in being a WTJU announcer. And quite honestly, they are all on top of their respective game. You are blessed in that regard. Your students could learn much from the old pros that are a part of WTJU. Certainly you could come up with some creative idea to involve your students. Please think outside of the box instead of caving to standard boloney. We are becoming to homogonized as a society. Help to keep us all from becoming like everybody else. PS, I have been turned on to so many great artists and music from your station. It is rare that I listen to a commercial staion and say, WOW. I have said WOW many times with WTJU.

byron robitaille | July 9, 2010 6:07 pm
July 9, and 320 people have responded in the forum, 65 of whom are volunteers! It's time for a change- so few people care to listen to wtju that it is embarassing. Let someone else play in the sandbox!

Rachel Keen | July 9, 2010 4:35 pm
I think it is very important to continue your commitment to classical music on the air. There are so few stations that provide excellent classical music that WTJU's continued commitment is critical.

Will Harvey | July 9, 2010 4:22 pm
I can't believe that an educational institution with a good reputation would destroy an amazing educational institution like WTJU. The dedication and knowledge that the DJs bring to their love of music should not be tinkered with lightly. UVA can't possibly be so hurting for $$ that they'd turn WTJU into just another radio station. If that's the plan, I guess I'll bring my iPod to my office and turn the radio off.

Audrey Bilger | July 9, 2010 2:50 pm
I had the privilege of being a rock DJ at WTJU from 1985-1992 while I completed my Masters and PhD in English. What I loved most about being a 'TJU DJ was the freedom to play whatever I wanted and to range widely beyond genre or limited categories. I remember roaming around the station, pulling records from folk, jazz, spoken word--whatever seemed to fit a theme or concept or riff I wanted to explore in any given show. That spirit of open exploration made WTJU one of the best stations anywhere and a perfectly integrated part of the University community.

A. Soroka | July 9, 2010 1:15 pm
The process that the new management and University administration has undertaken has obviously been badly flawed with regard to transparency and respect for history and for stakeholders. There's not much time left to recover any sense of trust and partnership. Please don't waste the little time remaining by hesitating to involve the volunteer staff and community as truly equal partners, and please avoid acting in any way that further contributes to the widespread sense that backroom machinations are working to destroy WTJU as this community has known and loved it for so long.

a further thought | July 8, 2010 8:10 pm
What is the thought behind scheduling a ONE HOUR public meeting? I hope there are contingency plans for staying a bit late. An hour?

Michael Sokolowski | July 8, 2010 7:00 pm
Turning WTJU into another AAA or 'Lite" public station will do nothing to raise listenership. There are plenty of other options out there. Tons. The market is saturated. In my view, your only play is to improve what you have. While your programming isn't perfect (and every listener has a different notion of what that would be), it's definitely on the right track -- and some of it is absolutely brilliant. By all means, work on improving the presentations, tweak the scheduling, etc. But don't change musical directions. That would not only be a crime committed against your avid listening base, but it also would be a bad business decision. If I had to offer one word to think about with respect to WTJU and raising its performance in our community, it would be "standards." Figure out who/what are the standard bearers now for the station and bring everyone and all your projects up to that level. Once you hit that, set higher goals. Etc.

MICHAEL J. GOURRIER | July 8, 2010 6:29 pm
WTJU is a beacon for great music in Central Virginia. It's diversity of programming makes it unique and the passion of the volunteers that do the shows make the station what it is. To turn to a commercial type format is not the historically based programming that is characteristically found at University based stations.

john costanza | July 8, 2010 6:03 pm
i have listened, and contributed to your station for many years and i pray that you can find a way to keep the programing like it is . you are the SANE choice in central virginia. thank you for all you do

David J. Simpson | July 8, 2010 5:41 pm
Let presenters continue to choose their own programming as now. A really deep study of all listeners (by e-mail?) to better understand the student/community preferences and interests.

Woody Parrish | July 8, 2010 4:57 pm
The questions on this site feel a little like push polling, asking me how best to achieve goals that I regard with skepticism. The need for wholesale change seems to be a given. I emphatically reject that notion, and challenge the University to recognize the uncommon value of this uncommon cultural resource.

Mary Ann | July 8, 2010 3:28 pm
Look forward and out of the box.

Ron Povich | July 8, 2010 2:19 pm
WTJU is a rare gem. The quality of the station can always improve, but hopefully not by sacrificing any of what makes the station a great music resource. WTJU could learn from other community stations around the country that have faced similar challenges. CKUA in Alberta almost went off the air a few years ago, but is going strong now.

Karen O'Brien | July 8, 2010 2:12 pm
Again: DO NOT CHANGE THE EXISTING FORMAT. I am an alumna and 20+ year resident of CVille and value WTJU extremely. UVA has a jewel in hand and does not seem to recognize this - the musical knowledge that the DJs bring and the music they expose us to is irreplaceable - and the fact that they play many genre is a strength. Moreover, WTJU is an educational tool in that students can learn from working in radio AND in that they learn by being exposed to the wide range of music broadcast. UVA should not only value this, but should support it financially! WTJU plays a vital community role. Kids in CVille are exposed to a wide range of music through WTJU, and the station is a critical part of "Town& Gown" interaction! Lastly, I find it more than a bit suspicious that UVA is doing this action during summer when students and faculty are away. If this is truly for the students, then shouldn't they be involved in the decision process?

Marietta McCarty | July 8, 2010 11:49 am
In an age of stifling homogeneity and commercialization, you would expect the University to strive to be different. You would expect not an either/or, black/white approach associated with rigidity and lack of creativity, but an inclusive and respectful quest for the best solution. And best does not always, indeed infrequently, means the big moneymaker.

Michele Mattioli | July 8, 2010 10:54 am
I've been listening to WTJU for 30 years. Please maintain this excellent community resource as a local and independent source of news and music.

Cyndy Williams | July 8, 2010 9:16 am
Great to see that the station is looking for ways to grow, involve the students & community more, maybe even more staff & faculty involvement too.

Jeff Carlin | July 8, 2010 8:44 am
Not much needs changing -- WTJU provides vibrant, innovative, fascinating programming (for the most part). What needs to be fixed is the fact that much of Charlottesville, and especially UVa, is unaware of this treasure in their midst.

Sarah (A & S, 1984) | July 7, 2010 9:34 pm
I would like to know what is driving this sudden need for change. WTJU provides a community service and educates many about different genres of music that they cannot learn about on other stations in Charlottesville. It has a strong cadre of community volunteers and supporters. It is one of the things that makes well educated people enjoy our community. Remaking WTJU to resemble WUVA or WCHV would by a horrible mistake. Taking away the DJs' ability to pick their own music seems particularly un-Jeffersonian.

will oldham | July 7, 2010 5:53 pm
As a former resident and frequent visitor to C-Ville, I'll say that WTJU is one of very few radio stations in the country that I know by name; I have had seminal listening experiences driving around Charlottesville listening to TJU, and I have been welcomed as a performer. My impression is that WTJU has kept up very high quality musical programming, and the value of this cannot be overestimated. The ears that are listening are listening intently, and using what they hear to all of our advantage.

Bev Ogilvie | July 7, 2010 5:16 pm
Please do not cut back your great classical offerings!

ned oldham | July 7, 2010 5:09 pm
please don't let it go corporate. keep it eclectic and dj-based. encourage creativity rather than repetition. Embrace new technologies; radio is the original internet: for listeners like me, it's even better: it's free and rarely shuts down. please save wtju. viva dj baconfat; tyler magill; danny shea; poobelle and hummingbirdfeeder; ralph graves, radio-star (whose amazing all-girl-group british late 60s fundraiser show a couple years back was brilliant; paula o. buckley, elizabeth benzinger; andrew pratt; rebecca; Bruce with Radio Tropicale; and these are just off the top of my head. Let's keep real radio alive!

Margaret Lee | July 7, 2010 3:22 pm
I'm a local music teacher. How about giving us a spot on the air?

Peter Welch | July 7, 2010 3:17 pm
There are some worthy goals in the new management's business plan, but changing the music is not one of them, and would ultimately be self-defeating. The elimination of classical music would be huge mistake that would not only leave a huge cultural void but would dishonor the University. UVa should be proud of WTJU as it exists now. Just promote it!!

Ryan Mann | July 7, 2010 3:05 pm
when music programming is selected by knowledgeable DJs, listeners have a chance to deepen their understanding and appreciation of music as an art form.

Holly | July 7, 2010 2:54 pm
I tune in online from out of state in order to listen to DJ-chosen music, especially Rock. I don't and never have lived in Charlottesville; I donate.

Swami Jyoti | July 7, 2010 2:38 pm
love the Sun.-Fri. 6-9 am classical programming - so much better than San Francisco my home town

Cindy Benton-Groner | July 7, 2010 1:49 pm
Please do not let the current DJs go. They are what make the station's programming unique. I have my favorites and I know when I can hear them and the kind of music they will play. Trust them to be able to fine tune what is already a wonderful radio station.

Bob Girard | July 7, 2010 12:52 pm
I came to this school in 1967, 10 years after the station made its debut. At that time it was strictly strictly classical, and WUVA was the AM rock and roll station. At 17, "all classical all the time" didn't appeal to me, but neither did WUVA. Local rock radio - at school, in C'ville proper and nationally - was the same, and required "personalities" to grab a share of the market, especially since everyone was playing the same 10 songs. Remember Bob Grant? Bruce Morrow? Wolfman Jack? Allison Steele? I do. Like you might know Max and Highway John, or Professor Bebop, or Brad Savage. Or Ann Williams. They are MORE than the stations they represent, and they are all reliable, even if some of them are occasionally annoying. Virtually ALL of the rock/soul/jazz dj's at TJU are personalities. Chuck Taylor? Not a personality. Not his task there. The new guy? Couldn't tell you. But if you don't realize that radio - local radio - is about personalities then you're sunk.

Bridge Cox | July 7, 2010 11:10 am
WTJU is a diamond in the rough, and half the reason I still associate myself with this town. Without it, we lose a big voice to sure, a small segment of our population. But to make our footprint bigger does NOT mean bending over backwards to mainstream radio theory. It does not mean compromising what our original mission statement states. It does not mean taking a 3000 person natinoal survey as the word of god that Americana will save a fringe radio station. WTJU needs help, but it does not need to change its values and integrity. Please please listen to us. We might be involved with WTJU, but we also are a part of this community and might know a little something that say someone who hasn't lived here might not know himself.

Marsha Burger | July 7, 2010 10:14 am
Please keep classical music part of the the programming

Lynn Shaughnessy Olson | July 7, 2010 10:05 am
I listen live from Monterey County, California. The programs are unique, entertaining and educational. There is nothing similar available locally. WTJU's library must be extensive and the programs are completely original. I can listen to music I would not be able to access otherwise and am exposed to pieces I would never think of om my own. Before radically changing the program mix I think it would be valuable to inform students and community about what a valuable asset WTJU is. Target student Newspapers, include a blurb in incomming student packets, invite local press to write an article about the station. Invite music and communication classes to use the station as part of the curriculum. I am seeing the issue as a PR challenge - not a programming problem.

Peter Brunjes | July 7, 2010 8:49 am
I depend on WTJU. I have learned _so_ much from listening to the station over the years. It is a jewel. Being non-mainstream is obviously financially difficult, but this is a college town. Where else are students going to have access to such diversity of musical styles? We need to stop comparing the station with commercial radio and begin to think of it more in terms of a library. WTJU provides a huge educational service for those who are interested in using it. It would be sad to lose it.

Chauncey McHargue MD | July 7, 2010 7:12 am
My favorite and successful publicly supported station headlines its format as "Classical Days/Jazzy Nights" and it has remained a successful commercial operation. The format attracts listeners with the means to make sustaining contributions and sponsors who know they are consistently reaching an audience they are targeting for their own promotional purposes. Go where the support is.

Jamie Ballenger | July 7, 2010 6:40 am
I really miss the Classical Music fund raiser that took place just before the winter break. I donated more often during that particular fundraiser, for whatever the reason. I would like more classical music as well. And, this may sound crazy, but some music education would be fun as well. Along the line of Dr Carl Haas who for years had this great radio music appreciation/education that was lively, interesting, funny, enlightening. I like Mr Dean's idea of more WTJU sponsored concerts, maybe some classic ones we can afford. Thanks for all the beautiful music.

Pete Marshall | July 7, 2010 1:22 am
My second post: For almost 20 years i was involved with WTJU, firstly when Fred Boyce recruited me to help with a Folk Marathon, then as one of the hosts of Atlantic Weekly Pt 2, & then as a host and cohost of Sunset Road. For the past 10 years i worked a 4 1/2 day week rather than a five day week so i could adequately prepare for my 2 hour show, not for the glory, but so i could present the very best show i could possibly present for folks who tuned in. I hosted live acts on Sunset Road, local and national, to promote their gigs, including the internationally acclaimed Irish band Lunasa who helped raise, together with Vieux Farka Toure, (whom i also arranged to play live on WTJU) over $40,000 for Darfur in that highly successful benefit at the Paramount Theater. The first fundraiser i participated in for WTJU turned people's heads because the show raked in so much dough. During the last fundraiser, i cohosted a show with Larry M that was also one of the top grossing shows, in part because i tapped my own community of support, who came through in spades. To them, I apologize...it turns out i was fundraising under false pretenses, as plans were already underway to radically change what WTJU is. To UVA and WTJU, I challenge you to offer to refund contributions made during the last fundraiser to anyone who feels they were hoodwinked into supporting an entity that was about to change fundamentally, and for myself, I demand the return of my own contribution (yes, I always put my money where my mouth is). You no longer have my allegiance, and I refuse to participate in adding to the resume of Mr Beard, who has treated the dedicated community of volunteers at WTJU with contempt.

Rusty Trainham | July 7, 2010 12:26 am
Somebody at WTJU should take a look at www.grants.gov.

active community member | July 6, 2010 10:00 pm
If the programming becomes what I knew at WVTF in southwest Virginia, where I could tell you the hour by the classical music on air, I will stop listening and never contribute. The classical and individually shaped play lists make this station unique.

Benjie and Bob O'Connell | July 6, 2010 8:46 pm
Keep the classical programming. It is a soothing way to start and end the day.

Becky Calvert | July 6, 2010 6:53 pm
WTJU is quite possibly, the best thing about living in Charlottesville. I love the jazz on weekday mornings. My husband loves the reggae and opera shows. My daughter loves "Tell us a Tale". I love the DJ's play music that they love. WTJU is a radio station for those of us who love ALL music. I listen to WTJU all day long. Please, please don't change.

Content Sablinsky | July 6, 2010 6:22 pm
Please do not curtail (or even, gasp, eliminate) classical music programming at WTJU. This station has developed an incredible reputation for musical sophistication and serves a widespread audience. As I heard one announcer say, "We program WHOLE works, not just movements like some other public radio stations in the area" (i.e., WVFT) Do not compromise this integrity!

Rick Kast | July 6, 2010 5:35 pm
The University should see WTJU for the unique and special community resource that it is, not as something that has to justify its existence by being a money-making enterprise or popular venue for student activities.

matthew simon | July 6, 2010 4:20 pm
I think many of the on air announcers could use a bit of training. I can't say how many times i have stayed tuned to hear what song is playing and i can't HEAR the announcer speak. This happens mostly with classical and folk shows. There is also this sense that the music being played sells the station (in many ways it does) but the announcers need to sell the station and have vocal passion for the station as they have the same passion for the music they play and share with the community. The station itself demands more respect from the people that volunteer, the management, and the university.

Sally C. Booker | July 6, 2010 3:19 pm
Sunday mornings I am totally transported when I listen to In the Spirit.  I am so inspired by the Early Music Show.  Eventide brings peace and joy to my life.  Classical Cafe is a pearl that brings me harmony.  Sunday Opera Matinee is fabulous...that's where I discovered Korngold.  Where else but WTJU would I go to discover great music?  Where else would I go to discover incredible jazz?  Your announcers have a rare and respected fountain of knowledge.   They even pronounce names and titles in perfect form. The current wave of thinking in our modern world is to believe that an overhaul is all good.  Lots of people go to meetings and talk about how to change things.  I won't argue that sometimes change is good.  But not everything needs to be overhauled.  The Charlottesville community does not need lose another treasure.  I have seen too many times over my life time in C'ville where change is made only to be later deeply regretted because those making the changes did not have good perspective on history and value.  I am sure there is a compromise that can be found that will not destroy the WTJU that is loved and respected in our community.

Alison Booth | July 6, 2010 3:09 pm
I play in a local classical string orchestra, and attend local classical music concerts. I advise music majors and other undergraduates. I strongly support maintaining diversity of programming, including classical music, on WTJU. I regularly listen to the opera on Sunday afternoon, a unique offering in this area.

Carolyn McGrath | July 6, 2010 2:44 pm
I hope you won't decide to dumb down your programming. It is a "university," a school of "higher learning," where culture in the form of high art and information of importance to society should be represented. Why not encourage patrons of classical music concerts to add to their subscriptions in order to sustain your programming, or ask on the radio for contributions to support continued quality. I will send something.

Michaux Hood | July 6, 2010 1:51 pm
Thanks for this forum where we community members can add our input. Feel free to contact me any time :) PS, I saw on another site a different being quoted as breaking Dave Matthews onto the scene! I first listened to Dave Matthews live on WTJU during the rock marathon and have tapes to prove it :)

Michael D. Mabry (Law 1991) | July 6, 2010 1:24 pm
Powers-that-be, whoever you are, you clearly have no conception what a rich, wonderful, unique treasure you have in WTJU. It is astonishing to me that – at the University, of all places – you can be so blinded to the extraordinary gift that you share with the world. It breaks my heart to think that the University would cast aside this amazing creation in the name of some unarticulated notion of “increased student participation.” You seem to treat WTJU as if it were an embarrassment, but the real tragedy is your inability to appreciate what you have. I have spent several hours this morning composing these responses, because I believe it is the least I can do for the Station that has brought me literally decades of enrichment and joy. As an out-of-towner, I don’t really expect my comments to carry any weight, and I cannot be present to lend my voice to the town hall meeting. The awkward attempts to frame the debate through the questions on this forum give me little hope that these concessions are anything more than a strategic delay. So in the end I would simply like to thank all the people who have made WTJU such special part of my life. I was listening. You were appreciated. Michael D. Mabry, Law 1991 mmabry@stradley.com

Davis Salisbury | July 6, 2010 1:08 pm
I can't stress enough how much the proposed changes to the programming at WTJU worry me. They seem counter-intuitive to the legacy of UVa generally, as well as to the legacy of WTJU. WTJU is an extremely special and rare commodity, which should be treasured. I know that financial concerns must be considered, but there are lots of changes to be made that do not involve changing the entire mission and nature of the station (which IS what is being proposed, no matter how much spin is applied to the discussion). In light of the manner and way these changes have been brought to the public's attention (not to mention the complete lack of forthrightness in regards to informing the DJs and current volunteers, many of whom have supplied HUNDREDS AND HUNDREDS OF FREE HOURS OF LABOR), while I am hoping for a reasonable outcome I fear for the worst. I will give any changes a chance, as it is only fair, but it seems that I will not have much to listen to on WTJU if the programming changes are implemented as they are proposed.

Brian Glover | July 6, 2010 10:45 am
I just hope that everyone in the UVA administration understands what a rare gem WTJU is now. Very, very few cities have a radio station of anything close to this quality. It all depends on the dedication of volunteer DJs who are in it for the love. You can kill that love overnight, but you can't get it back. Think about it.

John Dean | July 6, 2010 12:15 am
I absolutely love WTJU. It provides something positive to me almost every day! I'm sure that change is necessary, but I hope that the new management will assess the station's strengths and will not fall back on stock programming gimmicks to try to make the station into something it is not. Please keep the unique character of the station by encouraging the knowledgeable and enthusiastic announcers to share the music that they love. And increase the role of the station within the local music community, so that the station can find a more vital place for itself in the local scene. Specialization may be necessary -- I'd suggest focusing on classical, jazz, and folk music, possibly with one of those genres in a dominant role. WTJU is never going to capture a huge share of the local audience, but it is an important cultural resource and I want it to live on!

ann porotti | July 5, 2010 10:17 pm
i reject the tone and direction of the questions in this forum--none of which address the human and cultural facts on the ground. The human fact is the that WTJU consists of over 100 adult community volunteers. For over 50 years, these folks have built up a unique community radio station. Now much of this deeply valuable cultural work is being swept away by what appears to be a move toward a more corporate approach. As for the cultural fact, WTJU is above all about MUSIC. It is not about fundraising, or making money, or enhancing the University of Virginia's image vis a vis some other university's radio station. In all this talk of change, I have heard very little from Burr Beard, Marian Anderfuren or Carol Wood about music. Yet, music-Jazz, Rock, Folk and Classical the most endangered musical species of all-is what WTJU offers, and it offers it through the gift of the unique musical sensibility of each DJ. A university is above all about conserving what is valuable in the past, and the small amount of money the University spends on WTJU is surely returned every year tenfold by the "in-kind" contributions of the DJ's who keep our memory of the musical past alive.

Cal Glattfelder | July 5, 2010 9:12 pm
The spirit of WTJU and college radio in general is to give the djs a format and then let them explore. Getting students involved and having them pass on there interest in the world of music and radio is important. "You never know what you are going to hear" is a good thing and what WTJU's is all about. That's the niche, you can't compete with commercial or nearly commercial radio.

Malcolm Bell | July 5, 2010 7:08 pm
WTJU is a great asset to the Charlottesville and University community. Classical programming is rich in interesting works and performers. What is broadcast on WTJU can't be found anywhere else. The hours are the right ones for the classical audience (with the addition of Thursday night!). If changes are needed, they should fall into the category of fine tuning, and the hours for classical programs should be increased, not reduced. The University of Virginia should recognize that WTJU is one of the great resources for classical music in central Virginia.

Harvey Liszt | July 5, 2010 5:55 pm
I intend to request the return of my most recent financial contribution, which was obtained under the false premise that it would support continued operation of WTJU under the current format.

Ann Benner | July 5, 2010 5:32 pm
I have lived in a series of academic communities, and this is one of the best radio stations, just as it is. I hope there are not significant changes made.

Susie McRae | July 5, 2010 4:17 pm
Nothing like a good controversy to get people involved and listening. Maybe every so often you could create a little drama to get everyone excited. :)

greg wichelns | July 5, 2010 4:16 pm
Don't fix whats not broke. If its about the money, challenge the university to find another way. How about a daily "free speech radio".

Zack Perdue | July 5, 2010 3:58 pm
I abhor play=lists. Just don't do it.

Tina Eshleman | July 5, 2010 12:00 pm
I hope that in this "panic" about making the station more financially stable, the university does not destroy what people love about it. Also, you have many DJs who have volunteered their time and expertise for years, have developed a following, and who are now feeling completely unappreciated and are being told, in effect, that it's their fault more money's not coming in. Involving them with plans to take WTJU forward is critical.

Gary Westmoreland | July 5, 2010 11:47 am
Secondly, could WTJU co-sponsor a fund-raising event with Amy Goodman of "Democracy Now"?

Ponch | July 5, 2010 11:45 am
Hey fellow dj's - listeners & TJU supporters - just a quick positive Note: Was on a late night or early morning show on July the 3rd (3:am) during the near end of the show - had great feedback from 2 fellow Dj's and also a unique listener called about: 5:45 am and said: Para-Phrasing: I said hello and he replied: Great Program, I wanted to inform you that, Yes, you have listeners here at this houe and further, Your Show (old vinyl) is Superb, he added, I have been listening to it steadily since about 4:15 - 4:30 am and Am Really enjoying it, I replied, Thank you very, very much for your support and continued listening of TJU and looked forward to hearing from him again " It was a Very nice positive call and station - listener exchange: So I Thought this should be sahred with our fellow Dj's and public - Always great to receive such calls: It was quite nice indeed, Best regards - Ponch Sub Dj for various Dept's

Ponch | July 5, 2010 11:42 am
Local artists donate artwork for fund drive money(s) Djs who have the quick wit for conversation, use there on air moments to encourage support all the time, while informing the listener that we have him/her in mind first. Involve ourselves in downtown "on the mall" events far more frequently. Provide an on air advertisement welcoming first year students to the station right out of the gate. I have numerous other ideas. by Ponch McPhee

Bob Williamson | July 5, 2010 10:59 am
I've had my radio on TJU most weekday mornings since moving here 6 years ago. Myself, and many people I know would immediately no longer be listeners at all if those shows were replaced by folk or rock music. People need the exposure to, and really enjoy this music.

matthew kavanaugh | July 5, 2010 7:00 am
Do not cut Jazz. Do not cut Classical. Do not cut folk.

Pete Marshall | July 4, 2010 6:45 pm
The university has stated that they "let the train leave the station too early". Unfortunately that doesn't give me much confidence that this forum is much more than window dressing. It's clear that the University owns the station and ultimately can do whatever it likes, however I'd like to direct your attention to the WTJU mission statement which says in part "WTJU presents original, rich, and diverse programming of music and other forms of expression free from the direct constraints of commercial interests, reflecting the broadest educational goals of the University." Do some real fence mending & trust building...right now the trust isn't there and an adversarial relationship is in place between management and volunteer staff..is that what you want? Market the real gem you already have, rather than falling for dumbed down, ratings driven, bean counting, otherwise you are on the road to the American Idolization of WTJU. Recognize and respect the efforts & passion of the volunteers, and help them strive for excellence, instead of taking them for granted, otherwise, more of them will walk like i did.

Tucker Respess | July 4, 2010 5:33 pm
I have lived in Charlottesville for 17 years. Some highlights of the area are nationally & internationally known while some are familiar only to smaller, more-focused populations. For me, an antiquarian bookseller who is a music lover, WTJU is one of my two favorite cultural and educational gems here. I have no music background and have learned more about music in the WTJU "academy" than from any other source. I love it's variety, idiosyncrasy, and human warmth. Announcers broadcasting longer than my residence here and others who participated briefly have been fun to get acquainted with. Forced to pick, I would say my favorite shows are the Sunday Opera Matinee and A Time for Singing among the many terrific classical programs and Atlantic Weekly Part 2 (especially Kevin Dunleavy's shows -- I am a great Celtic music fan). And there is nothing like the Crank of Dawn! I would change nothing -- I'm thankful for what a so dearly love about it. Charlottesville is recognized as an excellent community to live in by various publications, including as a retirement choice, and WTJU is one resource to cite as why. Changes are likely only to disappoint me. Many of its voices are my friends. I don't want to lose them and their generous work. Bravo and thank you, I say to them! They deserve to have the station and their work better promoted by those in charge, to have input in deciding on changes, and to be carefully and respectfully informed of any station decisions, actions, and activities.

M. Scott Mampe/James J. Frey | July 4, 2010 5:15 pm
Very upset that the Early Music Show and A Time for Singing are leaving. We may have to depart also. Hope the Sunday Opera Matinee stays. Maybe the students will donate $$ for rock, but they can get that on lots of other stations. We are least send money for classical.

Holly Hintz | July 4, 2010 3:56 pm
As a local resident, UVA alum, current UVA employee, and faithful supporter of every fund drive, I listen to TJU every day, especially the early morning classical shows. I love the station and the opportunity to hear so many different kinds of music. Please continue the broad array you currently broadcast, it is greatly appreciated.

Charles Choi | July 4, 2010 2:30 pm
Radio is dying. Radio programming is alive and well: Or to be more precise, the decline of terrestrial broadcast as the medium for delivering audio programming continues unabated. But curated music shows by thoughtful and knowledgeable announcers have never been more popular which WTJU's style of programming has always excelled at. This style of programming has garnered WTJU national recognition (in particular Rock programming) and should be maintained. Attempts to increase listenership should be done by looking outside of terrestrial broadcast. Arguably should WTJU establish itself as a media platform, it offers a place for many academic departments and community organizations to contribute to its programming.

Randy May | July 4, 2010 12:57 pm
The prime problem isn't the kind of programming, or time slots, or blocks or any of that. The main problem is awareness, this could be overcome by a marketing strategy or approach to reach more listeners in the community and on the web. It would require an investment in expanding the stations' listener base and the public's awareness. The diversity of programming and the wealth of knowledge those dj's bring is immeasurable. To mandate play lists and reorganize programming to acquire some new superficial group of listeners will be a mistake. Take what you have and increase its availability and you'll get what you're looking for, better funding potential and involvement thru increased listeners. Things can always be tweaked to refine the product without changing its character or dumbing it down for people who aren't interested anyway. Don't ruin what you have here.

Jay Kardan | July 4, 2010 9:58 am
I would urge the university to regard WTJU not as a commodity or a PR tool but as a cultural resource, like its libraries, museums, concert series, etc. Let's forget about making the station "pay for itself." It's valuable enough to deserve all the subsidization it may need. What matters is the quality of the music WTJU broadcasts, not its commercial popularity. It is the knowledge, taste, and independence of the announcers that make WTJU so immensely superior to NPR stations as a source for great music. Please don't compromise or obscure those qualities by imposing playlists on the volunteers. And please avoid the trap of "professionalism" We listeners love WTJU because it is NOT professional. No amount of "tight boards" or slick delivery can make up for the homegrown qualities of the best radio station in Virginia.

Beth Hodsdon | July 4, 2010 9:42 am
This morning I am writing to you (and writng a check to support the station)while listening to a Bach Cantata (for the Fifth Sunday after Trinity), a late 20th century piano piece (American Berserk) and now some incredible early gospel singing--it is exactly this variety and unpredicability-within-predictability that I enjoy in TJU. A case in point: on the Roanoke and Harrisonburg stations you will generally hear choral music only around Christmas--apparently their restrictive playlist approach assumes that classical listeners are interested primarily in "background music." WTJU's serious classical shows provide the educational alternative.

Marva Barnett | July 4, 2010 8:18 am
WTJU's uniqueness in bringing us a wide variety of good, provocative, otherwise-never-played music is vitally important to this community. I, personally, listen most to your classical offerings, but also to jazz and pop music. I would argue, though, that a University should also serve thinking people with other musical tastes, as it does. Your volunteers are an extremely loyal, dedicated group of folks. I suggest not doing something that will alienate them--that would be, I think, a deathknell for the station (I have never been a volunteer, so speak as a listener, only).

Mary Anna Dunn | July 4, 2010 8:18 am
If you really want honest feedback, especially on individual shows, you need to conduct anonymous surveys. This should be done regularly. Survey returns tend to be low. Enter people who return surveys in a raffle. The main messages I really want to convey to you are these: 1) As a long time listener and supporter I am severely disappointed that The University did not solicit our comments sooner. I am extremely troubled that you tried to impose solutions from the outside, rather than trying to understand your audience better. 2) I do not want outside playlists, rotations, and gimmicks. I do not want to be another Austin. Charlottesville has exceptionally creative and talented musicians and we do not need to be anyone else. I find the new manager's comment that he will make us another Austin patronizing and ill-informed. 3) Some DJs are outstanding. Some could stand to be much more disciplined. As I said above, some talk way too much and we are not tuning in to listen to them. 4) Do try to find out which individual shows no one is listening too. Use regular anonymous surveys and also request feedback at pledge time. 5) Professionalize fundraising and increase your expectations for individual pledges. IN SUMMARY, UNDERSTAND AND RESPECT YOUR AUDIENCE. YOU ARE PLAYING TO A UNIQUE AND CREATIVE COMMUNITY OF LISTENERS. CELEBRATE THAT AND TREAT US AS PARTNERS.

Janice Fischer | July 3, 2010 9:49 pm
I found WTJU by happy chance when I moved here 20 years ago and I am constantly running into people who are serious music lovers who don't know about the station. Some of that is due to location - it's not always easy to get a good signal - but mostly its presence. Advertise! Bumper stickers, posters, interaction with local performing groups, anything to get your name in the public's attention. I listen primarily to the classical music offerings and am grateful for the knowledgeable hosts and diverse programming. And may I put in a plug for the opera show? It's my favorite.

L.A. Leavitt | July 3, 2010 9:43 pm
I answered these questions once before, even though they did make much sense to me. After further thought I believe that if there is a problem with WTJU, first lets define what the problem is. As a long term listener and donor, I don't see much of a problem with the station as it is. The general manger has been quoted in the local print media as saying that repetition is important. I could not disagree more. I listen to WTJU because I hear something new everytime. I like the fact that DJs who love their area of music delight in sharing with and teaching the rest of us. I don't tune in to listen to some playlist created by some marketing expert. I tune in to hear the news, the early music show, the opera, jazz, blues, reggae, world music, etc. etc. If WTJU becomes like every other station in town, there will be no reason to listen to it or donate.

Mark Buckner | July 3, 2010 9:38 pm
“Does ANYONE really listen to rhythm and romance?” Yes. Nick Page sagely calls the show “All the music you forgot you ever remembered.” Charles can raise a thousand dollars without raising a sweat. During one marathon I received a single pledge for $500. Charles had just finished playing an obscure version of “By Mir Bist Du Shein”, on vinyl. One listener had heard that particular version at a crucial point when he was romancing his wife. He had searched high and low to find a copy, to no avail. He offered a $500 pledge if Charles would give him the record. Talk about an offer you can't refuse!

keith forry | July 3, 2010 9:07 pm
All I know, is that having access to folk music on WTJU is one the better reasons for living in this area. It's a pure joy to listen to and something for which I'm very grateful. thanks,

Peggy Scally | July 3, 2010 5:25 pm
I love the jazz and classical programming; it gives me a reason to get up in the mornings. I always learn something about the composer/performer In addition, I enjoy the hosts comments and appreciate the time and thought that the volunteer puts into the information presented. The local flavor of the station is pleasant and welcome as compared to stations who just plug in canned programs.

Dave Rogers | July 3, 2010 12:43 pm
Give VERY careful consideration to the forthcoming suggestions from the music and volunteer departments for developing responses to these questions. Provide leadership to use the creativity of the staff with the practical experience and creativity of Public Affairs and other promotional departments of UVA. Don't dismantle what we currently have without strong efforts to support it first. Bringing in more students and doing for public affairs can certainly help. Changing the programming without strong evidence that it could work HERE could be completely ruinous.

linda blondel | July 3, 2010 12:05 pm
As a local performing classical pianist and teacher, I usually prefer silence as I go about my daily activities. However, when I do feel like hearing music as I do the dishes, I almost always turn to WTJU, and NO OTHER LOCAL STATION because that is where I can hear unusual music that I never heard before, which is what turns me on, whether it be classical, folk, world, or jazz. I especially love the eclecticism of the classical selections. I have even selected music for an upcoming concert from something I heard on WTJU. The DJs are superb, and even with my broad lifelong knowledge of music, I always learn something new and/or experience something moving. The Early Music show is so refreshing & exciting, especially compared to the BORING repetitious selections of Baroque music on WVTF. I LOVE Bruce Penner's Wed. noon program of African/world music, unique for any radio station. I lived in NYC and can honestly say that WTJU ranks with the best from that great city. Please don't ruin this community treasure! There are many good ideas mentioned in this Forum abt. how to increase revenue, but don't disrespect the devoted DJs and loyal listeners by axeing great shows. One suggestion: try to have more time devoted to uninterrupted music with less talk in between on each show. thank you.

Joel Bass | July 3, 2010 11:55 am
PLEASE, please don't try to fix what's not broken!!!

Elizabeth Benzinger | July 3, 2010 10:52 am
This Forum is a marvelous idea; I have enjoyed reading the many comments as they give me a greater appreciation of just how diversified our listeners are. My two big worries are: 1) that WTJU will be closed down by UVA because it is not appreciated for the gem that it is, and 2) that classical programing will not be allowed to continue because some short-sighted Yahoos (excuse me, Wahoos) don't appreciate the values it brings to the university and the community.

Barclay Rives | July 3, 2010 8:36 am
My favorites include Crank of Dawn, Charles Peale, Robin Tomlin, Michael Latsko, Ann Porotti, Ann Shaefer. WTJU has been eclectic & unique, a meeting place of students and community members.

Fletcher Stevens | July 3, 2010 12:12 am
I hope you keep the education aspect of the music, and not just repeat what we hear on other stations.

Judith Thomas | July 2, 2010 11:31 pm
I find the argument that the DJs care more about themselves than their listeners entirely specious and unnecessarily insulting. Most of the many, many WTJU jocks that I've known over the years have been utterly committed to their listeners. They think of themselves as teachers/artists/musicians, NOT as businessmen. Their listeners are friends/fellow music-lovers/students, NOT marks on an Arbitron graph. They think more about the quality of the listening experience than the number of people being served. It's entirely possible that the station has to get more hard-nosed and practical in order to survive, but I'd love it if the new administration could leave off publicly insulting the DJs.

Willian Kestler | July 2, 2010 10:22 pm
Please don't cut the jazz every morning and classical every evening, unless of course, you reverse their order. I can deal with that.

Madelyn Camerlita | July 2, 2010 6:58 pm
32 year listener, wrote to the Hook and they published my letter. Programs like a jazz show this week turned me on some great new artists. I went out and borrowed some cds of these artists from the library. Maintain the same weekday programming. Best station I've ever listened to, to enjoy and learn from. I will try and adapt to the new changes and learn to like it. But thanks to all the WTJU volunteers for all these great years of programming!

Jane Avery | July 2, 2010 6:54 pm
21 year listener, WTJU is the one of the best things about C-ville. Loves the freedom of programming - and WTJU misc has helped me heal from breast cancer.

Richard Armstrong | July 2, 2010 6:51 pm
I love jazz, reggae and Sunday opera. Have been a listener since graduating from UVA. Don't change!

Deborah Murray | July 2, 2010 6:39 pm
I will offer a comment specific to classical music, since that is what I know. Right now WVTF offers classical music during the week from 9 to 4. Our current schedule of weekday classical music in the early mornings and weekday evenings offers a real alternative for those who love classical music and don't necessarily want to listen to news.

Phyllis White | July 2, 2010 5:56 pm
Personal anecdote: Driving home late one night circa late 89, early 90?), turning on WTJU and hearing some amazing music that caused me to sit in my car outside my house for a long set until the next break when I heard it was the new Stop Making Sense from The Talking Heads. WTJU is the only place one can still hear an entire recording and have that kind of experience.

Mark Buckner | July 2, 2010 5:35 pm
The other day I was at a local restaurant, where I saw Hod O’Brien sitting at a table working on some music. Nobody bothered him. In fact, he seemed surprised that I even noticed him and spoke to him. He’s a world class pianist. That’s Charlottesville for you. ¶ WTJU isn’t for everybody, even though it has a little something for everybody. Be careful, lest you do to the station the equivalent of putting a cowboy hat on Hod and asking him to sing “today’s hot country”. ¶ As I read the blogs, the most enlightening came from Emmett Boaz. It boils down to this: Volunteer DJ’s don’t work for the man. Emmett just may be the canary in the mine.

Eric Wiland | July 2, 2010 3:32 pm
I remember visiting Charlottesville as a prospective undergraduate student. I learned that the University had a radio station that played both punk rock and classical music. I knew then and there that UVA had something for me, something I wouldn't find anywhere else.

Lynda Mosen | July 2, 2010 2:50 pm
I want to speak out in favor of keeping WTJU's unique classical programming. In particular, the Sunday morning classical program is something I look forward to all week. You have wonderful volunteers who put their hearts, souls, time and energy into providing great music to the community, please consider their dedication to your station when you make your decisions for the future of the station. It shouldn't be just about the money, but also about the volunteers, the community and the wonderful unique programming that WTJU provides.

Lisa Reeder | July 2, 2010 2:49 pm
I love WTJU. In an era of iPods and playlists, I actually listen to the radio most of the time, WTJU most of the time, because I am hearing someone's favorite music. Some DJs have made such an incredible commitment and contribution to our local vibe that the thought of not hearing their voices on a weekly basis is like losing a friend. I'm sure for them it is a labor of love and there is no need to sacrifice the devotion that already exists. I hear rumors of a 'rotation station' - boring, we already have those and they beat songs to death. Keep this democratic format -- this community supported radio station -- it is a vital part of this town and I'm certain there is a way to make it work. Thank you.

Mary Dykes | July 2, 2010 11:47 am
I think WTJU's strength is that it's local and doesn't just carry all of the NPR canned programming. The more the station emphasizes its local character, the more people will seek it out as a special alternative to what has come to be the rather usual, predictable NPR format.

Richard F. Gaya, Sr. | July 2, 2010 10:08 am
Changing the format of WTJU would be tantamount to installing aluminum siding on Monticello. RFG

Deborah Kelly | July 2, 2010 8:10 am
The Marathons are some of the most entertaining and educational shows you’ll find anywhere on the radio. The DJs bring so much to the table that it’s hard to believe administrators would quibble over paying them a little gas money. It’s obvious the DJs invest a great deal of time and research in their shows, and do it for the love of music. Please don’t kill this unique resource by nickel and diming the talent and quashing their creativity and enthusiasm. More importantly, don’t turn WTJU into just another cookie-cutter station that overplays the same music.

Aaron Margosis | July 2, 2010 1:57 am
I love listening to WTJU and I listen to the station everywhere I go (thank you for the internet stream). I will be sorely disappointed if these radical changes go through, particularly the required rotations in DJs' shows. Disappointed enough to stop contributing to the University.

bob cassell | July 1, 2010 5:35 pm
BRING BACK EMMIT! Put him in charge of program directing!

Gwen Loehr | July 1, 2010 12:16 pm

Matt Derhammer | July 1, 2010 12:03 pm
Public Affairs should recognize that WTJU is one of the few no-strings-attached contributions that the University makes to the community. More student involvement won't necessarily translate into more $: data show that students will make a lot of very small pledges and then not even pay those. It's great that you've found a station manager with so much experience, but it would have been greater had he been given time to familiarize himself with the greatness of the resource that's already there.

Scott Cohen | July 1, 2010 11:49 am
I'm a regular listener and contributor to the station via the internet. I listen because of the eclectic mix of forms, genres, personality, and sounds. A move away from its current (arguably tame) free form will mean I won't listen. When it comes to radio, I go where the adventure is.

Scott Barton | July 1, 2010 10:13 am
I would be very disappointed to see changes in the rock programming at WTJU. The station remains one of the few locations where I can hear something new and interesting. Going the direction of mainstream programming will mean that I will listen to the station, and radio, less.

Bill Traylor | July 1, 2010 9:57 am
A quick personal tally of programs followed regularly or occasionally comes to 16. [But that includes Sunset Road.] Among those, I'd guess that at least a half-dozen DJs would know my name from phoning in requests, compliments or a playlist inquiry about some great new musical discovery that had not otherwise come my way. Not to mention pledges of financial support, a matter of recently renewed personal enthusiasm.   Induced to Judder. Jumping On the Bed. Nothin' But the Blues. Sunshine Daydream. Eclectic Woman. Vagabond Shoes. Garage Sale. Jazzmania. Professor Bebop..These, among others, can't be replaced by a formula.        Please do what is possible to inform a broader listenership of, and preserve the unique community resource that is WTJU through enhanced funding and/or the allocation of other resources and promotional opportunities.

Michael Brooks | July 1, 2010 1:04 am
I was a WTJU programmer for 4 years. In my final year at UVa, 1986-87, I was the station manager. Today I listen to WTJU online. WTJU and by extension the University has ignored a pool of support over the years by not reaching out to alumni. It is not too late to correct this mistake. As you are keenly aware by now, WTJU alumni are a passionate lot. We love music and understand its power to educate and transform. I am taking the time today to post to this forum because of what WTJU meant to me and what I know it will mean to students down the road. Alumni such as me will give financially and with our time to see that our legacy endures. Respectfully – Michael Brooks (CLAS 87).

Kirsten Schofield | June 30, 2010 8:36 pm
The proposed "consistency" proposal is not the right path to change. WTJU is powered by volunteers who are passionate about educating listeners, and that is how it should stay. If we tell the DJs what to play, how are we different from the Corner? That's not a model we should seek to emulate. As radio becomes more and more homogenized, we should work hard to be something different and something better. More than one person has told me that WTJU was among the top reasons they loved living in Charlottesville. No one says that about 91.9. If we start dictating that Radiohead has to be played once an hour because CMJ says so, how can we describe ourselves honestly as the sound choice of Central Virginia? By shifting to this new system, we would be abandoning our values as a station and doing Charlottesville a criminal disservice. We have a longstanding tradition of excellence in broadcasting, so let's work together to help hosts become better at engaging their listeners rather than scrapping something we all hold dear.

Terry Stegman | June 30, 2010 3:31 pm
I like this station VERY much and am worried that too much will change. Please do not go too commercial. Please continue the open, unscripted talk and original programming. This is the ONLY local station I've listened to in five years. There is a reason for that.

Jane Foster | June 30, 2010 3:29 pm
I love WTJU and hope you can keep on with the same programs you have now - even if you have to change the timing.

Bill Davis | June 30, 2010 3:21 pm
I've listened to radio stations all over the country and there are very few which rival WTJU in its quality and diversity of music. It is, in my book, one of the very best things about this community and I would hate to see it change into the kind of radio station one hears everywhere -

Elizabeth Hull | June 30, 2010 2:52 pm
WTJU is an extraordinary product -- however management has abandoned basic public relations and marketing techniques, and ignored fundamental educational, artistic, and non-profit fundraising methods. Get the marketing and donor sides functioning, and work to trim expenses.

Janice Fischer | June 30, 2010 2:03 pm
There have been some good ideas mentioned by others. I've got other classical radio options but TJU is my favorite. I like the eclectic programing and the individuality of the hosts, even if I'm not crazy about all of them. I'm particularly partial to the vocal music programs since so many stations are afraid to play it. Ordinary is everywhere - keep to your mission. This is a fabulous resource for the area and should be recognized as such. WBUR in Boston started as a college station for Boston University and now if a full fledged Pubic Radio Station. WTJU doesn't need to do that but it does need to take itself seriously.

Walt Rodney | June 30, 2010 1:34 pm
I think the University initially handled this opportunity quite badly. It would be productive to acknowledge that. I'd also like to see playlists and podcasts be required to be published.

Byron Robitaille | June 30, 2010 1:24 pm
I forced myself to listen to another local non-commercial radio station for an hour this morning, and while it wasn't torture, a steady diet would not be possible. And of course I can't make a steady diet of wtju either. I still remember (geezer alert!) when fm radio was young, and you could hear the group WEATHER REPORT and Johnny Cash,Stan Getz, Ravi Shankar, Little Richard and The Flying Burrito Brothers in the same hour. Niche radio can't hold a candle to free form radio, but now that the possible choices have expanded exponentially since "the good old days" I guess we're stuck with genre specific. At least wtju has room for lots of genres, and I hope we can keep it that way. It's a shame that 5000 adults with jobs can't support it- instead we have the embarassment of raiding the student fees and kow-towing to the corporation for public broadcasting. "Ya don't miss your water 'til the well runs dry"

Gary Westmoreland | June 30, 2010 12:09 pm
I think the classical music played on WTJU is a treasure trove to the ear. The volunteer staff announcers in the classical music area really provide something unique in their selection of pieces. I hope the station can keep this valuable segment in its repertoire.

Patricia Price | June 30, 2010 11:45 am
The plan put forth by the university and Burr Beard is based on a faulty premise—that the WTJU does not have an identity that is worthy or capable of being promoted to the benefit of the university, the students, the community, and the station itself. WTJU already has a “brand” that is valuable and unique. It is based on the exquisite quality of the music, the depth and breadth of the genres presented, and the knowledge and commitment of the announcers and staff. To supplant all of that with a ready-made template highlighting Americana and BBC talk is short-sighted, ill considered, and amazingly cynical. It is a vision unworthy of a university.

tom klippstein | June 30, 2010 11:19 am
The change from morning to evening would not be a particular hardship to me as an announcer. As a listener/contributor, I much prefer having the jazz shows in the morning. My guess is that many listeners feel the same way, making it a gamble to assume differently. The suggestion that one announcer/one show would be easier or better for listeners seems to me to insult our listeners. As a listener, I love it that Early Music is presented by different people different weeks. Ditto Eclectic Woman. Ask anyone. Bad idea. Another part of the “master plan” (what a presumptuous and obnoxious term that is!) is the idea of “playlist” songs. This seems to me to negate the distinction which WTJU fans appreciate. People who’ve talked to me about the “master plan” have said, for example, “The utter unpredictability of WTJU is so special,” and “so many of the announcers find stuff to play that I’ve never heard,” and “why do they want to fix something which not only ain’t broke but is one-of-a-kind and wonderful?” A word about the “5 Year Plan.” I understand that this sort of thing is required in an organization making changes. I am dubious, as I expect the designers of the plan must also be, that revenues and listenership will increase by anything like the goal amounts. I just will be sorry five years from now that so many volunteer announcers had to suffer for this pipe-dream. Finally, a plea. If changes are to be made in August, please get in gear now and let people know what they are. Do some thinking and some planning and some communicating rather than repeat the debacle of June. Respectfully submitted, Volunteer Announcer Tom Klippstein, Jazz Songline

Lester H. Fink | June 30, 2010 11:12 am
I'm specially attracted by the freedom your hosts have in their programming, which has greatly added to my own education and enjoyment of classcal music. Whatever you decide to do, don't infringe on their freedom in their programming!

Paul Fisk | June 30, 2010 10:53 am
I would miss the morning and evening classical programing. I have been a listener ever since the station started and have been a supporter for about 20 years. I also enjoy student recitals on a regular basis at UVA, and I listen to student performances on the radio when available. Please keep the classical music coming!

Elizabeth Rinaca | June 30, 2010 9:29 am
I enjoy the programming of WTJU. It has contributed to the musical education of not only myself, but also my children as well. My children enjoy the classical shows (Eventide and The Early Music Show), the Big Band music (Rhythm and Romance), and early folk music (Walking Blues). Each show has its respective place on the timeline of musical history. We would hate to see any of those shows disappear.

mary jo ayers | June 30, 2010 7:17 am
I REALLY LOVE THIS STATION!

Jim Jones | June 29, 2010 11:13 pm
Thursday Night is our favorite in our house. We love to listen to Sandy Snyder.

Richard Leahy | June 29, 2010 9:38 pm
I've been listening to and enjoying this station for 20 years; it's a big part of my enjoyment with living in Charlottesville. The 20-year old show promos I keep hearing really date this station as being stuck in a time warp or a legend in its own mind. You've got to stop recycling stale promos (especially those of the pretentious Charlie Curtis, carrying on like he's some kind of Mr. Cool; I'm offended by it and I'm not even African American). The good news: I can't imagine life here without listening to WTJU daily. I love Atlantic Weekly, classical jazz and folk programming, and Democracy Now.

Laura | June 29, 2010 8:57 pm
please don't ruin the wack!

Joyce Dudek | June 29, 2010 7:56 pm
Keep classical music. Reach out to faculty to require more student participation. Keep WTJU as a eclectic, creative station. We do not need another NRN!

Laura Leavitt | June 29, 2010 5:26 pm
WTJU is the only radio station I listen to. I listen to the news, early music, world music, opera, classical and jazz. I listen (and donate) because I usually hear something new that I am not familiar with (not true on other stations). Where else can I listen to African music? Its fantastic the way the DJs get to choose what they want to play!

Joy Rayman | June 29, 2010 5:07 pm
WTJU is the only radio station besides NPR that I listen to. Please don't change your format and become mainstream (I detest mainstream)! Unfortunately, I spend a lot of time in my car, but thankfully the music on WTJU has made my journeys much more pleasurable. One of my passions in life is to be introduced to music that I haven't heard before, and I love all genres...Classical, Folk, Jazz, World, Rock and everything in between. WTJU is the only local radio station that provides this, and my musical library continues to grow because of what I hear on 91.1 I suspect I'm not the only one out there who feels this way. Please, don't change the format! Continue to play music that quenches my thirst for all things eclectic, obscure, interesting and awe inspiring!!!

Elizabeth Brickhouse | June 29, 2010 4:48 pm
I can't add to the many great suggstions that are already out there. I just want to say please, please, please let the DJs continue to choose what they play. That's what makes this radio station so amazing and such a community treasure!

Jennifer | June 29, 2010 3:59 pm
My big suggestion would be to reduce the overall budget of the station, as it seems to be much higher than many college radio stations. I know that a station can survive on less than $100,000 a year, so am wondering where all of the money goes at WTJU. Can you eliminate paid staff? It seems like reducing the budget would really help to take the pressure off of fundraising.

David Soyka | June 29, 2010 1:57 pm
What's brought this "discussion" about is the poor execution of a station format change. Interestingly, only one of your questions concerns the music format. While I understand the need that perhaps some change is necessary, the issues of student involvement, underwriting, and fundraising do not necessarily depend on a format change. The thinking that a format change will result in better fundraising is arguable. It might. But, it might also be the case that if the station was better marketed and more actively engaged student and community stakeholders, that the existing format could garner a larger audience. Perhaps that should be the first priority before radically altering the station's identity? Finally, it was a mistake to ask which kind of music do you prefer-my guess is that most listeners listen to several, possibly all, of the genres. Such a question seems designed to pit the departments against one another as a justification as to which one should get the most/best air time, or possibly continue to exist at all.

Jim Mandell | June 29, 2010 1:31 pm
The breadth, depth, and quality of musical programming at WTJU is remarkable. There are some super-hip rock stations at other prestigious universities, and some very solid (but way serious) classical and folk stations in big cities. However, there are only a few stations in the world (maybe there really aren't any anothers) with this unbelievable diversity and depth of programming. The musical archives and the DJs' deep knowledge and passion about the music are priceless. Any major restructuring of the station that limits the ability of the DJs to express their musical passions over the air and over the net will be a sad loss for U.Va. and the worldwide community of listeners.

Mark Hineline | June 29, 2010 1:15 pm
I spent several years at WTJU as a DJ in the early 1990's, playing jazz and blues. I have contributed many times and continue to enjoy listening to the station frequently. What makes WTJU such a valuable station is that it is different from other stations. Specifically that there is such a wide variety of music within a given day and sometimes within a given show; DJ's have the freedom to pick the music that they like and want to play- there are more artists than I can remember that were introduced to me by DJ's at WTJU. I understand that things do need to change sometimes, however the current approach to making changes risks alienating the many long-time, devoted listeners that have supported the station for decades. Speaking for myself, if changes are made that strip the station of what makes it unique and valuable, I will no longer support the station. There are many, many stations on the radio where one can hear rock music, silly DJ banter, ad's and the same song 5 times a day. What the listeners get from WTJU does not exist anywhere else in this area that I am aware of. I would urge those with decision making power to be open to the suggestions of those who have been listening and contributing to the station for many years and especially the DJ's who volunteer their time, knowledge and passion for what they love; if no sincere effort is made to address the many concerns found on this forum, there may be little audience left to build. It is also possible that the business who currently provide underwriting may no longer want to support the station either. It crosses my mind that perhaps that is the goal after all. I hope not.

Joey Conover | June 29, 2010 12:23 pm
By accident I selected all radio buttons under music I listen to and cannot de-select them. I wanted to select folk and rock.

Adam | June 29, 2010 11:46 am
There are some very good programs on WTJU (and some a little past their prime). But if no one is listening, does the station still make a sound? If not, then "Sound Choice in Central Virginia" is simply not true. Change has to happen, so create a schedule that will draw the listeners in (and make the stay throughout most of the day/evening). You don't have to dumb down the programming, but at least make it a little more listener friendly. And publicize that WTJU is on the air.

wynne Stuart | June 29, 2010 11:16 am
The Arts in general at U. Va. are an area in which we are consciously trying to improve. Promoting music of all kinds could be part of that effort.

Greg Raymond | June 29, 2010 11:10 am
Please do not change the format !

Charles Flickinger | June 29, 2010 10:16 am
I strongly support the continuation of Classical Music programming on WTJU. (I listen mainly in the morning while having breakfast and preparing for the day.) First, I credit WTJU with opening the world of modern classical music to me by playing works of composers that I simply would not hear otherwise. Second, I think that, of all the musical genres, it is the obligation of an educational institution to bring classical music to its community, especially one such as this with very limited classical programming. Recently I had a conversation with a friend from another state about my acquired taste for 20th century classical music. He credited me with much work and persistence in developing an understanding of a field of music that he has not been able to appreciate. My reply was that I had come to appreciate modern classical music, as well as many composers from earlier times, through my local community radio station, WTJU, on which announcers present classical music from a variety of periods, thus easing me into those areas that were less familiar to me. In summary, I simply would not have expanded my appreciation of classical music without WTJU, and I would consider it a major loss if it were no longer available in its adventuresome format. I depend on WTJU for continuing to learn about classical music.

Thomas and Lynda Terrill | June 29, 2010 10:15 am
WTJU has been one of our favorite parts of living in Charlottesville. When we lived in the DC area we experienced the gutting of WETA. Please do what you need to attract more student interest and community funding, but please do not destroy the creative, eclectic, democratic heart of the station.

Nicole Radshaw | June 29, 2010 8:28 am
WTJU helped me complete my graduate degree in 2002. The variety and depth of the musical selections by the DJs are outstanding. I only wish I volunteered while I was still in town.

Margaret Mohrmann | June 29, 2010 8:19 am
WTJU is almost perfect as it is--to be entirely perfect: more classical programming. Even without catering to my tastes, however, it is reliably excellent radio. Please don't change its unusually eclectic style and, for heaven's sake, don't turn it into another programmed hit player!

Margie Garmey | June 29, 2010 7:59 am
No station compares to WTJU in variety and originality of programming. That's what makes it special and valuable. If it loses those qualities, there's no point in having the station. ps MORE classical music, please!

Blue O'Connell | June 29, 2010 6:50 am
Their could be a mentorship program installed where some long term volunteers doing shows 10-20 years can take a student and teach them about a new genre of music. The folk dept. has so many genres from world, celtic, bluegrass, country, etc. It seems most of the students get involved in the rock dept. Folk dept. could use some new/fresh perspectives. The students can intern for a given show and help research, preview and pull music for a the show. They can help file CDs after a show, take phone calls for requests and assist the main DJ.

Anna Stelow | June 29, 2010 6:47 am
UVA provides an essential service to its students, staff and community in the very fine independent programming of the station. The classical programming on WTJU is among the best around.

Tes Slominski | June 29, 2010 12:33 am
he best thing about WTJU has always been that its announcers LOVE the music they play, and that enthusiasm always comes across on the air. That's worth a hell of a lot, and it's what makes me keep listening even though I've lived away from C-ville since 2004. Having said that, spending time training (and retraining) announcers is NEVER wasted. Challenge announcers individually and collectively to work on their presentation styles--to be the best announcers they can be, from working the equipment to mic technique to speaking voice breath control. Make the station sound more professional, and everyone will benefit.

Ted Jones | June 28, 2010 10:33 pm
WTJU is an essential link between the City and University and is a defining aspect of Charlottesville, the place. True community radio is a rare gift. Keep the diverse music programming; perhaps expand student involvement through student-led local news and interview segments. This could reinforce the town-school connection and build listenership.

Kristin Szakos | June 28, 2010 10:00 pm
Love the station. Don't homogenize it! Thanks.

Pam Roland | June 28, 2010 9:45 pm
I LOVE this station! Specifically, my mornings are better when I listen to the classical programs as the sun comes up and my Sundays are ALWAYS in my art studio, listening to the opera! Please find a way to continue the excellent variety you offer our area!! As to increasing revenue, I don't know how that part works...but please don't go away!!!!

Deborah Healey | June 28, 2010 9:22 pm
Please don't change the current set up.

Ruth wadlington | June 28, 2010 9:13 pm
If classical music is not retained, you will lose me as a listener and contributor. Don't risk losing faithful listeners by too many changes unless you are assured the newcomers will be good supporters as well.

Stacy Morrison | June 28, 2010 9:10 pm
I really like the Jazz programming. I would love to hear more shows offering the New Orleans Sound and Jazz. I think the hit HBO series, Treme featuring local New Orleans music will only drum up more listeners searching for this type of music.

Daniel Ehnbom | June 28, 2010 9:03 pm
WTJU is a great station just the way it is. Please don't spoil it.

Scott Morrison | June 28, 2010 8:52 pm
I really enjoy the Jazz shows on WTJU, they are great. I think a morning Blues show during the hours 7am-8am would be great for listeners commuting to work. When I lived in Atlanta I listened to a radio show from 6am-9am called "Good Morning Blues" and I was addicted to it.

thornton staples | June 28, 2010 8:48 pm
WTJU has always been very unique in my experience, both as a student and an even longer-time Charlottesville community member. It is more of a broad view of music and other programming than any other station I have ever heard. I am a big fan of both WNRN and the local NPR stations for what they do; the students at UVA have many options for getting the more mainstream programming (relatively speaking) that those stations offer. WTJU offers a survey of interesting music that is irreplaceable as an educational experience. Somehow, that message needs to be communicated to the students, that the independence of the WTJU DJs encourages them to investigate music more widely. Lot's of college radio stations give students a local copy of what is fashionable; WTJU gives them the whole wide world.

Marcia Requa | June 28, 2010 8:28 pm
The morning classical music is a boon in an otherwise cluttered radio world of trash talk and right wing vs. left. Please support the continuing nourishment of the spirit.

Susan Bates | June 28, 2010 8:22 pm
Keep the programming as wonderful as it is.

one last thought... | June 28, 2010 8:09 pm
Perhaps there are untapped opportunities for the station to partner with the McIntire Department of Music, UVA's other best-kept secret. Mutual promotion at events, websites? Academic credit for music majors to work at the station?

Robyn Kells | June 28, 2010 7:32 pm
As a station that does not take automatic dictation from mass-media playlists and features all kinds of music from all over the world, WTJU is an increasingly rare gem. Let's polish that gem, not fracture it. PLEASE do not strike at the heart of what makes it so precious--its community focus and its independent programming. PLEASE.

AnitaAnderson | June 28, 2010 4:56 pm
I have been shocked to hear that Jazz and classical programming might be eliminated altogether. I have been enjoying these programs for twenty years and have appreciated the volunteers' energy and enthusiasm in sharing their musical passion and knowledge. It has always been diverse and mind opening. Why do you need to reduce the genres of music offered by your radio? Folk and rock, more popular...is it this the motivation? Universities have a mission to promote diversity, stimulate curiosity and preserve a cultural heritage. And you are an integral part of it.

Clinton Hensley | June 28, 2010 4:26 pm

Jonathan McVity | June 28, 2010 3:40 pm
Your brand is so distinctive that diluting it is a huge pity, particularly in classical where your breadth has so long been superb across so many periods.

Lorrie Delehanty | June 28, 2010 1:36 pm
Please keep the classical and folk programs on the air. It would be a travesty to lose this kind of culture from Charlottesville.

Bill Maisannes | June 28, 2010 1:21 pm
Integrate WTJU into the current Campaign strategy. Lots of content here could be leveraged at WTJU: http://www.virginia.edu/uvapodcast/ http://www.virginia.edu/alumnieducation/ For example: Wouldn't it stop people in their tracks if they heard Watergate-era Nixon coming out of their car radio??? Kennedy? FDR Fireside Chats? http://whitehousetapes.net/

Roger Adams | June 28, 2010 12:28 pm
I work at home and listen to morning jazz programming Mon-Fri. Please keep this programming in place. As for evening jazz, I think some of the "jazz" programs are not jazz. WTJU competes with NPR for evening jazz listeners, and I'm sure it loses jazz fans to NPR when it plays funk, r&b, and other non-jazz music during its "jazz" hours. WTJU should rethink this. You wouldn't play rock during classical hours; why play r&b during jazz hours? To do so loses at least some jazz fans to your competition. One final thought: market,market, market. People just don't know about your great shows. Tell them!

Robert Young | June 28, 2010 12:21 pm
Please. Keep up the classical music. An excellent springboard for my day. Plus learning about classical music, history and performers plus the cultural rewards. Please! Bob Young

Michael Kidd | June 28, 2010 11:42 am
Should give and give a lot to the Sound Choice in Central VA, but struggling here to keep up a standard of living these days. Hope classical programming will continue. Not as keen on the dissonant classical programming, but that's a personal preference. Need more shows like the Friday morning classical. Would like to see the lo-fi noise that is Democracy Now go. I'm about as liberal as they come, but this show just stresses me out and the low-fi "in a bucket" sound just makes it even worse. Insert classical programming here.

Sumner Brown | June 28, 2010 11:40 am
To me it makes no sense to make WTJU more like other stations - more commercial. The reason people listen to us is to hear music without commercial influence - to hear music chosen by the DJs. If we don't have this distinction, why would anyone choose us over the others?

Marcia Doran | June 28, 2010 10:08 am
I am a WTJU alum (74-82) and a UVA alum (CLAS78). I am also a donor - I donated $400.00 during the last marathon alone. I am deeply concerned about the proposed changes, and feel that continued dialogue with the staff and the community are mandatory before such sweeping changes occur. I believe viability can be secured for the station without using such draconian measures as has been proposed.

david stone | June 28, 2010 8:27 am
WTJU is a superb station and enormous resource for the university and the community- please leave classical and jazz intact so far as consistent with your current goals thank you

Linda Childs | June 28, 2010 8:09 am
I am a long-time contributor to WTJU, beginning in the era of the "Classical Exam Marathon"- which was the ONLY on-air fund-raising programming (and I have heard plenty on NPR) that I ever have actually LOOKED FORWARD TO! Your Classical Programming hooked me and has kept me listening and contributing for 20+ years. I was bereft last week when there was no signal on Friday Morning and no 6-9am Classical Comfort with Ilana. Every one of your Classical volunteer announcers add an incalculable level of class and expertise in their personal choice of programming. THEY ARE WTJU'S GREATEST ASSET! If the current morning/evening/Sunday Opera programming should no longer be available,I will tune my radio dial and my listener contributions entirely to NPR.

Izrael Zak | June 28, 2010 7:55 am
WTJU is a treasure just the way it is. I love it and have loved it since moving to the area in 1992. I currently contribute $ 200 each year and would be willing to increase that to keep the station with its erudite, clever, eclectic programming. I listen to this station all the time. IT is a welcome relief from the banal fare usually available on commercial radio and often a relief from the gloomy news on various local NPR stations. PLEASE don't pull the current programming away without allowing the loyal listeners to act on behalf of a central piece of our daily consciousness. I LOVE this radio station and would feel deprived of something vital were it to be changed beyond its current configuration and become an "ordinary" radio outlet. I. Zak

Fred Gruber | June 28, 2010 6:39 am
I hope you will find some way so that = 1 - We do not have to sign in each time. DOES THAT NOT RESULT IN MULTIPLE COUNTS OF MY INPUT DATA.? 2 - You develop a THREADS technology, so we can consolidate comments on the same topic. 3 - Burr can/will release a schematic of his proposed PROGRAMMING so all will know what to discuss. Fred 6-28

John Taylor | June 28, 2010 12:46 am
There ought to be at least one hammer dulcimer program hosted by the eminent Burr Beard, who is "is one of the great hammer dulcimer players of the late 20th and early 21st centuries", according to his website: http://www.burrbeard.com/burr_beard/Welcome.html

Marcia Day Childress | June 27, 2010 8:27 pm
I've listened to WTJU regularly since 1970. It's a rare and valuable community resource. The university has provided only limited support over all these years, and the fact that the station is still present and vibrant has everything to do with the volunteers and little to do with university resources. After skimpy backing all these decades, the university now looks to the station as another means of institutional self-promotion, marketing, and fundraising. For shame!

Thomas Pease | June 27, 2010 6:10 pm
WTJU is a community treasure. Don't turn it into a triple AAA or just another NPR light station. I used to live in Bloomington, Ind. which had a strong roots-driven community station (independent of Indiana University). If the university wants to be more directly tied to the station, it should be more arts-focused, giving a greater voice to arts organizations on campus (which I think it already does), and add some thoughtful broadcasts of lectures and forums (Miller Center, etc.). Charlottesville needs more depth in its arts offerings on air (and online), not less.

Sandy Snyder | June 27, 2010 5:40 pm
Having to pick only one genre on the survey above is a profound disservice to WTJU listeners. Many of us, if not most, listen to more than one genre regularly. That's the main reason we love WTJU. PLEASE do not cut or limit the Classical programming. It is the only place on the dial where you can hear an uninterrupted piece of music. Thanks!

Anne Becker | June 27, 2010 3:39 pm
Please don't ask questions like "what kind of music do you usually listen to, choose one." There are only two kinds of music, good music and everything else, and I listen to good music on WTJU.

kevin parks | June 27, 2010 3:26 pm
WTJU is awesome!

Jay hertel | June 27, 2010 1:59 pm
Keeping the independent nature of WTJU is critical. Celebrate and promote the independent nature of WTJU, don't smother it.

Zoe | June 27, 2010 2:23 pm
Maybe student activity fees aren't the best place to get 40% of funding. WTJU is one of the best radio stations in the country due the quality and variety of its programming. Many of the DJ's are experts in their genres. UVa should remember that it is a cultural, public, and academic institution, not just an engine for economic growth. Many of us in the community rely on WTJU for relief from the homogeneity that increasingly inundates our world. If we can't access the new, the different, and the obscure here, then where?

Elizabeth Stark | June 27, 2010 11:46 am
If the University made all decisions based on popularity I guess there would be no academic publications, art, or poetry. Just as scholarly ideas and literature contribute to the community, so does the progressive content on TJU. Please keep the station free from and musically diverse. TJU is a real asset to the community and something we all need to fight for.

goldfinger | June 27, 2010 9:58 am
(there's no "Everything" button to select for what I listen to on 'TJU. But that's what I do). I think it's conterproductive to relegate rock to the later evening/night hours... precisely when people who are supporting the local music scene are out at the venues (hopefully). The present morning build-up from Classical to Jazz and later to rock makes sense. But to come to a screeching halt in the early evening to start all over again never made sense to me... nor did tilting the schedule to Classical for one half of the week, and to Folk for the remainder. To a casual, not-so-invested listener, that has to be Whiplash radio.

Gerald Watts | June 27, 2010 9:21 am
I believe the answer to all 3 of the above is increasing awareness of the station.

Khristina VanHall | June 26, 2010 6:58 pm
PLEASE DON'T CHANGE SO YOU SOUND LIKE ALL THE OTHER CRAPPY RADIO IN TOWN. I listen to you for a reason, because you aren't playing the same vampire weekend song over and over, because I am perfectly content to NEVER hear DMB again EVER, because I don't need more Cauk Rawk....

Ponch McPhee | June 26, 2010 5:32 pm
Im a Sub Dj at TJU - I listen to All formats of music and Sub for nearly all formats of music. Im an Antiques business owner. I also Very recently donated a book to the University of Virginia which included a signatured/document by Edgar A. Poe. I also donated Numerous other rare UVA related historical items including a large framed photograph of Alderman signed by President Alderman himself.

Bill Tetzeli | June 26, 2010 3:31 pm
Threads. Threads, threads, threads, threads, threads. No reason not to have them and as long as we don't it will give people an excuse to go over to Tyler's forum instead. We need this kept on one site and we need it organized.

coogan brennan | June 25, 2010 7:42 am
I am writing to express my discontent at the changes you are attempting to rapidly implement at WTJU. As someone who cares for community integrity, I feel as though installing the AAA format, among your other suggestions, will merely add to the cultural homogeneity Clear Channel has encouraged in the United States. Local businesses contribute and continue unique local culture and WTJU, while not financially profitable, contributes significantly to the culture of Charlottesville. The University of Virginia is a public institution and many times public, not-for-profit institutions create value not in monetary, but rather social, terms. By numerous standards, humanity departments lose money and the unfortunate trend is the gradual elimination of a liberal arts education in favor of a more specialized, thus limited, vocational education. The shortsightedness behind this trend is also present in the University of Virginia's seeming inability to see redeeming worth in the larger value of a cultural facet such as WTJU. Times are hard economically but that should not mean we should react with fear. Rather, the University should properly recognize the elements which make it stand apart from other universities and protect such valuable organizations, such as WTJU, not just for yourself but for the greater city of Charlottesville.

Geof Carter | June 25, 2010 6:59 am
Eliminate paid staff except for the position of office manager. Return to a basically all-volunteer format. Not only would this cut expenses greatly, it would be the most significant means of reaching out to students and community.

Kirsten Miles | June 25, 2010 6:51 am
It seems to me that a combination of research into successful campus stations, further polling of listeners, and perhaps inviting student leadership from a broad swath of the student body including marketing research, music and arts, as well as the general student body could lead to some creative solutions, and greatly enhance student participation and listenership. Including retained staff could develop bonds that could "grow" the experience for everyone involved.

Andrew Pratt | June 24, 2010 10:32 pm
Extensive advance promotion of fund drives through a wide variety of media would be a welcome change and would help the bottom line immeasurably. This includes a vigorous campaign for contributions through wtju.net, efforts to have the drives mentioned on TV and online.

keith morris | June 24, 2010 9:15 pm
college radio has long been the last bastion of compelling & intelligent music. i've lived in college towns from athens to nashville to boulder, and wtju is the best radio station i've ever run across. i've learned things from listening to it; it's genuinely broadened my musical horizons. where else am i going to hear something as amazing & educational as the early music show? as a result, i've donated money & time to WTJU's pledge drives. this spring, i hosted a show with aer stephen on the music of vic chesnutt. believe me, no other radio station in town is going to do a show on vic chesnutt. but he was a great and important artist, and i was glad to do it. UVA supposedly exists for the betterment of its students and the community at large. WTJU does exactly that. i fear the people threatening changes have no understanding of the station's greatness.

steve vargo | June 24, 2010 6:01 pm
WTJU is one of the reasons I love to live in central VA - it is a rare jewel where seldom heard music can be discovered.

Jessie Abbate | June 24, 2010 5:45 pm
I actually have been trained as a DJ and have volunteered several times, but wouldn't say enough to count. I'd do way more if i had known it was so dire.

Emmett Boaz | June 24, 2010 4:56 pm
The immediate question facing WTJU is the status of the volunteers. They are either partners or unpaid employees. While we are all agreed that changes are needed at WTJU, a change to a dictatorial, manipulative management style is not one of them. While I cannot speak for others, I am not prepared to be an unpaid employee subject to the whims of management. It is for this reason and no other that I am resigning my long affiliation with WTJU.

U.Va. employee and music fan | June 24, 2010 4:38 pm
The voice of volunteer DJs needs to be heard. Changes can't be rammed through without consultation with them. Otherwise you'll end up with no DJs and must start from scratch. Mandated play lists is not WTJU plain and simple. Academic freedom in jeopardy, once again? WTJU is unique, let's keep it so.